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Topic: Pomerania


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In the News (Tue 23 Jul 19)

  
  CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Pomerania
Pomerania founded the first monasteries: in 1153 a Benedictine abbey at Stolp, and later a Premonstratensian abbey at Grobe on the island of Usedom.
Pomerania was assured in the fourteenth century, and the
Pomerania as far as the Peene was given to Brandenburg-Prussia; the rest of the province and the island of Rügen were obtained by Prussia in the treaty of 4 June, 1815.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/12225a.htm   (1472 words)

  
  Swedish Pomerania - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Pomerania became involved in the Thirty Years' War during the 1620s, and with the town of Stralsund under siege by imperial troops its ruler Bogislaus XIV, the Duke of Stettin, concluded a treaty with the Swedish King Gustavus Adolphus in June 1628.
As a consequence Pomerania would lapse into a state of anarchy, thereby forcing the Swedes to act and from 1641 the administration was led by a council ("Concilium status") from Stettin, until the peace treaty in 1648 settled rights to the province in Swedish favour.
The nobility of Pomerania was firmly established and held extensive privileges, as opposed to the other end of the spectrum which was populated by a class of numerous serfs.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Swedish_Pomerania   (1704 words)

  
 Pomerania - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Pomerania (Polish: Pomorze, German: Pommern and Pommerellen, Pomeranian (Kashubian): Pòmòrze and Pòmòrskô, Latin: Pomerania, Pomorania) is a geographical region today divided between northern Poland and Germany on the south coasts of the Baltic Sea between and on both sides of the Vistula and Oder (Odra) rivers, reaching the Recknitz river in the west.
A Polish province since 962, from 1181 until 1806, Pomerania was a part of the Holy Roman Empire and was ruled as imperial fiefs by the Dukes of Pomerania, and, briefly, the kings of Poland; also Denmark, Saxony, Brandenburg, Prussia, and Sweden.
Pomerania was conquered by the Polish duke Mieszko I in the second half of the 10th century.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Pomerania   (1564 words)

  
 Pomerania - Encyclopedia.com
Pomerania, region of N central Europe, extending along the Baltic Sea from a line W of Stralsund, Germany, to the Vistula River in Poland.
Pomerelia, as E Pomerania came to be known, became independent in 1227, was annexed to Poland in 1294, and was taken in 1308-9 by the Teutonic Knights, who incorporated it into their domain in East Prussia.
Pomerania continued as a duchy of the Holy Roman Empire until the death (1637) of Bogislav XIV, when the region was granted to the elector of Brandenburg.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-Pomerani.html   (1520 words)

  
 History of Pomerania - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In 1325, the principality of Rugen fell to Pomerania.
From 1300 until 1306 Eastern Pomerania was ruled by the Wenceslaus II of Bohemia and his son Wenceslaus III, King of Bohemia and Poland, later also disputed King of Hungary.
All of Pomerania in the Kingdom of Prussia (1815–1870)
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/History_of_Pomerania   (3891 words)

  
 Mecklenburg-West Pomerania - Encyclopedia.com
The region embraced by the state of Mecklenburg-West Pomerania is a low-lying, fertile agricultural area, with many lakes and forests.
Later awarded as a march to the dukes of Saxony, it was subdued (12th cent.) by Henry the Lion, and the Wendish prince Pribislaw became a vassal of the Holy Roman Empire.
The bitterness of Josef Monter, 57, a farmer in the district of Altentreptow, in the east German state of Mecklenburg-West Pomerania, is widely echoed in the region.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-MecklenWP.html   (1065 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Pomerania, Germany (German Political Geography) - Encyclopedia
From 1919 to 1939, Pomerania was divided among Germany, Poland, and the Free City of Danzig (Gdansk).
After the Potsdam Conference in 1945, all (c.2,800 sq mi/7,250 sq km) of former Prussian Pomerania W of the Oder (but excluding Stettin) was incorporated into the Soviet-occupied German state of Mecklenburg (see Mecklenburg–West Pomerania); the remaining and much larger part was transferred to Polish administration.
A part of the North European plain, Pomerania is a primarily agricultural lowland, with generally poor, often sandy or marshy soil.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/P/Pomerani.html   (320 words)

  
 Pomerania. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
Pomerelia, as E Pomerania came to be known, became independent in 1227, was annexed to Poland in 1294, and was taken in 1308–9 by the Teutonic Knights, who incorporated it into their domain in East Prussia.
Pomerania continued as a duchy of the Holy Roman Empire until the death (1637) of Bogislav XIV, when the region was granted to the elector of Brandenburg.
In the rest of Swedish Pomerania, the kings of Sweden remained princes of the Holy Roman Empire until the dissolution of the empire in 1806.
www.bartleby.com /65/po/Pomerani.html   (715 words)

  
 Pomerania   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Pomerania (Pomeranian/Kashubian: Pmrze, Polish: Pomorze, German: Pommern, Latin: Pomerania, Pomorania,) is the historical region on the south coasts of the Baltic Sea centered around the mouth of River Oder on the present-day border between Poland and Germany, reaching from River Reknitz in the west to River Vistula in the east.
It was ruled by the Dukes of Pomerania and later it belonged to Poland, Denmark, Saxony, Brandenburg, Prussia, Sweden and Germany.
All of Pomerania in the Kingdom of Prussia (1815-1870)
www.enlightenweb.net /p/po/pomerania.html   (4290 words)

  
 Pomerania   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
The eastern portion of this region then became part of Royal Prussia and since that time the name Pomerania has been limited to the western and central parts of the region (except for Poland, where the old usage of the term "Pomerania" has been retained).
In the early 1600's Pomerania was annexed by Sweden.
German inhabitants of the province escaped or were expelled and Poles from the formerly Polish regions in the East settled in Pomerania.
www.polishroots.org /genpoland/pom.htm   (311 words)

  
 Pomerania History
Sweden received Western Pomerania by the Peace of Westphalia (1648); part of it was returned to Brandenburg-Prussia in 1720, and the remainder (Stralsund and Rügen) was recovered by Prussia in 1815.
The German population of eastern and central Pomerania was expelled westward and replaced by Poles.
The part of Pomerania west of the Odra was included in the new state of Mecklenburg, in the Soviet Zone of Occupation (later East Germany—1949-90).
www.richware.net /rohde/pomerania_history.htm   (1286 words)

  
 Pommern History
The earliest inhabitants of Pomerania were Germanic tribes that migrated southwards from Scandinavia prior to 100 B.C. By the fifth century A.D., these tribes, known as the Goths, Vandals, Germanii, and Teutoni, had migrated westward and the area was settled by Slavic tribes that entered from the east.
Pomerania became a duchy of the Holy Roman Empire in 1181 when Bogislaw I swore his allegiance to Frederick I (Barbarosa), the German King and Roman Emperor.
On September 14, 1811, serfdom in Pomerania was abolished and the serfs who had been under hereditary bondage to the estates were now free to move from village to village, choose their own trade, and marry a spouse of their choice.
www.genemaas.net /Pommern.htm   (3648 words)

  
 History of Pomerania
Pomerania covers the Baltic Sea coast with its area between Darß and Rixhöft. Pomerania is divided by the river "Oder" into West Pomerania and Eastern Pomerania.
Pomerania was originally inhabited by the Germanic trunk of the Rugier The Slaves (Wenden) followed them, which the country Pomorje ("coastal country") called and already 600 A. important commercial centres at the Baltic Sea possessed (Julin-Wollin).
Pomerania was conquered by Heinrich "the lion", the duke of Saxonia and Bavaria.
www.ruegenwalde.com /rwalde/pgesch_e.htm   (800 words)

  
 Pom
Pomerania was divided into Vorpommern that was west of the Oder River, and Hinterpommern that was east of the Oder.
The Bogislaw family ruled Pomerania as that time, but sometimes there were two or three dukes of the Bogislaw family ruling different parts of Pomerania as the land was divided by inheritance.
In 1147 Henry the Lion, the Duke of Saxony mounted a crusade to fight the heathen Wends to the east of Pomerania.
www.geocities.com /schlochau/Pom.html   (2197 words)

  
 The History of Pomerania   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
At the end of World War II in 1945, the two sections of Pomerania, Vorpommern west of the Oder-Neisse Rivers, and Hinterpommern, the lands east of the Oder-Neisse Rivers, were divided by the powers who won the 2nd World War.
The Bogislaw family ruled Pomerania at the time, but sometimes there were 2 or 3 dukes of the Bogislaw family ruling different parts of Pomerania as the land was divided by inheritance.
In 1147 Henry the Lion, the Duke of Saxony, mounted a crusade to fight the Wends to the east of Pomerania.
blacklake.biz /meck/pommhist.htm   (1672 words)

  
 Courtly Lives - Tczew, Poland/Dirschau, Germany
Western Pomerania centered on Szczecin (Stettin) and was ruled by a native slav dynasty and was contested in turn by the Poles, Danes and Brandenburgers.
Pomerania and Brandenburg preferred and deliberately chose German domination to the "hated overlordship" of Poland (Thompson, 433, 446).
There was in the Vistulan Pomerania a ducal family related to the Piasts, because of this it was thought that the Vistulan Pomeranians recognized the Piast hegomony of their own free will.
www.angelfire.com /mi4/polcrt/Tczew.html   (1480 words)

  
 Pomerania   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Euroregion Pomerania is seeking proposals for the projects with a positive cross-border impact in the area of the Polish side of the Pomerania Euroregion with financial assistance from the Co-operation Programme in Baltic Sea Region 2002 – 2003...
Euroregion Pomerania is seeking proposals for the projects with a positive cross-border impact in the area of the Polish side of the Pomerania Euroregion with financial assistance from the SPF Phare Poland - Baltic Sea Region 2002 Cross-Border...
Euroregion Pomerania is seeking proposals for the projects with a positive cross-border impact in the area of the Polish side of the Pomerania Euroregion with financial assistance from the Phare Poland - Germany 2002 Cross-Border Co-operation...
www.pomerania.org.pl /_en/index.php   (221 words)

  
 Regents of Pomerania
About 995 was Pomerania conquered by Poland for the first time and it was thereafter struggling to retain as much of its autonomy as possible against Poland, Denmark and German states.
The branch of the Pomeranian princely house that ruled the most western part of Pomerania (Slawia) was called the house of Greif and they assumed the title duke 1170, which was confirmed by the German emperor 1181.
When the last member of the house of Greif died 1637 was Pomerania already occupied by Swedish troops and it was divided between Sweden and Brandenburg in the peace of Westphalia.
www.tacitus.nu /historical-atlas/regents/poland/pomerania.htm   (382 words)

  
 Mecklenburg Vorpommern WorldGenWeb Page   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
This includes the portions of the former Pomerania that are west of the Oder River and were and are known as Vorpommern.
Mecklenburg-West Pomerania is a state in northeastern Germany, bounded on the north by the Baltic Sea, on the west by Schleswig Holstein, on the southwest by Lower Saxony, on the south by Brandenburg, and on the east by Poland.
Pomerania was that land in northeast Germany along the Baltic Sea from Mecklenburg on the west to almost Danzig (now Gdansk, Poland) on the east.
www.blacklake.biz /meck   (817 words)

  
 GoPoland! Web Travel Guide to Poland
Pomerania remains an historically unique region, whose diverse population has included the original Celts displaced by Germans, then Slavs, and then Poles when Mieszko I took the historical capital of Szczecin in 979.
During those centuries, the region was divided, and Gdansk became the capital of the eastern component.
That portion reclaimed in WWII is now again in Polish hands, along with the rest of Pomerania (ceded to Poland to compensate for land losses to the east) after more than half a millennium under 'foreign rule'.
www.gopoland.com /wheretogo/regions/pomerania.shtml   (418 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Mecklenburg–West Pomerania, Germany (German Political Geography) - Encyclopedia
The region embraced by the state of Mecklenburg–West Pomerania is a low-lying, fertile agricultural area, with many lakes and forests.
Later awarded as a march to the dukes of Saxony, it was subdued (12th cent.) by Henry the Lion, and the Wendish prince Pribislaw became a vassal of the Holy Roman Empire.
As constituted in 1947 under Soviet military occupation, Mecklenburg consisted of the former states of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Mecklenburg-Strelitz, and of that part of the former Prussian province of Pomerania situated W of the Oder River (but not including Stettin).
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/M/MecklenWP.html   (466 words)

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