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Topic: Propositional knowledge


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In the News (Thu 21 Mar 19)

  
 Knowledge
Knowledge is a term with many meanings depending on context, but is as a rule closely related to such concepts as meaning, information, instruction, communication, representation, learning and mental stimulus.
Knowledge may also be claimed for the pronouncements of secular or religious authority such as the state or the church.
Knowledge may also be derived by reason from either traditional, authoritative, or experiential sources or a combination of them.
www.starrepublic.org /encyclopedia/wikipedia/k/kn/knowledge_1.html   (1121 words)

  
 Knowledge
The term knowledge is also used to mean the confident understanding of a subject, potentially with the ability to use it for a specific purpose.
Knowledge management seeks to understand the way in which knowledge is used and traded within organisations and treats knowledge as self-referential and recursive.
The spread of this knowledge is examined by diffusion.
articles.gourt.com /en/knowledge   (1047 words)

  
  Science Fair Projects - Propositional knowledge
Propositional knowledge or declarative knowledge is knowledge that some proposition is either true or false.
This distinguishes propositional knowledge from know-how or procedural knowledge, which is the knowledge of how to perform some task.
Knowledge can be classified into a priori knowledge, which is obtained without needing to observe the world, and a posteriori or empirical knowledge, which is only obtained after observing the world or interacting with it in some way.
www.all-science-fair-projects.com /science_fair_projects_encyclopedia/Propositional_knowledge   (1505 words)

  
 What Is Knowledge?
Similarly, a theory of relevancy should include a theory of (propositional) knowledge of what is relevant, that is, of what we know to be relevant; and a theory of property a theory of (propositional) knowledge of what is someone's property, that is, of what we know to be someone's property.
Propositional knowledge is true belief, but true belief need not be knowledge, because a belief may just happen to be true.
The idealist distinction between knowledge and faith is itself not justifiable, for given that knowledge is grounded belief and given that it need not always be based on empirical evidence (although it may never be contrary to it), there is no place for faith in the religious, that is, supernaturalist, sense.
www.control-z.com /pgs/what_is_knowledge.html   (3503 words)

  
 Epistemology - Origin of Knowledge
Not surprisingly, the way that knowledge claims are justified both leads to and depends on the general approach to philosophy one adopts.
Knowledge, therefore, is distinguished from true belief by its justification, and much of epistemology is concerned with how true beliefs might be properly justified.
Knowledge is true and believed and...Sometimes, when people say they 'believe in' something, what they mean is that they predict that it will prove to be useful or successful in some sense - perhaps someone might 'believe in' their favourite football team.
www.0rig.in /knowledge/epistemology.htm   (3544 words)

  
 Epistemology [Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy]
Propositional knowledge, obviously, encompasses knowledge about a wide range of matters: scientific knowledge, geographical knowledge, mathematical knowledge, self-knowledge, and knowledge about any field of study whatever.
Non-empirical or a priori knowledge is possible independently of, or prior to, any experience, and requires only the use of reason; examples include knowledge of logical truths such as the law of non-contradiction, as well as knowledge of abstract claims (such as ethical claims or claims about various conceptual matters).
Empirical or a posteriori knowledge is possible only subsequent, or posterior, to certain sense experiences (in addition to the use of reason); examples include knowledge of the color or shape of a physical object or knowledge of geographical locations.
www.iep.utm.edu /e/epistemo.htm   (6367 words)

  
 Propositional knowledge - Psychology Wiki - a Wikia wiki
Propositional knowledge or declarative knowledge is knowledge that some proposition is either true or false.
This distinguishes propositional knowledge from know-how or procedural knowledge, which is the knowledge of how to perform some task.
Knowledge can be classified into a priori knowledge, which is obtained without needing to observe the world, and a posteriori or empirical knowledge, which is only obtained after observing the world or interacting with it in some way.
psychology.wikia.com /wiki/Propositional_knowledge   (1427 words)

  
 The Analysis of Knowledge (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)
The objective of the analysis of knowledge is to state the conditions that are individually necessary and jointly sufficient for propositional knowledge: knowledge that such-and-such is the case.
Propositional knowledge must be distinguished from two other kinds of knowledge that fall outside the scope of the analysis: knowing a place or a person, and knowing how to do something.
Those who think that belief is necessary for knowledge could reply that the example does not qualify as a case of knowledge without belief because it isn't a case of knowledge to begin with.
plato.stanford.edu /entries/knowledge-analysis   (9174 words)

  
  BOOK OF INSTRUMENTS: KNOWLEDGE AND FAITH            
Similarly, a theory of relevancy should include a theory of (propositional) knowledge of what is relevant, that is, of what we know to be relevant; and a theory of property a theory of (propositional) knowledge of what is someone's property, that is, of what we know to be someone's property.
Propositional knowledge is true belief, but true belief need not be knowledge, because a belief may just happen to be true.
The idealist distinction between knowledge and faith is itself not justifiable, for given that knowledge is grounded belief and given that it need not always be based on empirical evidence (altho it may never be contrary to it), there is no place for faith in the religious, that is, supernaturalist, sense.
www.trinp.org /MNI/BoI/4/3/1.HTM   (1476 words)

  
  Knowledge
Knowledge includes, but is not limited to, those descriptions, hypotheses, concepts, theories, principles and procedures which to a reasonable degree of certainty are either true or useful.
Knowledge may also be based upon the pronouncements of secular or religious authority such as the state or the church.
Knowledge may also be derived by reason from either traditional, authoritative, or scientific sources or a combination of them and may or may not be verified by resort to observation and testing.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/kn/Know.html   (397 words)

  
 Knowledge   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Knowledge is constructed in such a way that an application of well-constructed knowledge will directly or indirectly serve living and acting.
For this kind of theory, knowledge was understood on the model of the observation of a fixed and independent object on the part of a subject.
The spectator account of knowledge was accompanied by a ‘quest for certainty’ in epistemology; that is, a search for a fixed and certain foundation for knowledge claims, for example in a priori truths or in the incorrigible data of our senses.
www.db.dk /jni/lifeboat/Concepts/Knowledge.htm   (1299 words)

  
 Descriptive knowledge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Descriptive knowledge, also declarative knowledge or propositional knowledge, is the species of knowledge that is, by its very nature, expressed in declarative sentences or indicative propositions.
This distinguishes descriptive knowledge from what is commonly known as "know-how", or procedural knowledge (the knowledge of how, and especially how best, to perform some task), and "knowing of," or knowledge by acquaintance (the knowledge of something's existence).
By acquiring knowledge that is embedded in one's language, culture, or traditions.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Propositional_knowledge   (1242 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The question of knowledge (that is, "Do I know or don't I?"), which an inquirer might well pose at some point in her questioning, is already moot when she possesses justified belief in a true proposition.
Saddling his knowledge, as he does, within the confines of truth, he cannot consider whether the issue of knowledge might be independent of the issue of justification.
Propositional knowledge is no use, as Kaplan points out, in determining which of our beliefs are known and which are not known.
www.personal.kent.edu /~ebowen/Gettier.html   (4506 words)

  
 TCS Daily - Athena's Gifts
Specifically, he focuses on useful knowledge, defined as "knowledge of natural phenomena that exclude the human mind and social institutions", and the connection between its existence and its use and economic performance.
He digs deeper, arguing that the communication, dissemination, and aggregation of useful knowledge are primarily responsible for the unprecedented economic performance of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Knowledge transmission and access become important for creating or limiting the acquisition and the implementation of propositional knowledge.
www.tcsdaily.com /article.aspx?id=012403C   (1497 words)

  
 Hauptli's Introduction to Epistemology Lecture Supplement
A priori propositions are those which can be known to be true and whose truth is ascertainable by a procedure that makes no reference to experience; non-empirical propositions of the kind in question are not like this, for their truth is, strictly speaking, not ascertainable at all.
Obvious examples are propositions about ourselves and their logical consequences: such propositions as those expressed by tokens of the sentences "I exist," "I have some beliefs," "There are thoughts," and so forth.
The distinction between analytic and synthetic propositions is best made in terms of an alleged connection between meaning and truth: analytic propositions are supposed to be such that when one understands their meaning, one sees that they must be true.
www.fiu.edu /~hauptli/IntroductiontoEpistemology.html   (4439 words)

  
 Propositional Logic for AI
This knowledge may be stored under various representations, and, e.g., a set of assignments encoding possible situations (or examples) can constitute a knowledge base, but a formula with exactly these assignments as model is an alternative representation (since it describes the same reality, i.e., set of possible situations).
The knowledge base formalizes the background knowledge of the system (what it has learnt, for instance by knowledge acquisition processes, or what it has been taught, etc.); for a given intelligent system, it is rather the same from one reasoning problem to the other.
Note that such an absurd knowledge base might be the result of the addition of pieces of knowledge (as a conjunction of new rules, for instance) to a preexisting one.
users.info.unicaen.fr /~zanutti/rechch   (7299 words)

  
 Comparing Space Efficiency of Propositional Knowledge Representation Formalisms
We investigate the space efficiency of a Propositional Knowledge Representation (PKR) formalism.
Informally, the space efficiency of a formalism F in representing a certain piece of knowledge ff, is the size of the shortest formula of F that represents ff.
In this paper we assume that knowledge is either a set of propositional interpretations or a set of formulae (theorems).
www.dis.uniroma1.it /~ai/citations/cado-etal-96-b.html   (231 words)

  
 Epistemology : Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy Online
There is a vast array of views about propositional knowledge, but one virtually universal presupposition is that knowledge is true belief, but not mere true belief (see Belief and knowledge).
Since not all knowledge seems to be based on sense experience or introspection or rational intuition, some epistemologists claim that some knowledge is innate (see Innate knowledge; Knowledge, tacit; Kant, I. Plato).
Adult humans may employ reasoning to arrive at some of their knowledge, but the naturalists are quick to point out that children and adult humans arrive at knowledge in ways that do not appear to involve any reasoning whatsoever.
www.rep.routledge.com /article/P059   (1992 words)

  
 Procedural knowledge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Know-how is different from other kinds of knowledge such as propositional knowledge in that it can be directly applied to a task.
One limitation of procedural knowledge is its job-dependence; thus it tends to be less general than propositional knowledge.
One advantage of procedural knowledge is that it can involve more senses, such as hands-on experience, practice at solving problems, understanding of the limitations of a specific solution, etc. Thus know-how can frequently eclipse theory.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Procedural_knowledge   (362 words)

  
 Art and Epistemology [Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy]
Art does not have propositional content that can be learned in a traditional way, even though it can been seen to have effects that promote knowledge and that can either encourage or undermine the development of understanding.
The rationalists rejected the idea that the imagination could be considered a source of knowledge, with Descartes going so far as to dismiss what he called "the blundering constructions of the imagination." Returning to the ideals of Plato, the rationalists strictly employed a knowledge requirement involving justified true belief.
Without the propositional content used to legitimize the standard analysis of knowledge, it seems that the knowledge claims we have about the content of an artwork will never have the same kind of validity.
www.utm.edu /research/iep/a/art-ep.htm   (3366 words)

  
 relepisthandout4
In propositional knowledge, the object of "knows" is a proposition, the meaning expressed by a declarative sentence.
A widely accepted view of knowledge, originating perhaps opaquely in Plato, is the tripartite view of knowledge (i.e., knowledge requires three conditions).
Owing to the widely shared intuition that knowledge is not compatible with epistemic luck, either justification must rule out accidentally true belief or the tripartite view of knowledge is incorrect (i.e., there must be a forth condition of knowledge).
philofreligion.homestead.com /files/relepisthandout4.html   (2227 words)

  
 Art and Epistemology [Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy]
Art does not have propositional content that can be learned in a traditional way, even though it can been seen to have effects that promote knowledge and that can either encourage or undermine the development of understanding.
The rationalists rejected the idea that the imagination could be considered a source of knowledge, with Descartes going so far as to dismiss what he called "the blundering constructions of the imagination." Returning to the ideals of Plato, the rationalists strictly employed a knowledge requirement involving justified true belief.
Without the propositional content used to legitimize the standard analysis of knowledge, it seems that the knowledge claims we have about the content of an artwork will never have the same kind of validity.
www.iep.utm.edu /a/art-ep.htm   (3366 words)

  
 Discrimination and Propositional Knowledge
This paper is an attempt to extend this notion to knowledge in general, and to explore further the concept of epistemic relevance.
In evaluating ascriptions of knowledge, we need only look at cognitive equivalence relative to the putative knower, at the instant of putative knowledge, relative to the belief which may be knowledge; we need not concern ourselves with ideal standards or with the psychological state of the individual doing the ascribing.
Knowledge is not denied simply when there is some fact which, if the believer knew it, some world where (a) is false would seem relevant to him; it is rather denied whenever some such world actually is relevant.
www.research.ibm.com /people/c/chess/thesis.html   (12265 words)

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