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Topic: Proleptic Julian calendar


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In the News (Thu 31 Jul 14)

  
  Proleptic Gregorian Calendar: Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com
This Julian in proleptic Julian calendar and Julian year refers to Julius Caesar, who..., 1582 C.E. in the Gregorian Calendar, which is the date before the day on which the Gregorian...
The proleptic Gregorian calendar is produced by extending the Gregorian Calendar to dates preceding its official introduction.
Likewise, the Proleptic Julian Calendar is used to specify dates before its official introduction in 45 BC.
www.encyclopedian.com /pr/Proleptic-Gregorian-calendar.html   (356 words)

  
 CalendarHome.com - Julian calendar - Calendar Encyclopedia
The Julian calendar was in general use in Europe from the times of the Roman Empire until 1582, when Pope Gregory XIII promulgated the Gregorian Calendar, which was soon adopted by most Catholic countries.
Russia remained on the Julian calendar until after the Russian Revolution (which is thus called the 'October Revolution' but occurred in November according to the Gregorian calendar), in 1917, while Greece continued to use it until 1923.
A revised Julian calendar was proposed during a synod in Constantinople in May of 1923, consisting of a solar part which was and will be identical to the Gregorian calendar until the year 2800, and a lunar part which calculated Easter astronomically at Jerusalem.
encyclopedia.calendarhome.com /Julian_calendar.htm   (2559 words)

  
 Julian date
The Julian Day (JD) or Julian Day Number is the time that has elapsed since noon January 1, 4713 BC[?] (according to the proleptic Julian calendar; or November 24, 4714 BC according to the proleptic Gregorian calendar), expressed in days and fractions of a day.
This "Julian" in "proleptic Julian calendar" and "Julian year" refers to Julius Caesar, who introduced the Julian calendar in 46 BC.
Julian dates are typically used by astronomers to calculate astronomical events, and eliminate the complications resulting from using standard calendar periods.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ju/Julian_day_number.html   (657 words)

  
 Hebrew calendar
This is in contrast to the Gregorian calendar, which is based solely upon a solar cycle, or the Islamic calendar, which is purely lunar.
Jews use this calendar to determine when the new Hebrew months start; this calendar determines the Jewish holidays, which Torah portions to read, and which set of Psalms should be read each day.
The epoch of the modern Hebrew calendar is Monday, October 7, 3761 BCE, being the tabular date (same daylight period) in the proleptic Julian calendar corresponding to 1 Tishri AM 1 (AM = Anno Mundi = in the year of the world).
publicliterature.org /en/wikipedia/h/he/hebrew_calendar_1.html   (1371 words)

  
 Calendar Conversions   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Julian dates may be applied both before the calendar was invented (proleptic) and after it was replaced as long as it is clear that the Julian leap year rules are being applied.
The Julian Day Number or JD of a particular instant of time is the number of days and fractions of a day since 12 hours Universal Time (Greenwich mean noon) on January 1, -4712, in the Julian proleptic calendar.
The Hebrew calendar is the official calendar of Israel and it is the liturgical calendar of the Jewish faith.
www.geocities.com /atkuala/astro/cal_conversion.html   (423 words)

  
 Learn more about Proleptic Julian calendar in the online encyclopedia.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The proleptic Julian calendar is produced by extending the Julian calendar to dates preceding its official introduction in 45 BC.
This is the convention used in the "astronomical Julian calendar".
Because the Julian Calendar was actually used before that time, one must explicitly state that a given date is in the Proleptic Gregorian Calendar when that is used.
www.onlineencyclopedia.org /p/pr/proleptic_julian_calendar_1.html   (282 words)

  
 Julian calendar   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The Julian calendar was in general use Europe from the times of the Roman Empire until 1582 when Pope Gregory XIII promulgated the Gregorian Calendar which was soon adopted by most countries.
Russia remained on the Julian calendar until the Russian Revolution (which is thus called the 'October but occurred in November according to the calendar).
Easter Pentecost and their associated holy days are calculated according to the Julian calendar in Eastern Orthodox churches and some Eastern Orthodox continue to use the Julian Calendar for their church calendar dates.
www.freeglossary.com /Julian_calendar   (1177 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Proleptic Julian calendar
The proleptic Julian calendar is produced by extending the Julian calendar to dates preceding AD 4 when its quadrennial leap year stabilized.
A calendar obtained by extension earlier in time than its invention or implementation is called the "proleptic" version of the calendar, and thus we obtain the proleptic Julian calendar.
Likewise, the proleptic Gregorian calendar is occasionally used to specify dates before its official introduction in 1582.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Proleptic_Julian_calendar   (273 words)

  
 Julian Calendar - OrthodoxWiki   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The Julian Calendar remained in use into the 20th century in some countries, particularly in eastern Europe, and is still used by the majority of Orthodox faithful for ecclesiastical dates.
The Julian calendar was in general use in western Europe from the times of the Roman Empire until 1582, when Pope Gregory XIII promulgated the Gregorian Calendar, which was soon adopted by most Roman Catholic countries.
A Revised Julian Calendar was proposed during a synod in Constantinople in May of 1923, consisting of a solar part which was and will be identical to the Gregorian calendar until the year 2800, and a lunar part that calculated Pascha astronomically at Jerusalem.
orthodoxwiki.org /Julian_Calendar   (2398 words)

  
 The Julian and Gregorian Calendars
The difference of the length of the Julian calendar year from the length of the real solar year is thus 0.0078 days (11.23 minutes) in the former case and 0.0076 days (10.94 minutes) in the latter case.
In fact a non-Gregorian calendar reform (involving a 33-year cycle and a prime meridian running through Virginia) would have stabilized the vernal equinox at March 21 for the whole world, but this possibility (assuming it was considered by the Pope) was rejected, presumably on political grounds.
The Gregorian Calendar was adopted immediately upon the promulgation of Pope Gregory's decree in the Catholic countries of Italy, Spain, Portugal and Poland, and shortly thereafter in France and Luxembourg.
hermetic.nofadz.com /cal_stud/cal_art.html   (3479 words)

  
 Julian Calendar Information   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The Julian calendar, introduced by Julius Caesar in -45, was a solar calendar with months of fixed lengths.
The Julian proleptic calendar is formed by applying the rules of the Julian calendar to times before Caesar's reform.
Through the Middle Ages the use of the Julian calendar evolved and acquired local peculiarities that continue to snare the unwary historian.
home.earthlink.net /~bishopdave/other/calendarinfo/julian.html   (685 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Julian calendar
In the 16th century the Gregorian Calendar Reform was introduced to improve its accuracy with respect to the time of vernal equinox, but the changes are relatively minor.
Russia, remained on the Julian calendar until after the Russian Revolution (which is thus called the 'October Revolution' but occurred in November according to the Gregorian calendar).
Easter, Christmas and New Year are still calculated according to the Julian calendar in the Eastern Orthodox churches, and some Eastern Orthodox churches continue to use the Julian Calendar for all their church calendar dates.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Julian_calendar   (867 words)

  
 [No title]
The "leap-year calculation" rule: In the Julian calendar, there is a simple rule that says that every year that is divisible by four is a leap year.
However, in our familiar Gregorian calendar, the rule is slightly more complex: Every year that is divisible by four is a leap year, except that every year that is (a) divisible by 100 and (b) indivisible by 400, is not a leap year.
Occasionally you'll see proleptic anniversaries (for example the anniversary of the October Revolution is in November), but non-prolepticism is the norm (for example Columbus's discovery of America was on October 12 1492 Julian and the first official celebration of the event was on October 12 1892 Gregorian).
www.orafaq.com /papers/dates_o.doc   (1874 words)

  
 Julian calendar - the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The Julian calendar was in general use in Europe from the times of the RomanEmpire until 1582, when Pope Gregory XIII promulgated the GregorianCalendar, which was soon adopted by most Catholic countries.
Russia remained on the Julian calendar until after the Russian Revolution (which is thus called the 'October Revolution' butoccurred in November according to the Gregorian calendar).
A Revised Julian calendar was proposed during a synod inConstantinople in May of 1923,consisting of a solar part which was and will be identical to the Gregorian calendar until the year 2800, and a lunar part whichcalculated Easter astronomically at Jerusalem.
www.aaez.biz /default.asp?t=Julian_calendar   (1885 words)

  
 12.1.8 Julian_Day Procedure
Days were added and subtracted from time to time to keep the calendar on track with the season, which led to problems with planning and abuses for political purposes.
The Julian calendar was a distinct improvement, but its year length of 365.25 days differed from the true year by about 11 minutes.
Extending a calendar before the time when it was adopted is referred to as the ``proleptic'' version of that calendar.
www.lanl.gov /Caesar/node197.html   (953 words)

  
 Julian Date   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The result is a calendar date prior to 4 A.D. These dates are part of what is known as the Julian proleptic calendar.
A Julian date is the interval of time in days and fractions of a day since 4713 BC January 1, Greenwich noon, Julian proleptic calendar.
Julian date 0.0 is January 1, Greenwich noon of the year 4713 B.C. of the Julian proleptic calendar.
pweb.jps.net /~gangale3/weidner/julian.html   (475 words)

  
 Calendars - Numericana
The Julian day number associated with the solar day is the number assigned to a day in a continuous count of days beginning with the Julian day number 0 assigned to the day starting at Greenwich mean noon on 1 January 4713 BC, Julian proleptic calendar -4712.
The National Calendar of India was last reformed in 1957: Its leap years coincide with those of the Gregorian calendar, but years begin at the vernal equinox and are counted from the Saka Era (the spring equinox of 79 CE).
A solar calendar should be engineered to make the long-term ratio of the number of days to the number of elapsed calendar years (365.2425 for the Gregorian calendar) as close as possible to the observed number of days in a tropical year, which is slightly less than 365.2422.
home.att.net /~numericana/answer/calendar.htm   (8131 words)

  
 The Calendar
One unpleasant feature about the Julian date, however, is that it counts dates from noon (so if we wish to designate a day by the integral part of the Julian date, it will change at noon), whereas nearly all calendars either change day at sunrise, or sunset, or midnight, but certainly not at noon.
The year 2000 of the Gregorian lunar calendar (golden number 6, epact 24; this year is embolismic) starts on 1999-12-08 of the Gregorian solar calendar, which is the day which starts on Julian date 2451520.5.
The Mayan calendar is actually the conjunction of three or four independent (but related) calendars: the Haab and the Tzolkin, which together form the Short Count, the Long Count, and possibly the Lords of the Night, which we now describe in turn.
www.madore.org /~david/misc/calendar.html   (4615 words)

  
 Julian Day Numbers
The Julian day number system is sometimes (erroneously) said to have been invented by Joseph Justus Scaliger (born 1540-08-05 JC in Agen, France, died 1609-01-21 JC in Leiden, Holland), who during his life immersed himself in Greek, Latin, Persian and Jewish literature, and who was one of the founders of the science of chronology.
At some point students of calendrical science decided that the Julian day number system would be very useful in their field, provided the notion of a "day", i.e., "nychthemeron", were changed to accord with that notion as commonly used in connection with calendars.
To use the term "Julian date" to mean day-of-year when the term also means a date in the Julian Calendar (not to mention its use in the third sense by astronomers and calendricists) is simply to invite confusion.
hermetic.nofadz.com /cal_stud/jdn.htm   (2907 words)

  
 The Julian calendar
The new calendar is a mixture from the calendar of the Ptolemaios IIIrd Euergetes Ist and the calendar of the Roman republic.
The calendar is a pure sun calendar with 12 months to 29, 30 or 31 days.
Since the Roman senate met traditionally at the 1st Ianuarius for the opening of the meeting yearly, the beginning of the year of the Julian calendar was specified on the 1st Ianuraius.
www.kalendersysteme.de /english/calendar/systems/calendar_09.html   (1862 words)

  
 Julian Day Numbers
Julian Day Numbers, or the Julian Date (JD), is the absolute count of days that have elapsed since Noon 1 January 4713 BC on the Julian Calendar, or on what may more strictly be called the Julian "Proleptic" Calendar, meaning the Julian Calendar as applied to an era prior to its actual use.
Second, if we are using the Gregorian Calendar, a correction must be added to reduce the date on the Julian calendar to that on the Gregorian.
This corresponds to 00:00 13 November 1997 on the Gregorian calendar.
www.friesian.com /numbers.htm   (1559 words)

  
 The Julian date
Joseph Justus Scaliger developed a calendar with that it, independently of calendar reforms, possible was daily differences to be computed.
The Julian date is a sequential counting of the days within a Julian period.The first day of this period is Monday, 1st January 4713 b.o.c.
It is the ordinal number in the 19 yearly old Meton moon cycle and in the church calendar for the determination of the Easter date is used.
www.kalendersysteme.de /english/calendar/systems/calendar_01.html   (612 words)

  
 2. The Christian Calendar
The Gregorian calendar replaced the Chinese calendar in 1912, but the Gregorian calendar was not used throughout the country until the communist revolution of 1949.
In the Julian calendar the relationship between the days of the week and the dates of the year is repeated in cycles of 28 years.
In the Julian calendar, the Epact is the age of the moon on 22 March.
www.tondering.dk /claus/cal/node3.html   (7730 words)

  
 Julian Day Calculations (Gregorian Calendar)
The Julian Day Count is a uniform count of days from a remote epoch in the past (-4712 January 1, 12 hours Greenwich Mean Time (Julian proleptic Calendar) = 4713 BCE January 1, 12 hours GMT (Julian proleptic Calendar) = 4714 BCE November 24, 12 hours GMT (Gregorian proleptic Calendar)).
This is the Julian Day Number for the beginning of the date in question at 0 hours, Greenwich time.
To convert a Julian Day Number to a Gregorian date, assume that it is for 0 hours, Greenwich time (so that it ends in 0.5).
quasar.as.utexas.edu /BillInfo/JulianDatesG.html   (672 words)

  
 Geek Trivia: Creative differences
Perhaps the most famous (relatively speaking) example is the proleptic Julian calendar, which Judeo-Christian scholars have used to pin exact dates on Biblical and Talmudic accounts of past events.
Enacted by Julius Caesar (hence the name), the Julian calendar became Roman law in 45 B.C. So any events occurring before 45 B.C. would be part of the proleptic Julian calendar.
Using the proleptic Julian calendar, the current Kali Yuga age began at midnight, Feb. 18, 3102 B.C. Of course, Hinduism preaches a continuous cycle of death and rebirth, so pinning down a Hindu "creation date" for the universe is beyond the context of the faith.
articles.techrepublic.com.com /5100-10881_11-5844570-2.html   (829 words)

  
 Dieter Egger @ FESG TUM Applets: Julian Date - Calendar Date   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
You may enter Calendar Date or Julian Date (Julian Day Number) (both referred to Greenwich).
Leave the cursor in the text field which shall be your input.
The six text fields on the left side represent calendar date whereas the three on the right side represent julian date.
www.km-zschiedrich.de /Astro/Astro-Java/DTCalendar.html   (247 words)

  
 Repository of all RPNE Functions : Date
You can convert and use Julian date after JD=2299159.5, that's what is called proleptic calendar.
This is the Proleptic Julian Calendar Notation, use
{ yyyy mm dd } in Julian (proleptic)
xout.free.fr /rpne/tutor/man/date.html   (375 words)

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