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Topic: Protein


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  The Protein Society: www.proteinsociety.org
The Protein Society welcomes individuals devoted to furthering research and development in protein science to apply for a regular or corporate membership.
Members have an opportunity to actively participate in the emerging fields of protein science including proteomics, bioinformatics, structural biology, and computational biology as they pertain to proteins at the molecular and cellular level.
Protein Science is dedicated to research on all scientific aspects of protein molecules.
www.proteinsociety.org   (445 words)

  
  Protein Information Sheet
Proteins are broken down into their constituent amino acids during digestion which are then absorbed and used to make new proteins in the body.
Dietary proteins with all the essential amino acids in the proportions required by the body are said to be a high quality protein.
Protein quality is usually defined according to the amino acid pattern of egg protein, which is regarded as the ideal.
www.vegsoc.org /info/protein.html   (1177 words)

  
 MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: Protein in diet
Protein is also found in all body fluids, except bile and urine.
Protein is also important for growth and development during childhood, adolescence, and pregnancy.
Examples of combined, complete plant proteins are rice and beans, milk and wheat cereal, and corn and beans.
www.nlm.nih.gov /medlineplus/ency/article/002467.htm   (521 words)

  
  Protein - Health Encyclopedia
Protein is the main component of muscles, organs, and glands.
Proteins are described as essential and nonessential proteins or amino acids.
Protein in foods (such as grains, fruits, and vegetables) are either low, incomplete protein or lack one of the essential amino acids.
www.nbc5i.com /encyclopedia/6863281/detail.html   (770 words)

  
  Protein - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Proteins are also important in cell signaling, the immune response, cell adhesion, the cell cycle, and essentially every process within a living cell.
All proteins are polymers whose amino acid sequence is specified by a gene encoded in the genetic code.
The end of the protein with a free carboxyl group is known as the C-terminus or carboxy terminus, while the end with a free amino group is known as the N-terminus or amino terminus.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Protein   (5138 words)

  
 Protein: Nutrition Source, Harvard School of Public Health
Proteins in food and the environment are responsible for these overreactions of the immune system to what should be harmless proteins.
Back in 1999, the Food and Drug Administration let companies claim that foods containing soy protein "may reduce the risk of heart disease."(11) The claim was based on early research showing that soy protein lowered levels of LDL (bad) cholesterol.
The AHA committee says that even though soy protein itself has little direct effect on cholesterol, soy foods are good for the heart and blood vessels because they usually replace less healthful choices, like red meat, and because they deliver plenty of polyunsaturated fat, fiber, vitamins, and minerals, and are low in saturated fat.
www.hsph.harvard.edu /nutritionsource/protein.html   (2756 words)

  
 NBC10.com - Health Encyclopedia - Protein
The basic structure of protein is a chain of amino acids.
Proteins are described as essential and nonessential proteins or amino acids.
Protein in foods (such as grains, fruits, and vegetables) are either low, incomplete protein or lack one of the essential amino acids.
www.nbc10.com /encyclopedia/6863281/detail.html   (768 words)

  
 PROTEIN   (Site not responding. Last check: )
In general, high biological proteins (complete proteins that contain all of the essential amino acids) come from animal sources, such as meat, fish, poultry, and eggs, (these proteins may also be referred to as complete proteins).
A variety of proteins from plants and animal sources should be consumed, to assure that the diet has an adequate amount of protein, with a balance of amino acids.
Protein intake in excess of these requirements is usually not necessary and does not seem to have any benefits for either strength or endurance training.
ag.arizona.edu /NSC/new/sn/hpprotein.htm   (1690 words)

  
 Protein
Protein once absorbed into the blood is filtered by the kidneys and if not used to build and repair muscle tissue, is converted to energy or stored as fat.
Protein requirements of athletes are 1.2-1.5 gram of protein per kilogram of body weight.
The amount of protein should continue to be restricted at 20% or thereabouts, depending on activity level.
www.drlam.com /opinion/protein.cfm   (857 words)

  
 Protein & Amino Acids- Ask the Dietitian
The RDA for protein is 63 gm for males and 50 gm for females.
If this much protein were from lean meat sources, it would equate to an additional 1300 fat calories for a total of 2100 calories from protein sources alone.
Protein once absorbed into the blood is filtered by the kidneys and if not used to build and repair muscle tissue, is converted to energy or stored as fat.
www.dietitian.com /protein.html   (3860 words)

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