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Topic: Postalveolar consonant


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In the News (Wed 26 Nov 14)

  
  Postalveolar consonant:   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Postalveolar consonants are consonants articulated with the tongue near or touching the back of the alveolar ridge, placing them a bit further back in the mouth than the alveolar consonants, which are at the ridge itself, but not as far back as the hard palate (the place of articulation for palatal consonants).
The alveolo-palatal and retroflex consonants are also postalveolar in their point of articulation, but they are given separate columns in the IPA chart, and illustrated with examples in their own articles.
There is an additional postalveolar articulation found in Circassian languages such as Ubyx: the tip of the tongue rests against the lower teeth so that there is no sublingual cavity.
wikipedia.openfun.org /wiki/Postalveolar_consonant   (495 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Bilabial consonant   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Alveolars are consonants articulated with the tip of the tongue against the alveolar ridge, the internal side of the upper gums (known as the alveoles of the upper teeth).
Postalveolar (or palato-alveolar) consonants are consonants articulated with the tip of the tongue between the alveolar ridge (the place of articulation for alveolar consonants) and the palate (the place of articulation for palatal consonants).
Glottal consonants are consonants articulated with the glottis.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Bilabial-consonant   (1197 words)

  
 Voiced postalveolar affricate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Its place of articulation is palato-alveolar, that is, domed postalveolar, which means it is articulated with the tip of the tongue bunched up ("domed") between the alveolar ridge and the palate.
It is a central consonant, which means it is produced by allowing the airstream to flow over the middle of the tongue, rather than the sides.
The voiceless postalveolar affricate occurs in English, and it is the sound denoted by the letter 'g' in giraffe and the letter 'j' in jump.
www.sevenhills.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Voiced_postalveolar_affricate   (293 words)

  
 Ilya Writing
In the cases of vowel pairs the first vowel is a spread vowel, where the corners of the mouth are held far apart, and the second is a rounded vowel, where the lips are held in an "o" shape.
With consonant pairs, the first is unvoiced (no vocal cord vibration), the second is voiced, said exactly the same way, but with the vocal cords vibrating.
Postalveolar Consonant/Approximant, where the tongue is plased at the margin of the alveolar ridge and the palate.
homepage.mac.com /pfhreak/ilya/writing/letters.html   (548 words)

  
 Postalveolar consonant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Postalveolar consonants are consonants articulated with the tongue between the alveolar ridge (the place of articulation for alveolar consonants) and the palate (the place of articulation for palatal consonants).
The alveolo-palatal and retroflex consonants are also postalveolar in their point of articulation, but they are given separate columns in the IPA chart.
The difference between palato-alveolar, alveolo-palatal, and retroflex is in the shape of the tongue rather than the place of articulation: in palato-alveolars, like English sh, the tongue is bunched-up ("domed"); in alveolo-palatals, like Mandarin x, the tongue is flat ("laminal"), and in retroflex consonants like Mandarin sh, the tip of the tongue is raised ("apical").
www.sevenhills.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Postalveolar_consonant   (216 words)

  
 POSTALVEOLAR CONSONANT FACTS AND INFORMATION
Postalveolar consonants are consonants articulated with the tongue near or touching the ''back'' of the alveolar_ridge, placing them a bit further back in the mouth than the alveolar_consonants, which are at the ridge itself, but not as far back as the hard palate (the place of articulation for palatal_consonants).
Ladefoged has called this a "''closed'' laminal postalveolar" articulation; Catford describes the fricatives as "hissing-hushing" sounds, and transcribes them as (''note: this is not IPA notation'').
Also, Ladefoged has resurrected an obsolete IPA symbol, the under dot, to indicate ''apical postalveolar'' (normally included in the category of retroflex_consonants), and that notation is used here.
www.mrspell.com /Postalveolar_consonant   (474 words)

  
 Coronal - KutjaraWiki   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Coronal consonants are those articulated with the tongue in the front part of the mouth.
Coronal consonants are often considered together; for instance, the IPA only has a separate symbol for each place of articulation in the case of the coronal fricatives.
Retroflex consonants are omitted, as they are written in the IPA simply by modifying the basic coronal consonant symbol with a "retroflex hook"; in X-Sampa, the equivalent of this is the retroflex diacritic
www.kutjara.com /wiki/index.php?title=Coronal   (315 words)

  
 iqexpand.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
The voiceless postalveolar fricative is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages.
The voiceless postalveolar fricative occurs in English, and it is the sound denoted by the letters "sh" in shoe, the letters "ss" in passion, or the letters "ti" in donation.
Its place of articulation is postalveolar which means it is articulated with the tip of the tongue between the alveolar ridge and the palate, but closer to the alveolar ridge than for alveolo-palatal consonants.
voiceless_postalveolar_fricative.iqexpand.com   (520 words)

  
 Place of articulation
In speech, consonants may have different places of articulation, generally with full or partial stoppage of the airstream.
Postalveolar, between the palatal ridge and tongue, behind alveolar position
Spanish written "l" vs. "ll"; Hindi with dental, palatal, and retroflex laterals; and numerous Native American languages with not only lateral approximants, but also lateral fricatives and affricates.
www.starrepublic.org /encyclopedia/wikipedia/p/pl/place_of_articulation.html   (450 words)

  
 International Phonetic Alphabet Online Research :: Information about International Phonetic Alphabet   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
For instance, a Flap consonant and a tap are two different articulations, but since no language has (yet) been found to make a phonemic distinction between them, the IPA does not provide them with dedicated symbols.
Nasal consonant     Bilabial nasal     Labiodental nasal     Alveolar nasal     Retroflex nasal     Palatal nasal     Velar nasal     Uvular nasal  
Voiceless alveolo-palatal fricative Voiceless palatalized postalveolar (alveolo-palatal) fricative
www.carolinamaps.net /search/IPA.html   (4521 words)

  
 Consonant
The word consonant comes from Latin meaning "sounding with" or "sounding together", the idea being that consonants don't sound on their own, but only occur with a nearby vowel, although this conception of consonants does not reflect a modern linguistic understanding of consonants, which defines consonants in terms of vocal tract constrictions.
The letter Y stands for a consonant in "yoke" but for a vowel in "myth".
In music, a stable interval or chord is consonant, this property being consonance, the opposite of dissonance.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/consonant   (573 words)

  
 Uvular consonant - Open Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Most uvular consonants are either stops or fricatives, but a very small number of languages use them as nasals, trills, or approximants.
The uvular consonants identified by the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) are:
Uvular consonants are found in many African and Middle-Eastern languages, most notably Arabic, and in Native American languages.
open-encyclopedia.com /Uvular   (402 words)

  
 Bambooweb: Palatal
Consonants with other primary articulations may be palatalised, that is, accompanied by the raising of the tongue surface towards the hard palate.
For example, English [S] (spelled sh) has such a palatal component, although its primary articulation involves the tip of the tongue and the upper gum (this type of articulation is called palatoalveolar).
The palatal consonants identified by the International Phonetic Alphabet are:
www.bambooweb.com /articles/p/a/Palatal.html   (105 words)

  
 iqexpand.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Fricative consonant Fricative consonants are produced by air flowing through a narrow channel made by placing two articulating organs close together (e.g.
Funnyandquot; is pronounced as andquot;punnyandquot; andquot;Jumpandquot; is pronounced as andquot;dumpandquot; A fricative consonant (/f/ /v/ /s/ /z/, 'sh', 'zh', 'th' or /h/), or an affricate consonant ('ch' or /j/) is replaced...
Fricative consonant 0.00039723 Glottis 0.00039001 Velar consonant 0.00038741 Dental consonant 0.00038189 Kirshenbaum 0.00035095 Palatal consonant 0.00034633 Lung 0.00032848 Bilabial consonant 0.00032637 Oral...
fricative_consonant.iqexpand.com   (440 words)

  
 Velar consonant article - Velar consonant Places articulation Labial consonant Bilabial consonant Labiodental - ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Velars are consonants articulated with the back part of the tongue (the dorsum) against the soft palate (the back part of the roof of the mouth, known also as the velum).
The velar consonants identified by the International Phonetic Alphabet are:
Intervocalic 'g' in Spanish often described instead as a very lightly articulated voiced velar fricative.
www.what-means.com /encyclopedia/Velar   (212 words)

  
 Dental consonant article - Dental consonant Places articulation Labial consonant Bilabial consonant Labiodental - ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Dentals are consonants articulated with either the lower or the upper teeth, or both.
The alveolar consonants identified by the International Phonetic Alphabet are:
Dental consonant article - Dental consonant definition - what means Dental consonant
www.what-means.com /encyclopedia/Dental   (98 words)

  
 Describing consonants   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Which consonant you're pronouncing depends on where in the vocal tract the constriction is and how narrow it is. It also depends on a few other things, such as whether the vocal folds are vibrating and whether air is flowing through the nose.
In a postalveolar consonant, the constriction is made immediately behind the alveolar ridge.
It is often useful to display the consonants of a language in the form of a chart.
www.umanitoba.ca /linguistics/russell/138/2001/artic/describing-consonants.html   (1375 words)

  
 CONK! Encyclopedia: List_of_linguistic_topics   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
naming - nasal consonant - natural language - natural language processing - natural language understanding - neologism - neurolinguistics - nominative case - noun - noun phrase - null morpheme
radical - regimen - retroflex consonant - retronym - rhotics - romanization - rounded vowel
V2 word order - variety - velar consonant - verb - verb object subject - verb phrase - verb subject object - verbal noun - Verner's law - vocative case - vowel - vowel harmony - vowel stems -
www.conk.com /search/encyclopedia.cgi?q=List_of_linguistic_topics   (529 words)

  
 Coronal consonant - TheBestLinks.com - Tongue, Tooth, Dental consonant, Alveolar consonant, ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Coronal consonant, Tongue, Tooth, Dental consonant, Alveolar consonant, Palate...
Coronal consonants are articulated with the tip or the front part of the tongue against the upper teeth, the upper gum (the alveolar ridge), or the part of the hard palate just behind it.
The term covers a wide range of pronunciations, including dental, alveolar, and postalveolar consonants.
www.thebestlinks.com /Coronal_consonant.html   (124 words)

  
 Postalveolar consonant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Some languages which distinguish "dental" vs. "alveolar" stops have something closer to prealveolar and postalveolar.
However, in some non-standard forms of Malayalam, there is a laminal postalveolar nasal that contrasts with apical alveolar, palatal, and subapical retroflex nasals: m n̟ n͇ n̠ ɳ ɲ ŋ.
This page was last modified 18:33, 7 October 2005.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Postalveolar_consonant   (592 words)

  
 Front vowel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
The defining characteristic of a front vowel is that the tongue is positioned as far forward as possible in the mouth without creating a constriction that would be classified as a consonant.
In some languages, the open front vowels do not pattern or group with the other front vowels in their phonologies.
In the phonology of many Indo-European languages, front vowels have a special effect on certain preceding palatal consonants, bringing them forward to alveolar or postalveolar consonant sounds.
bucyrus.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Front_vowel   (219 words)

  
 Palate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
The name is probably derived from the Latin palatum.
When functioning in conjunction with other parts of the mouth the palate produces certain sounds, particularly velar, palatal, palatalized, postalveolar, and alveolo-palatal consonants.
It plays a role in a guttural consonants, together with the throat, tongue, and uvula.
www.bexley.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Palate   (146 words)

  
 Information on Voiceless bilabial plosive   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Its Manner of articulation is Stop consonant or stop, which means it is produced by obstructing airflow in the vocal tract.
Its Place of articulation is Bilabial consonant which means it is articulated with both Lip.
Trill consonant Bilabial trill Alveolar trill Retroflex trill Uvular trill Epiglottal trill   Ejective consonant   Bilabial ejective Alveolar ejective Velar ejective Uvular ejective Alveolar ejective fricative
www.information-resource.net /search/Voiceless_bilabial_plosive.html   (881 words)

  
 Curiosities of the Polish spelling   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
A voice of a professional linguist on the Polish spelling.
Hence the presence of the ~ii ending in inflexional forms of the word is an indication concerning its pronunciation (and vice versa) since the spelling permits such an ending only in words with the consonant [j] pronounced (in the case of żmii also written in other forms: żmija).
A next serious spelling difficulty is preserving of spelling of voiced and voiceless consonants in accordance to their origin, and not their pronunciation.
grzegorj.w.interia.pl /gram/isoen/osobl.html   (4281 words)

  
 Read about Labiodental consonant at WorldVillage Encyclopedia. Research Labiodental consonant and learn about ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
IPA, which may not display correctly in some browsers.
consonants articulated with the lower lips and the upper teeth, or viceversa.
The labiodental consonants identified by the International Phonetic Alphabet are:
encyclopedia.worldvillage.com /s/b/Labiodental_consonant   (94 words)

  
 Standard Cantonese - Chinese linguistics and dialect - Chinese
Below is the phonology accepted by most scholars and educators, the one usually heard on TV or radio in serious broadcast like news reports.
Initial (linguistics)Initials (or onsets) are initial consonants of possible syllables.
The voice distinction was found in Middle Chinese and has been lost in Cantonese, preserved only by tone differences.
www.famouschinese.com /virtual/Standard_Cantonese   (1288 words)

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