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Topic: Possessive case


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In the News (Sun 16 Jun 19)

  
  b. Forming Possessives. 8. Word Formation. The American Heritage Book of English Usage. 1996
The possessive case of a singular noun is formed by adding -’s: one’s home, by day’s end, our family’s pet, the witness’s testimony, a fox’s habitat, the knife’s edge.
The possessive case of a plural noun ending in -s is formed by adding just an apostrophe: the doctors’ recommendations, the glasses’ rims, the flies’ buzzing noises.
The possessive case of most proper nouns is formed according to the rules for common nouns: (singular) Eliot’s novels, Yeats’s poetry, Dostoyevsky’s biography, Velázquez’s paintings; (plural) the McCarthys’ and the Williamses’ parties, the Schwartzes’ trip.
www.bartleby.com /64/82.html   (435 words)

  
 Possessive case - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Possessive case is a case that exists in some languages used for possession.
When something is inalienably possessed, it is usually an attribute: for example, John's big nose is inalienably possessed, because it cannot (without surgery) be removed from John — it's simply a quality he has.
The term 'possessive case' is often used to refer to the "'s" morpheme, which is suffixed onto many nouns in English to denote 'possession by'.
www.encyclopedia-online.info /Possessive_case   (257 words)

  
 Genitive case - FreeEncyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
The genitive case is a form of a noun that indicates the possessive case of a noun, i.e.
Linguists however have shown that the English possessive is not a case at all, but rather a clitic, an independent word which however is always written and pronounced as part of the preceding word.
This developed, later, into the modern English possessive mark of " 's " as in "bone's." The 18th century explanation that the apostrophe might replace a genitive pronoun, as in "the king's horse" being a shortened form of "the king, his horse," is erroneous.
openproxy.ath.cx /ge/Genitive_case.html   (309 words)

  
 Possessive case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Society for Case Research Assists in the development of individual efforts in the field of case writing, case teaching and case research which enhances business education.
Guaraní Possessive Constructions Discusses the different ways in which the concept of Possession is encoded in Guaraní.
Case e Casali Offre case di campagna, casali e case coloniche ristrutturate o da ristrutturare è una immobiliare che si occupa anche di edilizia e di ristrutturazioni di case antiche in centri storici e campagna.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Possessive_case.html   (555 words)

  
 Possessive case -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Possessive case is a (Nouns or pronouns or adjectives (often marked by inflection) related in some way to other words in a sentence) grammatical case that exists in some languages and is used to indicate a relationship of (Anything owned or possessed) possession.
It is not the same as the (The case expressing ownership) genitive case, though the two have similar meanings in many languages.
The term "possessive case" is often used to refer to the "'s" (Minimal meaningful language unit; it cannot be divided into smaller meaningful units) morpheme, which is suffixed onto many nouns in English to denote possession.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/P/Po/Possessive_case.htm   (199 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Grammatical case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
The patient of a (transitive) verb is in the accusative case.
The trigger may be identified as the agent, patient, etc. Other nouns may be inflected for case, but the inflections are overloaded; for example, in Tagalog, the subject and object of a verb are both expressed in the genitive case when they are not in the trigger case.
The Status of Morphological Case in the Icelandic Lexicon (http://www.hi.is/~eirikur/cases.pdf) by Eiríkur Rögnvaldsson.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Grammatical-case   (511 words)

  
 Pronouns (Pronoun Case)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
The possessive case pronoun is used to show ownership.
While a possessive adjective may modify a noun, a possessive pronoun replaces the adjective and the noun with a single word.
Possessive pronouns allow you to reduce repetition and wordiness in your sentences.
owlet.letu.edu /grammarlinks/pronouns/pronoun3d4.html   (91 words)

  
 8 Case theory
Before addressing our main concern---how objective case is licensed on the embedded subject her, we digress briefly to provide an independent piece of evidence in favor of the structure in (35), which is based on the distribution of expletive there.
Possessive case on the lower DP is checked by the possessive morpheme 's, being licensed by the spec-head relation between them.
Case licensing is a relationship between a head and an 'outside' noun phrase (that is, a noun phrase distinct from any projections of the case-checking head).
www.ling.upenn.edu /courses/ling150/ch8.html   (6654 words)

  
 Possessive Nouns: The Apostrophe
The possessive case of nouns in English is formed by using an apostrophe plus the letter s or only an apostrophe.
In such instances, though, we should try to avoid using the possessive case altogether and write: the teachings of Jesus, the laws of Moses, the plays of Sophocles.
Here, we are still using the possessive shorthand as a substitute for the "of" or "for" phrase even though the situation does not involve true possession.
www.grammarmudge.cityslide.com /articles/article/426348/4944.htm   (631 words)

  
 Noun and Pronoun Characteristics
You use the subject case for a noun or pronoun which stands alone, is the subject of a clause, is the subject complement, or stands in apposition to any of these.
You use the object case for the object of a preposition, a verb, or a verbal, or for any noun or pronoun which stands in apposition to one of these.
You use the possessive case for any noun or pronoun which acts an an adjective, implicitly or explicitly modifying another element in the sentence.
www.uottawa.ca /academic/arts/writcent/hypergrammar/nounchar.html   (585 words)

  
 Learn English Free and Fast - Possessive/Genitive Case
The possessive case is used especially to indicate a relation of ownership or association.
Both nouns and pronouns are inflected in the possessive case.
The noun "door" is the nominative case because it's the thing which is open -- it's the subject of the verb "is".
www.zozanga.com /grammar/casepossgen.htm   (152 words)

  
 Possessive pronoun - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A possessive pronoun is a word that attributes ownership to someone or something without using a noun.
In Finnish, for example, possessive suffixes or declining the standard pronoun in the genitive case is used instead, as in minun "I's", meaning "my".
These possessive pronouns are called independent, because they constitute full noun phrases and don't depend on a noun, i.e.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Possessive_pronoun   (347 words)

  
 Possessive / Instrumental Cases   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
The possessive case is added to nouns to indicate that the noun has ownership or possession of something.
The possessive case may also be formed by adding the suffix -இன்.
The instrumental case is added to nouns to mean "with the use of", "because of", or "by means of".
www.ibiblio.org /tamil/paadanool/unicode/lesson25.html   (138 words)

  
 Possessive case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Possessive case is a case that exists in some languages usedfor possession.
It is not the same as the genitive case, though the twohave proximal meanings in many languages.
The term 'possessive case' is often used to refer to the "'s" morpheme, which issuffixed onto many nouns in English to denote 'possession by'.
www.therfcc.org /possessive-case-81105.html   (239 words)

  
 8 Case theory
We begin by illustrating the basic purpose of case, which is to identify a noun phrase's function or grammatical relation in the sentence (for instance, whether a noun phrase is a subject or object).
Each case feature has a value that is selected from among all the various case forms in that language (regardless of whether the case forms are expressed synthetically or analytically).
In languages with a dative-accusative distinction, case checking in VP shells and small clauses is a bit more involved than in English, and we therefore defer discussion of these constructions in these languages until the end of the chapter.
www.ling.upenn.edu /~beatrice/syntax-textbook/ch8.html   (7840 words)

  
 Pronoun Case: Basics
The nominative case personal pronouns are: I, you (singular), he, she, it, we, you (plural), and they.
case.* The possessive case pronouns are: my or mine, your or yours (singular), his, her or hers, its, our or ours, your or yours, and their or theirs.
Thus, the pronoun is in the objective case.
www.grammarmudge.cityslide.com /articles/article/2569239/35965.htm   (739 words)

  
 What is a Noun?
In the possessive case, a noun or pronoun changes its form to show that it owns or is closely related to something else.
Here the possessive noun "miner's" is used to modify the noun "face" and together with the article "the," they make up the noun phrase that is the sentence's subject.
In this sentence the possessive noun "squirrels"' is used to modify the noun "nest" and the noun phrase "the squirrels' nest" is the object of the infinitive phrase "to locate."
www.uottawa.ca /academic/arts/writcent/hypergrammar/nouns.html   (1986 words)

  
 Dative case - Open Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
The dative case is a grammatical case for nouns and/or pronouns.
Other uses include possession, as in Vulgar Latin and, to a lesser extent, Classical Latin; also, in Classical Greek, which has lost the locative and instrumental cases, the dative assumes these functions.
The pronoun whom is also a remnant of the dative case in English, descending from the Old English dative pronoun "hwām" (as opposed to the nominative "who", which descends from Old English "hwā") — though "whom" also absorbed the functions of the Old English accusative pronoun "hwone".
open-encyclopedia.com /Dative_case   (334 words)

  
 0042Accusative case of possessive adjectives   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Possessive adjectives that accompany masculine inanimate nouns have the same forms as in the nominative case.
Possessive adjectives that accompany masculine animate nouns in the accusative case have the same forms as in the genitive.
The feminine forms of the possessive adjectives in the accusative case are:
www.auburn.edu /~mitrege/RWT/tutorials/0042acc-possess-adj.html   (55 words)

  
 Quenya Possessive - UniLang Wiki   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
In this case the girl was the present owner of the book at the moment of the sentence, but it is quite possible that at this moment she no longer owns it.
When we use a possessive case the material from which the crown is made is emphasized (just as can be seen by the English translations).
In situation 6 of the usage of the genitive case we have seen that the words after the preposition "about" are in the genitive.
home.unilang.org /wiki3/index.php?title=Quenya_Possessive   (636 words)

  
 Advanced Quenya & other Forms of Elvish
The case in -o or -on that we discussed in the previous lesson is referred to simply as the "genitive" in several sources.
On the previous page, he noted regarding the case with the ending -o(n) that "properly it was used partitively, or to describe the source or origin, not as a 'possessive'" (emphasis added).
So the possessive case may indicate simple ownership at the time that is being considered (past or present – whereas origin, or former possession, is indicated by the genitive case).
groups.msn.com /AdvancedQuenyaotherFormsofElvish/lesson12.msnw   (1582 words)

  
 Grammar Handbook: Noun and Pronoun Case
Case refers to how nouns and pronouns are used in relation to the other words in a sentence.
The three cases are subjective, objective, and possessive.
A noun or pronoun is in the objective case when it is used as a direct object, an indirect object, or an object of the preposition.
www.english.uiuc.edu /cws/wworkshop/writer_resources/grammar_handbook/noun_pronoun_case.htm   (142 words)

  
 Daily Grammar
Case means that a different form of a pronoun is used for different parts of the sentence.
Possessive case pronouns are my, mine, your, yours, his, her, hers, its, our, ours, your, yours, their and theirs.
Do not confuse the possessive personal pronouns its, your, and their with the contractions it's (it is, it has), you're (you are), and they're (they are).
www.dailygrammar.com /141to145.shtml   (951 words)

  
 CHAPTER IV - POSSESSIVE CASE
He was politely informed that both were incorrect; that the two words form their plurals differently, and that the possessive case is, therefore, formed in a different manner.
In the latter case we are obliged to place the apostrophe after the s in order to distinguish the possessive plural from the possessive singular.
Nouns whose plurals are formed otherwise than by adding s or es, form their possessive case by adding the apostrophe and s, just as nouns in the singular do; as, men's, women's, children's, seraphim's.
www.globusz.com /ebooks/Speech/00000019.htm   (835 words)

  
 Possessive Forms
Possessive forms are frequently modifiers for verb forms used as nouns, or gerunds.
When a possessive noun is followed by an appositive, a word that renames or explains that noun, the apostrophe +s is added to the appositive, not to the noun.
The double possessive construction is sometimes called the "post-genitive" or "of followed by a possessive case or an absolute possessive pronoun" (from the Oxford English Dictionary, which likes to show off).
grammar.ccc.commnet.edu /grammar/possessives.htm   (1651 words)

  
 CASE NOUNS / Case is an inflection or use of a noun / LousyWriter.com teaches you how to write better and how to write ...
Case is an inflection or use of a noun (or pronoun) to show its relation to other words in the sentence.
There are now only two case forms of English nouns,—one for the nominative and objective, one for the possessive: consequently the matter of inflection is a very easy thing to handle in learning about cases.
Occasionally the s is dropped in the possessive singular if the word ends in a hissing sound and another hissing sound follows, but the apostrophe remains to mark the possessive; as, for goodness' sake, Cervantes' satirical work.
www.lousywriter.com /nouns_case.php   (1763 words)

  
 Genitive case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
The genitive case is an adjectival form of a noun that shows some sort of relationship between itself and what it describes.
It is a common misconception that English nouns have a genitive case, marked by the possessive -'s ending.
Linguists generally believe that English possessive is no longer a case at all, but has become a clitic, an independent particle which, however, is always written and pronounced as part of the preceding word.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/g/ge/genitive_case.html   (440 words)

  
 Case
The case of a pronoun indicates whether the pronoun initiates the action (e.g., subjective case), receives the action (e.g., objective case) or conveys ownership (e.g., possessive case).
The case of a relative pronoun (who, whom, which, that) is determined by how the relative pronoun is used in the dependent clause.
Possessive case, which indicates that the pronoun is showing ownership.
grammar.uoregon.edu /case/case.html   (376 words)

  
 possessive case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Alienability refers to the ability to dissociate something from its parent -- in this case, a quality from its owner.
When something is inalienably possessed, it is usually an attribute: for example, John's big nose is inalienably possessed, because it cannot (without surgery) be removed from John -- it's simply a quality he has.
This usage is not strictly correct -- this affix is actually a clitic.
www.yourencyclopedia.net /possessive_case.html   (294 words)

  
 ENGLISH CASE
As in Latin, so in English "case" refers to a change in the form of a word which indicates how that word is used in a sentence, that is, how it relates syntactically to other words in the sentence.
In English, the only words that are marked formally are pronouns and the "declension" of pronouns shows three cases: The subject case, the object case, and the possessive case.
The possessive case only really exists in English in the personal pronouns: my, mine; your, yours; his, her, hers, its; our, ours, your, yours, and their, theirs.
omega.cohums.ohio-state.edu /latin/grammar/english_cases.htm   (730 words)

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