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Topic: Pope Gregory XII


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In the News (Wed 21 Aug 19)

  
  Pope Gregory XII - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Correr relatives of Gregory XII and Ladislaus of Naples (1399–1414), the supporter of Gregory XII and his predecessor for political reasons, used all their influence to prevent the meeting, and each Pope was fearful of being captured by the party of the rival Pope.
Gregory XII, who had meanwhile created ten more cardinals, had convoked a rival council at Cividale del Friuli, near Aquileia; though only a few bishops had appeared, Gregory XII's cardinals pronounced Benedict XIII and Alexander V schismatics, perjurers, and devastators of the Church.
Gregory XII appointed Charles of Malatesta and Cardinal Dominici of Ragusa as his proxies.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Pope_Gregory_XII   (427 words)

  
 Council of Constance - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Hereupon the commission by Gregory XII authorizing his proxy to resign the Papacy on his behalf was read and Malatesta, acting in the name of Gregory XII, pronounced the resignation of the papacy by Gregory XII and handed a written copy of the resignation to the assembly.
Gregory XII´s cardinals were accepted as true cardinals by the Council, but the members of the council delayed electing a new pope for fear that a new pope would restrict further discussion of pressing issues in the Church.
The new pope, Martin V, elected November 1417, soon asserted the absolute authority of the papal office, and the claim that a council might be superior to a single pope was set aside when it was later declared that a council of Bishops has no greater authority than the Pope.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Council_of_Constance   (1289 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: St. Gregory the Great
Gregory's father was Gordianus, a wealthy patrician, probably of the famous gens Amicia, who owned large estates in Sicily and a mansion on the Caelian Hill in Rome, the ruins of which, apparently in a wonderful state of preservation, still await excavation beneath the Church of St. Andrew and St. Gregory.
Gregory's mind and memory were both exceptionally receptive, and it is to the effect produced on him by these disasters that we must attribute the tinge of sadness which pervades his writings and especially his clear expectation of a speedy end to the world.
Gregory of Tours tells us that in grammar, rhetoric and dialectic he was so skilful as to be thought second to none in all Rome, and it seems certain also that he must have gone through a course of legal studies.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/06780a.htm   (7836 words)

  
 Patron Saints Index: Pope Gregory XII
Gregory negotiated meetings and abdication agreements with Benedict, but his rival never followed through on them.
Neither Gregory nor Benedict attended, and on 5 June 1409 the cardinals deposed them both as schismatics; they elected Alexander V on 26 June 1409.
Gregory created ten more cardinals, convened them at Cividale del Friuli, and declared Benedict and Alexander to be schismatics.
www.catholic-forum.com /saints/pope0205.htm   (240 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Pope Gregory XII
The relatives of Gregory XII, to whom he was always inordinately attached, and King Ladislaus of Naples, for political reasons used all their efforts to prevent the meeting of the pontiffs.
Meanwhile Gregory stayed with his loyal and powerful protector, Prince Charles of Malatesta, who had come to Pisa in person during the process of the council, in order to effect an understanding between Gregory XII and the cardinals of both obediences.
Though forsaken by most of his cardinals, Gregory XII was still the true pope and was recognized as such by Rupert, King of the Romans, King Ladislaus of Naples, and some Italian princes.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/07001a.htm   (825 words)

  
 Expert Answer Forum
Gregory XII's authorization of subsequent conciliar acts extended to all measures taken by the Council except for doctrinal declarations.
Since Gregory XII resigned, and he had not approved any of the sessions prior to his resignation, none of the doctrinal statements made then by the Council of Constance could be considered infallible since there was no pope to approve them.
Pope Martin V was elected unanimously in the 41st session on November 8, 1417.
www.saint-mike.org /Apologetics/QA/Answers/Church_History/h001226Nate.html   (644 words)

  
 Pope Gregory XII - Psychology Central   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Correr relatives of Gregory XII and Ladislas of Naples, the supporter of Gregory and his predecessor for political reasons, used all their influence to prevent the meeting, and each pope was fearful of being captured by the party of the rival pope.
Meanwhile Gregory stayed with his loyal and powerful protector, Prince Charles of Malatesta, who had come to Pisa in person during the process of the council, in order to support Gregory XII with both sets of cardinals.
Gregory XII, who had meanwhile created ten more cardinals, had convoked a rival council at Cividale del Friuli, near Aquileia; though only a few bishops had appeared, Gregory's cardinals pronounced Benedict XIII and Alexander V schismatics, perjurers, and devastators of the Church.
psychcentral.com /psypsych/Gregory_XII   (457 words)

  
 Can the Pope Retire?
Pope St. Pontian was martyred in 236 (237), either from ill treatment in general or from a mortal beating.
Pope Sylvester III was consecrated on Jan. 20, 1045.
Pope Gregory XII (1406 - 1415) was elected as the legitimate pope at a time when there were two anti-popes: The Avignon Pope, Benedict XIII, who was supported by the French king; and the Pisa Pope, John XXIII, who was supported by conciliarists of the renegade Council of Pisa.
www.catholiceducation.org /articles/religion/re0786.html   (1221 words)

  
 Late Middle Ages - Pope Gregory XII   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Fourth Roman pope of the Schism, Angelo Carrario was a Venetian.
Gregory claimed later that he feared Benedict's people would lay hands on him, but that hardly seems credible.
By 1408, Gregory's cardinals were disgusted with the whole business, convinced that Gregory did not mean to abdicate.
history.boisestate.edu /hy309/papacy/gregoryxii.html   (348 words)

  
 ARTICLE-UPON THIS ROCK
Pope St. Leo II (681-683) did confirm the acts of the council, but he also noted explicitly that Pope Honorius was being condemned for tardiness and negligence in not denouncing the Monothe lite heresy sooner.
No Pope has ever resigned for reasons of health, though several of them (notably Pope Leo XIII at the beginning of this century) have lived into their nineties, and one (Clement XII, the 246th Pope) was totally blind for the last eight years of his pontificate (1732-40).
Pope Urban VI was validly elected and generally recognized as Pope in 1378 but was betrayed later that year by his entire College of Cardinals, which claimed against all the evidence that his election was invalid, and named Cardinal Robert of Gene va to take his place as Clement VII.
www.catholic.net /RCC/Periodicals/Dossier/1998-03-04/rock.html   (2833 words)

  
 Pope Gregory XII
Gregory, born Angelo Coriaro (or Correr), Roman Catholic Pope from the 30th of November 1406, to the 4th of July 1415, was born of a noble family at Venice about 1326.
As Pope, he concluded a treaty with his rival at Marseilles, by which a general council was to be held at Savona in September, 1408, but King Ladislaus of Naples, who opposed the plan from policy, seized Rome and brought the negotiations to nought.
John XXIII, having succeeded to the claims of Alexander in 1410, concluded a treaty with Ladislaus, by which Gregory was banished from Naples on the 31st of October 1411.
www.nndb.com /people/129/000094844   (220 words)

  
 CNN.com - Doctors perform tracheotomy on pope - Feb 24, 2005
Pope John Paul II is taken to a Rome hospital after a relapse.
The pope was taken to the hospital on Thursday, less than two weeks after he had been released from the facility after a nine-day stay from complications of the flu.
The pope was taken to hospital on February 1 after suffering breathing difficulties, later diagnosed as the flu complicated by an acute respiratory infection.
www.cnn.com /2005/WORLD/europe/02/24/pope   (775 words)

  
 Catholic World News : Bishop's Remarks on Papal Resignation Cause Furor
Pope Martin I, who was exiled by the Byzantine emperor in 653, tacitly approved the election of a successor, Pope Eugene I. In 964 Pope Benedict V, often seen as an anti-pope, was deposed by Emperor Otto I, and accepted that verdict, renouncing his pontificate.
Pope Sylvester III was expelled by his rival, Pope Benedict IX, in 1045; Benedict IX in turn abdicated several months later in favor of Pope Gregory VI.
Pope John Paul II (bio - news) himself addressed the question of papal resignation in his apostolic constitution Universi Dominici Gregis, concerning the procedures for a papal conclave.
www.cwnews.com /news/viewstory.cfm?recnum=11977   (518 words)

  
 COUNCIL OF CONSTANCEUnder Pope John XXIII
Gregory XII sent to Constance as his representatives his protector Carlo Malatesta, the Lord of Rimini, and the Dominican cardinal, John Domenici—to Constance indeed, but not to the General Council assembled there by the authority, and in the name, of John XXIII.
It ratified all Gregory XII's acts, received his cardinals as cardinals, promised that his officers should keep their posts and declared that if Gregory was barred from re-election as pope, this was only for the peace of the Church, and not from any personal unworthiness.
The pope ought not to be called "most holy" even by reason of his office, for otherwise even a king ought to be called "most holy" by reason of his office and executioners and heralds ought to be called "holy", indeed even the devil would be called "holy" since he is an official of God.
www.ewtn.com /library/COUNCILS/CONSTANC.HTM   (13849 words)

  
 Three Popes during the Great Western Schism (1378-1415)?   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Gregory XII called the Council of Constance in 1414 on condition it accept his authority to call it and then resigned as promised.
This came about because the French cardinals questioned the validity of Pope Urban's election (however, Robert of Geneva even wrote to the Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV to comfirm the election, and Pedro de Luna, another major figure in the schism, wrote similarly to his rulers in Spain).
There, a group of disaffected cardinals from both the Gregory XII and antipope de Luna's camps (they were disillusioned by the military and political actions of both, and by Gregory's having reneged on his promises to meet de Luna in Savona (near Genoa) to seek a settlement).
www.angelfire.com /ms/seanie/papacy/schism.html   (538 words)

  
 GREGORY XVI   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Gregory, however, could scarcely take seriously such requests from notorious despots like Metternich and Czar Nicholas I. Indeed, down to the last Gregory believed in ruling his States with a strong hand.
Gregory condemned the slave trade in 1839, and he adopted a sane policy of dealing with de facto governments which was to save much embarrassment for the Holy See.
Though Gregory suffered much from political troubles and from the persecution of his children in Spain, he enjoyed the consolation of seeing the Church win a great fight with Prussian bureaucracy in the mixed- marriage question.
www.cfpeople.org /Books/Pope/POPEp252.htm   (518 words)

  
 Is Sedevacantism Catholic?  Part 2
For fear of their lives (note this was after the new pope had been elected), they dressed an Italian cardinal in the robes of the pope and presented him to the crowd as the new pope.
When pope or anti-pope died, the new popes were required to agree to do what they could, even resign, if the counter-part would do the same so a new pope could then be elected to resolve the question of who was the real pope.
Even though the true pope had resigned and the council was in place to elect the new pope, it appears that the Holy Ghost’s hand was not to be forced as the new pope wasn’t elected until the chair was truly vacant, due to Gregory’s death.
www.sspx.org /miscellaneous/is_sedevacantism_catholic2.html   (1658 words)

  
 GREGORY XII   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Malatesta, who was Gregory's friend and protector, urged him to live up to his good resolutions and do his part to end the schism.
Gregory at last agreed and sent a legate to the Council of Constance, first to convoke the council in Gregory's name and then to announce his abdication.
Gregory XII had been treated by the council as legitimate pope, and after his abdication he was made bishop of Porto and perpetual legate of Ancona.
www.cfpeople.org /Books/Pope/POPEp203.htm   (521 words)

  
 Church History Forum: Papal Abdication and Retirement   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Pope St. Martin I (649-655): resigned in 655 while in exile in Crimea (he had been exiled by the Byzantine Emperor Constans II for his rejection of the heresy of Monothelitism).
Pope Benedict IX (1032-45): this pope was one of the few bad eggs that have held the Chair of Peter.
Pope Gregory VI (1045-46): this pope was the godfather of Benedict IX, he bought the office from his godson, to avoid further scandal.
www.saint-mike.org /Apologetics/QA/Answers/Church_History/h010826Lim.html   (427 words)

  
 Leap Year: Invented by Caesar; Perfected by a Pope, Alaska Science Forum   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
In 1582, Pope Gregory XII noticed that the spring equinox---when day and night are of equal length---fell upon March 11 instead of March 21.
To make the calendar more sun-accurate than Caesar's, Pope Gregory XII pulled out his abacus and calculated the following leap year restrictions (I'd advise a swig of coffee here): If the first year of a century is divisible by 400, it is a leap year; if it's not, then that year isn't a leap year.
The pope's mathematical modification knocked out leap years in 1800 and 1900, but in 2000 we'll have another one, because 2000 divides evenly into 400.
www.gi.alaska.edu /ScienceForum/ASF12/1272.html   (565 words)

  
 Constance, Council of. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
The council was dominated by theologians, especially French, who held the conciliar theory (i.e., that councils held supreme power in the church and that even the pope was subject to their edicts) that had appeared at the Council of Pisa (see Pisa, Council of).
Gregory XII, meanwhile, sent legates with a formal decree to convene a council; this was accepted by the convention, which then ceremonially declared the council convened; at the same time Gregory resigned the papacy (July 4, 1415).
An elaborate method of electing the new pope was adopted, and the conclave soon agreed on Martin V (Nov. 11, 1417).
www.bartleby.com /65/co/ConstncCo.html   (533 words)

  
 February 9, 1999 DAILY CATHOLIC TEXT Section One (feb9dc1.htm)
It was hoped that when Pope Gregory XII was chosen to succeed the rascal Pope Innocent VII that the schism would finally come to an end, but there were trials and tribulations to come before this would become a reality at the end of his reign.
Pope Innocent VII's was not mourned in the least for the people of Italy were fed up with his double standards and lack of pastoral presence in a Church that was badly in need of some ecclesial guidance.
Gregory was forced to flee in disguise to Gaeta under the protection of Ladislas.
www.dailycatholic.org /issue/99Feb/feb9dc1.htm   (4029 words)

  
 papal resignation   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
On the other hand, Pope St. Silverius, who was consecrated pope on June 1, 536, was the first pope forcibly deposed.
He was the nephew of Pope Benedict VIII (1012 — 1024) and Pope John XIX (1024 — 1032), and a member of one of the powerful families.
Pope Gregory XII (1406 1415) was elected as the legitimate pope at a time when there were two anti-popes: The Avignon Pope, Benedict XIII, who was supported by the French king; and the Pisa Pope, John XXIII, who was supported by conciliarists of the renegade Council of Pisa.
www.catholicherald.com /saunders/05ws/ws050303.htm   (1229 words)

  
 Western Schism
Urban VI was the first elected at the time of the Western Schism, a second claimant elected by the same Cardinals six months later and a third line started at the Council of Pisa, which none hold to be legitimate.
This decision of Pope Benedict XIV was not available to us at the time, but was discovered later.
The election of a nonmember of the Catholic Church, such as a heretic or an apostate is invalid, because it is impossible for a heretic to become Pope.
www.popemichael1.homestead.com /WesternSchism.html   (272 words)

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