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Topic: Pontus


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  Pontus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Pontus is the name which was applied, in ancient times, to extensive tracts of country in the northeast of Asia Minor (modern Turkey) bordering on the Euxine (Black Sea), which was often called simply Pontos (the main), by the Greeks, after the colonisation of the Anatolian shores by the Ionian Greeks.
Pontus continued to be an autonomous state under the Imperial rule of Constantinople through most of the history of the Byzantine Empire.
In the 20th century, the situation of Christian minorities in Pontus worsened with the increasing influence of the Young Turks, culminating in mass killings and deportations.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Pontus   (734 words)

  
 Pontus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-20)
Ekhemmet Familjen Ekhem i Karlstad: Regina, Petter och Pontus.
Quem terra, pontus, sidera Ancient hymn in honour of the Blessed Virgin.
Histos: Ammianus Marcellinus on the Geography of the Pontus Euxinus Paper by Jan Willem Drijvers of the University of Groningen considering Marcellinus' digression on the Black Sea in the Res Gestae as a literary rather than reference piece.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Pontus.html   (564 words)

  
 Pontus
In Greek mythology, Pontus ("sea") was an ancient sea-god, son of Gaia and Aether.
Pontus, a name applied in ancient times to extensive tracts of country in the northeast of Asia Minor (modern Turkey) bordering on the Euxine (Black Sea), which was often called simply Pontos (the Main), by the Greeks.
Part of the kingdom was now annexed to the Roman Empire, being united with Bithynia in a double province called "Pontus and Bithynia": this part included only the seaboard between Heracleia (Eregli) and Amisus (Samsun), the ora Pontica.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/po/Pontus.html   (319 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Pontus
Most of Pontus was for administrative purposes united by the Romans with the province of Bithynia, though the eastern part subsisted as a separate kingdom under Polemon and his house, 36 BC to 63 AD, and the southwestern portion was incorporated with the province of Galatia.
Pontus shared the vicissitudes of this rather unfortunate government until, in 1204, a branch of the Byzantine imperial family established in Pontus a separate small state with its capital at Trebizond.
After the colonisation of the Anatolian shores by the Ionian Greeks, Pontus soon became a name which was applied, in ancient times, to extensive tracts of country in the northeast of Asia Minor (modern Turkey) bordering on the Euxine (Black Sea), which was often called simply Pontos (the Main), by the Greeks.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Pontus   (3369 words)

  
 PONTUS - LoveToKnow Article on PONTUS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-20)
This region is regarded by the geographer Strabo (A.D. 1920), himself a native of the country, as Pontus in the strict sense of the term (Geogr.
Its native population was of the same stock as that of Cappadocia, of which it had formed a part, an Oriental race often called by the Greeks Leucosyri or White Syrians, as distinguished from the southern Syrians, who were of a darker complexion, but their precise ethnological relations are uncertain.
Christianity was introduced into the province Pontus (thi Ora pontica) by way of the sea in the 1st century after Christ and was deeply rooted when Pliny governed the provinci (AD.
36.1911encyclopedia.org /P/PO/PONTUS.htm   (1173 words)

  
 Pontus
As to the annals of Pontus, the one brilliant passage of its history is the life of the great Mithridates.
Pontus proper extended from the Halys River on the West to the borders of Colchis on the East, its interior boundaries meeting those of Galatia, Cappadocia and Armenia.
Greek culture by degrees took root along the coast; it mixed with, and in turn was modified by, the character of the older native inhabitants.
holycall.com /biblemaps/pontus.htm   (1304 words)

  
 Pontus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-20)
In Greek mythology, Pontus ("sea") was an ancientsea-god, son of Gaia and Aether.
Pontus was a name applied in ancient times to extensive tracts of country in the northeast of Asia Minor (modern Turkey) bordering on theEuxine (Black Sea), which was often called simply Pontos (the Main), by the Greeks.
Hereafter the simple name Pontus withoutqualification was regularly employed to denote the half of this dual province, especially by Romans and people speaking from theRoman point of view; it is so used almost always in the NewTestament.
www.therfcc.org /pontus-77218.html   (330 words)

  
 Pontus: Facts and details from Encyclopedia Topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-20)
Pontus was a name applied in ancient times to extensive tracts of country in the northeast of Asia Minor Anatolia quick summary:
Mithridates vi of pontus, (132 bc- 63 bc), called eupator dionysius, was the king of pontus in asia minor and one of romes most formidable...
Paphlagonia was an ancient area on the northern central fl sea coast of anatolia, situated between bithynia and pontus, separated from galatia...
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/p/po/pontus.htm   (1506 words)

  
 Mithridates VI of Pontus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Mithridates VI, (in Greek Μιθριδάτης, 132 BC – 63 BC), called Eupator Dionysius, also known as Mithridates the Great, was the King of Pontus from 120 BC to 63 BC in Asia Minor and one of Rome's most formidable and successful enemies, meeting and engaging three of the most successful generals of the late Republic.
Mithridates VI was the son of Mithridates V of Pontus (150 BC – 120 BC), called Euergetes.
To clear his path to the throne of the kingdom of Pontus, he killed off many of his brothers but not his sister, Laodice, whom he married.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Mithradates_VI_of_Pontus   (749 words)

  
 Mithridates VI of Pontus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-20)
Mithridates VI of Pontus, (132 BC - 63 BC), called Eupator Dionysius, was the king of Pontus in Asia Minor and one of Rome 's most formidable and successful enemies.
Mithridates was the son of Mithridates V of Pontus, called Euergetes.
During the First Mithridatic War fought between 88 BC and 84 BC, Lucius Cornelius Sulla forced Mithridates out of Greece proper, but then had to return to Italy to answer the threat posed by Marius, and thus Mithridates was defeated but not beaten.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Mithridates_VI_of_Pontus.html   (547 words)

  
 Pontus Mörth Racing
Pontus startade i tredje led och var uppe på fjärde plats, när duggregnet på Mantorp övergick till rikligt regn.
Då körde jag Formel 3, vann överlägset och tog guld i Nordiska Mästerskapen, minns Pontus.
För Pontus var det för första gången i främsta startledet sedan han började köra STCC som ung privatförare för några år sedan.
www.motorsportivarmland.nu /morth.html   (4114 words)

  
 Republic of Pontus (Greece, 1917-1919)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-20)
The Hellenic population of the Pontus (North Turkey, coast of Black sea) was the bastion of Hellenism during the Ottoman rule.
The bishoprics of the Pontus became centers of guidance and recruitement of rebels, whereas the mountains became centers of resistance against the Ottomans.
The Republic of Pontus was never proclaimed but irregular Greek troops used the flag, as did an embryo of state, not occupying all the claimed areas.
www.fotw.net /flags/gr_pont.html   (295 words)

  
 Pontus - All About Turkey   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-20)
Pontus was an ancient country, North-east of Asia Minor (now Turkey), on the Black Sea coast.
B.C., Pontus was taken over by a Persian family, profiting by the breakup of the empire of Alexander the Great, and by 281 B.C. the ruler (Mithradates II) called himself king.
The Romans joined Pontus to the province of Galatia - Cappadocia.
www.allaboutturkey.com /pontus.htm   (219 words)

  
 ATMG - Pontus Issue
It was contemplated by Greek policy-makers that the exploitation of the "Pontus" idea would help in their efforts to undermine the political and cultural principles on which the modern Turkish state stands and would also provide a pretext for forcing out members of the Turkish Minority from Western Thrace.
Indeed, in the effort to change the demographical composition of the intensely Turkish populated Western Thrace, the Greek government settled in Western Thrace 120,000 "Pontian Greeks" that emigrated from the territories of the former Soviet Union.
On July 7 1920, the Athens Pontus Committee, in a memorandum delivered to the Greek government, proposed that 20,000 well-equipped men from Pontus should be sent to inland districts of Anatolia to support the invading Greek forces.
www.atmg.org /PontusIssue.html   (1188 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Pontus
In ancient times, Pontus was the name of the north-eastern province of Asia Minor, a long and narrow strip of land on the southern coast of the Black Sea (Pontus Euxinus), from which the designation was later transferred to the country.
Mithradates VI became involved in three wars with the Romans (88-84, 83-81, 74-64), and finally his kingdom, which he had increased by the conquest of Colchis, the Crimea, Paphlagonia, and Cappadocia, was lost to the Romans (63).
The Pontus mentioned in the Old Testament of the Vulgate in Gen., xiv, 1, 9, is a mistaken translation, according to Symmachus, for the district of Ellasar (Larsa in southern Babylonia).
www.newadvent.org /cathen/12234c.htm   (874 words)

  
 www.myspace.com/pontusjback
Pontus J. Back started his musical career very young and at the age of 8 years he formed his first band The Killers.
Pontus J. Back is also the third guitarist of the Finnish Southern Rock Band, The Slidemobile.
Pontus J. Back is endoresed by FGW-Guitars and his relationship to the "maestro" Matti Nevalainen is on the way to show off these excellent FGW and Flying Finn custom guitars worldwide.
www.myspace.com /pontusjback   (562 words)

  
 BCSD - Pontus Lindqvist
Pontus Lindqvist, born in 1986, is one of Sweden's current foremost boy sopranos.
Pontus also sang in the Adolf Frederik Boys' Choir and often appeared as a soloist in the Oskar Church.
Pontus is accompanied by a small group of adult singers and a chamber orchestra.
www.boysoloist.com /artist.asp?VID=195   (290 words)

  
 Daily Bible Study - Pontus
Pontus, from the Greek word (pronounced) pontos, meaning sea, was a territory of northern Asia Minor (see the map below) on the Black Sea (hence the likely reason for its name).
Some people of Pontus were at the "birthday of the church" Pentecost (see below), at the time when Paul was still a persecutor of the church, before his conversion (see Paul's Ministry), when Paul had much more to learn from them than they from him.
Pontus was a Roman province in the early Church era.
www.keyway.ca /htm2006/20060112.htm   (789 words)

  
 Pontus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-20)
Originally part of that more central territory called Cappadocia, the region which was naturally secured by surrounding mountain ranges and the sea, was created in the aftermath of the death of Alexander.
Pontus had been largely colonized by Greeks for several centuries prior to the campaigns of Alexander, but his conquests gave Hellenization a firm hold over the inhabitants.
Pontus as its own state was founded by Mithridates I in the dynastic struggles that followed the death of Alexander.
www.unrv.com /provinces/pontus.php   (729 words)

  
 Pontus on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-20)
PONTUS [Pontus] ancient country, NE Asia Minor (now Turkey), on the Black Sea coast.
Pontus genocide monument overshadows relations between Turkey and Greece: Turkish FM.
Pontus named head coach of Belarus soccer team.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/P/Pontus2.asp   (280 words)

  
 Pontus Wikner
Pontus died as a professor in Kristiania (Oslo), Norway, on 15 May 1888.
He was a noble man with his inheritance of hardness and strictness from his father and sympathy from his charming, lovable and dreaming mother.
Pontus had suffered great pain and must have had a hellish life.
www.runeberg.org /authors/wiknerkp.html   (397 words)

  
 Iranica.com - PONTUS
PONTUS, a Greek word meaning "sea," generally taken in the ancient world to refer to the Black Sea, Pontos Euxeinos, or Axeinos (Strabo 1.2.10 C21).
Strabo (12.1.4 C534) says that both Pontus and its neighbor to the south, Cappadocia, developed from the two Cappadocian satrapies of the Persian empire, and that it was the Macedonians—presumably he means the Seleucids—who had named one Pontus and the other Cappadocia.
Geographically, Pontus divided into two distinct parts—a narrow, coastal strip,and a mountainous, inland region interspersed with fertile river valleys and separated from the sea by the Pontic Alps, which run parallel and close to the coast and which limited routes of communications between the two zones.
www.iranica.com /articles/ot_grp5/ot_pontus_20040616.html   (1013 words)

  
 Geometry.Net - Scientists: Heraclides Of Pontus
heraclides of pontus He proposed that the seeming westward movement of theheavenly bodies is due to the eastward rotation of the earth on its axis.
Heraclides of Pontus, Greek philosopher of 4th century AD, was the first to explain that the apparent rotation of the heavens is brought about by rotation of the earth on its axis rather than by the passage of stars around the Earth.
Gloss This was the opinion of one called heraclides of pontus who proposedthat the earth is moved circularly and that the heavens are at rest.
www.geometry.net /detail/scientists/heraclides_of_pontus.html   (2001 words)

  
 Pontus articles on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-20)
Pontus PONTUS [Pontus] ancient country, NE Asia Minor (now Turkey), on the Black Sea coast.
The sonnets in his Erreurs amoureuses (3 vol., 1549-55) are imitative of Petrarch and are among the earliest written in France.
Gaea GAEA [Gaea], in Greek religion and mythology, the earth, daughter of Chaos, both mother and wife of Uranus (the sky) and Pontus (the sea).
www.encyclopedia.com /printable/10402.html   (420 words)

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