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Topic: Proton (disambiguation)


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  Proton - the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
The nuclei of otheratoms are composed of protons and neutrons held together by the strong nuclear force.
The number of protons in the nucleusdetermines the chemical properties of the atom and which chemicalelement it is.
Protons are classified as baryons and are composed of two up quarks and one down quark, which are also held together by the strong nuclear force, mediated by gluons.
www.world-knowledge-encyclopedia.com /?t=Proton   (321 words)

  
 Proton - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The number of protons in the nucleus determines the chemical properties of the atom and which chemical element it is.
The proton's antimatter equivalent is the antiproton, which has the same magnitude charge as the proton but the opposite sign.
In this context, a proton donor is an acid and a proton acceptor a base (see acid-base reaction theories).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Proton   (543 words)

  
 Proton - Wikipedia
The proton is a subatomic particle of one unit positive electric charge.
The number of protons in the nucleus determines the chemical properties of the atom and what chemical element it is.
Protons are classified as baryons and are composed of two up quarks and one down quark, which are also held together by the strong nuclear force.
nostalgia.wikipedia.org /wiki/Proton   (139 words)

  
 Proton (disambiguation) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Proton (formal designation: UR-500) is a Soviet unmanned space vehicle design first launched in 1965 and is still in use.
Proton in geology is a province of a craton (an ancient section of continental crust) that is between 1.6 and 2.5 billion years old.
Proton is the name for a renal/clinical database developed by CCL (Clinical Computing Limited).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Proton_(disambiguation)   (270 words)

  
 Proton - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
He noticed that when alpha particles were shot into nitrogen gas, his scintillation detectors showed the signatures of hydrogen nuclei.
He thus suggested that the hydrogen nucleus, which was known to have an atomic number of 1, was an elementary particle.
The antiproton is the antiparticle of the proton.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Proton   (609 words)

  
 Quark - the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
In addition, leptons (such as the electron, the muon, and the neutrino) have integral electric charge (−1 or 0 in units of the proton charge) while quarks have fractionalelectric charge (+⅔ or −⅓;; antiquarks have charge−⅔ or +⅓; and antileptons have charge +1 or 0).
Ordinary matter such as protons and neutrons are composed of quarks of the up and down variety only.
Particles composed of one red, one green and one blue quark are called baryons; the proton and the neutron are the most important examples.
www.free-web-encyclopedia.com /?t=Quarks   (1676 words)

  
 ► Proton: Encyclopedia topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
The number of protons in the nucleus determines the chemical properties of the atom and which chemical element (chemical element: Any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter) it is.
The proton's antimatter (antimatter: Matter consisting of elementary particles that are the antiparticles of those making up normal matter) equivalent is the antiproton (antiproton: An unstable negatively charged proton; the antiparticle of a proton), which has the same magnitude charge as the proton but the opposite sign.
The proton was discovered in 1918 by Ernest Rutherford (Ernest Rutherford: British physicist (born in New Zealand) who discovered the atomic nucleus and proposed a nuclear model of the atom (1871-1937)).
www.absoluteastronomy.com /reference/proton   (789 words)

  
 All words on Proton
In physics, the proton (Greek proton = first) is a subatomic particle with a positive fundamental electric charge of 1.6 × 10
The number of protons in the nucleus determines the chemical properties of the atom and which chemical element it is. Protons are classified as baryons and are composed of two Up quarks and one Down quark, which are also held together by the strong nuclear force, mediated by gluons.
In chemistry and biochemistry, the term proton may refer to the hydrogen ion.
www.allwords.org /pr/proton.html   (727 words)

  
 Proton
In chemistry and biochemistry, the term proton may refer to the hydrogen ion in aqueous solution (in other words, the hydronium ion).
When investigating Nitrogen gas, he noticed that when alpha particles were shot into the gas, there were the signs of hydrogen noticed in the scintillation detectors.
He therefore suggested that the hydrogen nucleus, which was known to have an atomic number of 1, was an elementary particle.
encyclopedia.codeboy.net /wikipedia/p/pr/proton.html   (402 words)

  
 Proton   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Proton puzzle puts physicists in a whirl The more deeply particle physicists probe the proton's structure, the more complicated it seems to get.
This achievement was one of the key milestones in Proton's contract administered by the Naval Research Laboratory...
This is a follow-on to the Phase I contract under which Proton and the UNLVRF team are developing a hydrogen filling station...
hallencyclopedia.com /Proton   (618 words)

  
 Anions   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Together, protons and neutrons form the nucleus of an atom, which is surrounded by the electrons.
Atoms of the same element have the same number of protons, although the same element can differ in the number of neutrons which are then called isotopes of that element.
However, protons and neutrons themselves are now known to consist of varieties of a still smaller particle called the quark, and the electron is considered a type of lepton.
anions.en.reference.pl   (646 words)

  
 Protons   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
The proton is observed to be stable, with a lower limit on its
Protons are classified as baryons and are composed of two up
gravitational force, the charge on the proton must be equal to the charge on the electron, otherwise the net repulsion of having an excess of positive or negative charge would cause a noticeable expansion effect on the universe, and indeed any gravitationally aggregated matter (planets, stars, etc.).
www.writen4u.com /public/Protons.asp   (518 words)

  
 For alternative meanings see proton disambiguation ...
:"For alternative meanings see proton (disambiguation)." In physics, the "proton" is a subatomic particle with a positive fundamental electric charge of 1.6 × 10-19 coulomb and a mass of 938 MeV (1.6726231 × 10-27 kg, or about 1800 times that of an electron).
The proton is observed to be stable, with a lower limit on its half-life of about 1035 years, although some theories predict that the proton may decay.
The number of protons in the nucleus determines the chemical properties of the atom and what chemical element it is. Protons are classified as baryons and are composed of two up quarks and one down quark, which are also held together by the strong nuclear force, mediated by gluons.
www.geodatabase.de /proton   (384 words)

  
 For alternative meanings see proton disambiguation proton disambiguation ...
The proton is observed to be stable, with a lower limit on its half-life half-life of about 1035 years, although some theories predict that the proton may decay proton may decay.
The nuclei of other atoms are composed of neutron neutrons and protons held together by the strong nuclear force strong nuclear force.
In this context, a proton donor is an acid acid and a proton acceptor a base base (see acid-base reaction theories acid-base reaction theories).
www.biodatabase.de /proton   (346 words)

  
 Atom
At the center of the atom is a tiny, positively charged nucleus composed of protons and neutrons (known as nucleons).
Atoms are generally classified by their atomic number, which corresponds to the number of protons in the atom.
The mass number, atomic mass number, or nucleon number of an element is the total number of protons and neutrons in an atom of that element, because each proton or neutron essentially has a mass of 1 amu.
www.free-download-soft.com /info/atom.html   (1720 words)

  
 Proton - Encyclopedia.WorldSearch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
The proton in chemistry (The George Fisher Baker non-resident lectureship in chemistry at Cornell University)
The Structure of the Proton : Deep Inelastic Scattering (Cambridge Monographs on Mathematical Physics)
Mechanisms of Homogeneous Catalysis from Protons to Proteins
encyclopedia.worldsearch.com /proton.htm   (435 words)

  
 Electron Definition / Electron Research   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
It is composed of one or further protons and zero or further neutrons.
The number of protons in an atomic nucleus is named the atomic number, and determines which element the atom is (for example hydrogen, carbon, oxygen, etc.).
The numbers of protons and neutrons in a nucleus are correlated; in light nuclei they are approximately equal, while heavier nuclei have a larger number of neutrons.
www.elresearch.com /Electron   (402 words)

  
 ► Quark: Encyclopedia topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
In particle physics (particle physics: The branch of physics that studies subatomic particles and their interactions), the quarks are subatomic particle (subatomic particle: A particle that is less complex than an atom; regarded as constituents of all matter) s thought to be elemental and indivisible.
Particles composed of a quark and an anti-quark of the corresponding anti-color are called meson (meson: An elementary particle responsible for the forces in the atomic nucleus; a hadron with a baryon number of 0) s.
And because quarks were fermions, the Pauli exclusion principle (Pauli exclusion principle: No two electrons or protons or neutrons in a given system can be in states characterized by the same set of quantum numbers) had to apply, and that meant two or more identical fermions could not share the same quantum states.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /reference/quark   (2095 words)

  
 Quark
Quarks are generally believed to never exist alone but only in color-neutral groups of two or three (and possibly five or more); all searches for free quarks since 1977 have yielded negative results.
In addition, leptons (such as the electron, the muon, and the neutrino) have integral electric charge (−1 or 0 in units of the proton charge) while quarks have fractional electric charge (+⅔ or −⅓;; antiquarks have charge −⅔ or +⅓; and antileptons have charge +1 or 0).
In addition to holding quarks together in mesons and baryons, a residual effect of the color force, the strong nuclear force, holds the protons and neutrons together in the atomic nucleus.
www.askfactmaster.com /Quark   (1153 words)

  
 Atom
Every neutral atom has a number of electrons equal to its number of protons; if there is an imbalance, the atom has an electric charge and is called an ion.
Atoms with different numbers of neutrons (but the same number of protons) are called isotopes of a chemical element.
Compare this to the size of the proton which is the only particle in the nucleus of the hydrogen atom which is approximately 0.87×10
encyclopedie-en.snyke.com /articles/atom.html   (1748 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Proton (disambiguation)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Proton (formal designation: UR-500) is a Soviet unmanned space vehicle design first launched in 1965 and still in use as of 2003.
Proton (short for Perusahaan Otomobil Nasional, meaning National Car Project) is a Malaysian car manufacturer initiated in 1983 by Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad.
The main plant is located in Shah Alam.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Proton_(disambiguation)   (215 words)

  
 For alternative meanings see atom disambiguation atom disambiguation ...
At the center center is a tiny positive nucleus nucleus composed of nucleon nucleons (proton protons and neutron neutrons), and the rest of the atom contains only the fairly flexible electron electron shells.
Usually atoms are electrically neutral electrically neutral with as many electron electrons as proton protons.
The simplest atom is the hydrogen atom hydrogen atom, having atomic number 1 and consisting of one proton and one electron.
www.biodatabase.de /atom   (690 words)

  
 Acid   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
The terms "hydrogen ion" and "proton" are used interchangeble- both refer to H
Later on, Bronsted and Lowry defined an acid to be a proton donor and a base to be a proton acceptor.
That is, the HOMO from the base and the LUMO from the acid combine to a bonding molecular orbital.
hallencyclopedia.com /Acid   (1073 words)

  
 Proton   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
The nuclei of other atoms are composed of protons and neutron s held together by the strong nuclear force.
The number of protons in the nucleus determines the chemical properties of the atom and which chemical element it is. Protons are classified as baryons and are composed of two Up quark s and one Down quark, which are also held together by the strong nuclear force, mediated by gluon s.
He therefore suggested that the hydrogen nuclei, which was known to have an atomic number of 1, was an elementary particle.
www.purpleuniverse.com /true_associate-Proton.html   (392 words)

  
 Proton - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
1 Down, 2 Up In physics, the proton (Greek proton = first) is a subatomic particle with an electric charge of one positive fundamental unit (1.602 × 10
This encyclopedia, history, geography and biography article about Proton contains research on
Proton, History, Technological applications, Antiproton, See also, External links and Nucleon.
www.arikah.net /encyclopedia/Proton   (549 words)

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