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Topic: Proclamation of 1763


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  Proclamation of 1763
In the fall of 1763, a royal decree was issued that prohibited the North American colonists from establishing or maintaining settlements west of an imaginary line running down the crest of the Appalachian Mountains.
The Proclamation of 1763 was a well-intentioned measure.
The King and his council presented the proclamation as a measure to calm the fears of proclamation of 1763 did much to dampen that celebration.
www.u-s-history.com /pages/h1209.html   (745 words)

  
  Royal Proclamation of 1763 - Open Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
The proclamation established requirements that had to be met before aboriginal land could be purchased, including one that the purchase must be approved by a meeting of all members of the people selling the land.
Thus, the boundary line established by the proclamation (often called the proclamation line) was not intended to be a permanent boundary between white and Indian lands (as is sometimes believed), but rather a temporary boundary which could be extended further west in an orderly, lawful manner.
After the American Revolutionary War, the Royal Proclamation of 1763 became a dead letter in the United States, but continued in force in Rupert's Land, which later became part of Canada.
www.open-encyclopedia.com /Royal_Proclamation_of_1763   (388 words)

  
 Proclamation of 1763 - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Proclamation of 1763
Proclamation by King George III that prohibited Europeans from settling on land west of the Appalachian Mountains.
The proclamation gave Americans Indians land titles for the first time, but angered American colonists who felt Britain was interfering with their right to govern their own lands.
The proclamation was in large part a reaction to fear of American Indian hostilities, as seen in the start of Pontiac's War 1763–65.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /Proclamation+of+1763   (170 words)

  
 Royal Proclamation of 1763   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
The Royal Proclamation of 1763 was issued by King George III to establish a basis of government administration in the N American territories formally ceded by France to Britain in the Treaty of PARIS, 1763, following the SEVEN YEARS' WAR.
The Royal Proclamation thereby established the British Crown as the essential central agent in the transfer of Indian lands to colonial settlers.
Although these regions had been specifically designated in 1763 as outside the jurisdictional framework put in place by the Royal Proclamation, Canadian government officials recognized that the native peoples of the newly annexed territory had the same rights to their unceded ancestral lands as Indians in the UC area prior to the negotiation of treaties.
www.canadianencyclopedia.ca /index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&ArticleId=A0006990   (1099 words)

  
 Royal Proclamation of 1763 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Royal Proclamation of 1763 was issued October 7, 1763 by the British government in the name of King George III to prohibit settlement by colonists beyond the Appalachian Mountains in the lands captured by Britain from France in the French and Indian War/Seven Years' War and to end exploitative purchases of American Indian land.
Eastern North America in 1775, including the line of the Royal Proclamation of 1763.
After the American Revolutionary War, the Royal Proclamation of 1763 became a dead letter in the United States, but continued to govern the cession of aboriginal land in British North America, especially Upper Canada and Rupert's Land.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Proclamation_of_1763   (441 words)

  
 The Proclamation of 1763 - The Archivist - Publications - Library and Archives Canada   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
Although treaties between the Indians and the colonial officials were reached prior to the Royal Proclamation of 1763, the latter served as a model for the establishment of such arrangements.
In the Proclamation of 1763, King George III of England declared a British system of governing in the areas that had been surrendered by France, and pronounced that the Indians and their lands would be treated with respect.
There are several transcribed copies of both the October 7, 1763, document proclaimed by the King in England and the one later pronounced by the Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Sir William Johnson, in North America on December 24, 1763; the National Archives also has a negative photostat of this latter document.
www.archives.ca /04/042402_e.html   (1089 words)

  
 CD 2 Chapter 9 Question B   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
Insofar as it related to Aboriginal peoples, the intent of the Royal Proclamation of 1763 was to facilitate the continuation of British settlement in North America while at the same time avoiding war with the Indian nations and conflict over land on the frontier (Boldt, 1993, 37).
The proclamation affirmed that title to all lands was vested in the British Crown, but declared that any land the Crown had not yet acquired by treaty or purchase was to be reserved for the Indians.
The proclamation thus recognized that Indian peoples had the right to occupy and use the land which they had not ceded or sold to Britain, and furthermore established that this right could only be extinguished by the Crown [glossary] in return for reasonable compensation (Dickason, 1997, 161-62).
www.queensu.ca /politics/polscd/reviewq/CD2C9/CD2C9qB.html   (252 words)

  
 Proclamation of 1763   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
Royal Proclamation of 1763 The declaration by the King of England that set the boundaries of lands in North America, including Nova Scotia, for settlement by colonists and set apart that land that was held by the Indian nations.
Emancipation Proclamation Time line of events that led up to the Emancipation Proclamation which abolished slavery in the United States.
Emancipation Proclamation (1863) Text of Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation that abolished slavery in the United States.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Proclamation_of_1763.html   (255 words)

  
 British Royal Proclamation of 1763   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
The proclamation was largely ignored on theground (in particular in settlements already established in the prohibited area) but its very existence created a large amount ofresentment among the British colonists (especially in Virginia) and was one of thefactors leading to the American RevolutionaryWar.
After the American Revolutionary War, theRoyal Proclamation of 1763 became a dead letter in the United States, butcontinued in force in Rupert's Land, which later became part of Canada.
The proclamation forms the basis of land claims of aboriginal peoples in Canada– First Nations, Inuit, and Métis.
www.therfcc.org /british-royal-proclamation-of-1763-43375.html   (418 words)

  
 proclamation
The proclamation declared \"that all persons held as slaves\" within the rebellious states \"are, and henceforward shall be free.\".
The Ryoal Proclamation, 1763, which announced the acquisition of the territory of New France, to be renamed to Quebec.
USA-project, presidents-area, Abraham Lincoln, The Emancipation Proclamation (1863).
www.jointctr.org /?Category=proclamation   (237 words)

  
 REGINA v. WHITE AND BOB
This was the purpose and the substance of the Royal Proclamation of 1763.
The Proclamation is to be construed in accordance with the common understanding of the British expansionists of those days, who claimed the extension of dominion not in the terms of precise definition or of survey or of British settlement.
The Proclamation was made on the basis of a claim to dominion and its protective provisions be- came applicable in fact to Indians as their lands (the Indian Territory) came under the de facto dominion of representa- tives of the British Crown.
library.usask.ca /native/cnlc/vol06/629.html   (15393 words)

  
 British Royal Proclamation of 1763   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
The Royal Proclamation of 1763 was issued by the British government in the name of King George III to prohibit settlement by British colonists beyond the Appalachian Mountains in the lands captured by Britain France in the French and Indian War / Seven Years' War and to end exploitative purchases of land.
The proclamation was largely ignored on ground (in particular in settlements already established the prohibited area) but its very existence a large amount of resentment among the colonists (especially in Virginia) and was one of the factors to the American Revolutionary War.
The Royal Proclamation of 1763 is in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
www.freeglossary.com /Royal_Proclamation_of_1763   (566 words)

  
 Law Abstracts Hutchings
The Royal Proclamation of 1763, as a law of constitutional significance and manifestly universal application, it is argued, applied to British Columbia, if not as of its enactment in 1763, then either upon the assertion of British Sovereignty over that area or by virtue of the Colonial Laws Validity Act, 1865.
Further it is argued that the proclamation enjoyed the force and effect of an Imperial statute in the colonies to which it applied.
In order to understand fully the import of the Royal Proclamation in the colonies it is necessary to understand British constitutional rules governing the nature and exercise of the Sovereign's prerogative legislative and executive powers in newly acquired territories and the rules governing the Imperial law to which the colonies are subject.
www.library.ubc.ca /law/abstracts/hutchings.html   (670 words)

  
 Canada in the Making - Aboriginals: Treaties & Relations   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
In 1763, the Royal Proclamation was created to integrate New France into the British Empire in North American.
The Royal Proclamation hints at the reason: it notes that British interests were, prior to 1763, responsible for "great fraud and abuses" in obtaining land from Aboriginals that had caused the latter "great dissatisfaction".
Thus, they ensured that any future negotiation with the Aboriginals was to be in done in public by representatives of the British crown, and that the final results of such negotiations would be recorded in written treaties.
www.canadiana.org /citm/themes/aboriginals/aboriginals3_e.html   (748 words)

  
 [No title]
Pontiac Indian Chief; led post war flare-up in the Ohio River Valley and Great Lakes Region in 1763; his actions led to the Proclamation of 1763; the Proclamation angered the colonists.
Proclamation of 1763 The Proclamation of 1763 was an English law enacted after gaining territory from the French at the end of the French and Indian War.
The Proclamation of 1763 caused the first major revolt against the British.
www.course-notes.org /Vocab/chpt6.doc   (511 words)

  
 USA: French and Indian War IV
the Proclamation of 1763 had a significant effect on the attitudes of the colonials toward the British.
After the French and Indian War and the treaty of Paris, the Proclamation of 1763 was one of the first documents issued to govern the colonies.
The proclamations misinterpretation was a big key to the view of the colonials.
odur.let.rug.nl /usa.990917/E/fiwar/french04.htm   (351 words)

  
 The Proclamation Line
To the dismay of the colonial leaders, who expected the defeat of France to increase access to the lands in the Ohio River valley, George III issued the the Royal Proclamation of 1763.
The Proclamation created 4 new colonies from the lands ceded by the French in the 1763 peace treaty.
George III's Proclamation Line may have been consistent with modern "smart growth" principles, but the speculators in the colonies placed a higher priority on increasing their personal wealth rather than reducing the overall coat of government.
www.virginiaplaces.org /settleland/proclamation.html   (493 words)

  
 Virtual Law Office: Royal Proclamation of 1763
Settlers from the Thirteen Colonies were anxious to move into the Ohio Valley now that it was free of French influence, but the lands were still in the possession of Indian Nations who were rightly suspicious of 'Yankee' motives and resented their intrusion.
The Crown used the Quebec Act, 1774 as a device to re-assert its control within the Proclamation lands by extending the former boundaries of Quebec down to the Ohio River near what is now Pittsburgh, then down the Ohio the Mississippi and north to Rupert's Land.
The Proclamation is not formally part of the Constitution of Canada, but it is referred to in section 25 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
www.bloorstreet.com /200block/rp1763.htm   (1022 words)

  
 [No title]
Thus, Part II of the Proclamation permitted the Governor of Quebec to "settle and agree" with the inhabitants of the province for such lands as "are now or hereafter shall be in Our power to dispose of".
The Royal Proclamation of 1763 was officially promulgated within the new Province of Quebec by Governor James Murray.
This is reflected in the Royal Proclamation of 1763.
www.cwis.org /fwdp/Americas/algonqin.txt   (8400 words)

  
 Digital History
Beginning in 1763, successive British ministries made a series of political missteps that gradually stirred the colonists to assert American liberties against British oppression.
Before 1763, the colonists largely accepted Parliament's right to take actions on their behalf--and even the primacy of England's economic interests over their own.
But the Proclamation of 1763 reserved lands west of the Appalachian mountains for Indians and forbade white settlement there.
www.digitalhistory.uh.edu /documents/documents_p2.cfm?doc=247   (332 words)

  
 1763, Proclamation of --  Encyclopædia Britannica
proclamation declared by the British crown at the end of the French and Indian War in North America, mainly intended to conciliate the Indians by checking the encroachment of white settlers on their lands.
The treaty of 1763 ending this war made England master of Canada and of the land between the Appalachian Mountains and the Mississippi River.
Exhibition of the proclamation, made in January 1, 1863 by President Abraham Lincoln, for the freedom of all slaves in America, at the National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C. The Construction of the Proclamation
www.britannica.com /eb/article?eu=68682   (728 words)

  
 REGINA v. DERRIKSAN
Counsel for the appellant's argument is based on the premise that the Indian tribes of British Columbia acquired aboriginal title to the lands which the various tribes used and occupied for generations in the past and that one attribute of that aboriginal title is the right to hunt and fish on tribal lands.
The wording of the Proclamation indicated that it was intended to include the lands west of the Rocky Mountains.
Although I think that it is clear that Indian title in British Columbia cannot owe its origin to the Proclamation of 1763, the fact is that when the settlers came, the Indians were there, organized in societies and occupying the lands as their forefathers had done for centuries.
library.usask.ca /native/cnlc/vol09/496.html   (3856 words)

  
 Day 1
After the discussion, students will be able to define the Proclamation of 1763, the Stamp Act of 1765, the Townshend Acts, and the Tea Act of 1773 with 100% accuracy.
The revolt was defeated but because of this the Proclamation of 1763 was issued.
-The proclamation said that white settlers were not allowed to settle to the west of the Appalachian Mountains.
www.thecoo.edu /~masemm/day_1.htm   (813 words)

  
 Cow Creek/Umpqua Tribe: Canadian Treaties   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
In the one hundred years subsequent to this Proclamation, the differences between the history of the Crown and the Indian tribes in Canada, and that of the federal government and the tribes in the United States following the Revolution, are substantial.
A summary of the background to, and the expectations of, the Royal Proclamation of 1763 may be seen in Nichols (1998, pp.
As a clear reference to the syntax of the Royal Proclamation of 1763, a note at the beginning of the index states: "It is understood that surrenders are made to the Crown unless it is otherwise stated" (p.
www.cowcreek.com /govt/gr12_canadiantreaties.html   (3084 words)

  
 Proclamation Of 1763 Encyclopedia Article, Definition, History, Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
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