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Topic: Provinces of Spain


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  León, Lugo, Lleida, Madrid, Málaga, Melilla, Tuspain.com, Travel, Cities, Hotels
EON lies in the north west of Spain with crossroads between Asturias, Galicia and Castile and fertile lands are crossed by the Esla, Sil and Sella Rivers.
Part of the province's wealth is constituted by the Romanesque, Mudejar, Gothic and Plateresque architecture of the churches which line the pilgrim route to Santiago de Compostels.
Capital of the province, the ancient Roman Llierda, is situated along the banks of the Segre River in the middle of a wide plain.
www.tuspain.com /travel/reglm.htm   (1841 words)

  
 Regions of Spain, Alava, Albacete, Alicante, Almería, Asturias, Ävila, Tuspain.com, Travel, Cities, Hotels
It is also one of three Basque provinces consisting of a plain surrounded by mountains and watered by the Zadorra, a tributary of the Ebro, and extends over 3,007 sq.
There are various tourist routes in the province which link Almeria to the province of Granada and the route of the Alpujarras with its beautiful countryside and towns: Benhadux, Gádor, Aljama de Almeria, Canjáyar, Laujar, Alcolea, Berja, Arra, El Ejido, Dallias, Roquetas de Mar and Almeria.
The inland valleys of the province are a genuine paradise for hunting, fishing (salmon and trout) and relaxation.
tuspain.com /travel/rega.htm   (1622 words)

  
 Maps of Spain - Provinces of Spain
Index Page -> Spain´s Autonomous Communities --> Provinces of Spain and spanish costas
Spanish political map outline showing the provinces of Spain and the spanish costas
Data Spain can provide you with large, high-quality versions of this or other spanish maps which can be used freely on your own website or in print, providing you accept our terms and conditions.
www.maps.data-spain.com /spain/political_provinces.html   (80 words)

  
 Provinces of Spain - Definition, explanation
In addition to its seventeen autonomous communities, Spain is divided into fifty provinces.
Formerly of greater importance, since the arrival of the autonomous community system the provinces have had fewer powers.
Most of the provinces are named after their principal town.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/p/pr/provinces_of_spain.php   (530 words)

  
  Maritime Provinces (Spain)
On August 5th, 1858, Motril ceases as a province, taking her ships the flag of Málaga, at the same time that Vivero is moved to Ribadeo, with the same flag and covering the same province.
On July 7th, 1905, a flag is given to the new province of Pontevedra, that lasted until May 24th, 1933, when Pontevedra was assigned the red/white flag of Vigo.
On May 24th, 1933, flags are given to two new provinces in Spain: Gerona and Castellón.
www.crwflags.com /fotw/flags/es~prov.html   (1000 words)

  
  Encyclopedia: Provinces of Spain
It is the capital of Andalusia and of the province of Sevilla.
Huelva is a city in southwestern Spain, the capital of the province of Huelva in the autonomous region of Andalusia.
Ourense (Galician: Ourense; Spanish: Orense) is a town in northwestern Spain, the capital of the province of Ourense in Galicia.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Provinces-of-Spain   (6326 words)

  
 Spain - Search View - MSN Encarta
Spain is increasingly urban with 77 per cent of the population living in towns and cities.
Spain’s tourist industry is centred on the bathing resorts of the Mediterranean coast, especially Andalusia and the Balearic Islands, but also embraces Madrid, Barcelona, Seville, and other famous cities, as well as rural Spain.
Spain and the United States renewed their bilateral defence agreement in 1988, allowing the continued use of bases in Spain by the United States for an additional eight years.
uk.encarta.msn.com /text_761575057__1/Spain.html   (14149 words)

  
 Provinces of Spain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In addition to its seventeen autonomous communities, Spain is divided into fifty provinces.
Formerly of greater importance, since the arrival of the autonomous community system the provinces have had fewer powers.
Most of the provinces are named after their principal town with the exception of Pontevedra, Gipuzkoa, Bizkaia, Araba, Cantabria and Asturias.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Provinces_of_Spain   (232 words)

  
 Spain - MSN Encarta
The Balearic Islands in the Mediterranean and the Canary Islands in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Africa are governed as provinces of Spain.
Spain occupies about 85 per cent of the Iberian Peninsula and is bounded by water for about 88 per cent of its periphery; its Mediterranean coast is about 1,660 km (1,030 mi) long, and its Atlantic coast is about 710 km (440 mi) long.
The highest point in Spain and its insular territories is Pico de Teide 3,718 m (12,198 ft) on Tenerife in the Canary Islands.
uk.encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761575057/Spain.html   (653 words)

  
 Spain - MSN Encarta
Spain occupies about 85 percent of the Iberian Peninsula and is bounded by water for about 88 percent of its periphery; its Mediterranean coast is 1,660 km (1,030 mi) long, and its Atlantic coast is 710 km (440 mi) long.
The highest point in Spain and its insular territories is Pico de Teide (3,715 m/12,188 ft) on Tenerife Island in the Canary Islands.
The climate of Spain is marked by extremes of temperature and, except in the north, generally low rainfall, and the variegated physical features of the country ensure pronounced climatic differences.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761575057/Spain.html   (753 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Spain   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The geographical boundaries of Spain are: on the north, the Pyrenees, the Republic of Andorra, and the Bay of Biscay (known in Spain as Mar Cantabrico, or "Cantabrian Sea"); on the east, the Mediterranean; on the south, the Mediterranean, the Straits of Gibraltar and the Atlantic; on the west, Portugal and the Atlantic.
The Principality of Asturias is the Province of Oviedo.
The chief concordats with Spain are: that of 1737 (Clement XII and Philip V); 1752 (Benedict XIV and Ferdinand VI); 1851 (Pius IX and Isabel II).
www.newadvent.org /cathen/14169b.htm   (17294 words)

  
 A Coruña (province) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A Coruña (historically in English Corunna) is a province of extreme northwestern Spain, in the northwestern part of the autonomous community of Galicia.
It is bordered by the province of Lugo to the east and Pontevedra to the south, and by the Atlantic Ocean to the west and the Bay of Biscay to the north.
The province is home to the Aeropuerto de Lavacolla in Santiago and the Aeropuerto de Alvedro in the city of A Coruña.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/A_Coru%c3%b1a_(province)   (325 words)

  
 Spain and Its Coins
The marriage in 1469 of Ferdinand II of Aragon with Isabella, heiress to the crown of Castile, laid the foundations of a united Spanish kingdom.
Spain suffered also reverse on the battlefields with grave consequences: the loss of Portugal, of the Netherlands and the northern provinces of Spain; and the rebellion in Catalonia and Naples.
Ferdinand VII (1808-1833) was taken prisoner to France and forced to cede the throne of Spain to Joseph Bonaparte (1808-1813), Napoleon's brother.
americanhistory.si.edu /collections/numismatics/spain/spain.htm   (2900 words)

  
 History Of Spain
The population of Spain at the 1991 census was 38,872,268.
Spain is increasingly urban, with more than 80 percent of the population in towns and cities.
In addition, Catalan is spoken in the northeast, Galician (Gallego, akin to Portuguese) is spoken in the northwest, and Basque (Euskara, a pre-Indo-European language) is spoken in the north.
www.hehs.d211.org /people/rodriguezo/spain/s.html   (491 words)

  
 Spain - AGRICULTURE
Of Spain's 50.5 million hectares of land, 20.6 million, or about 40 percent, are suitable for cultivation; however, the soil is generally of poor quality, and only about 10 percent of the land can be considered excellent.
Spain's economic transformation in the 1960s and in the first half of the 1970s caused tremendous outmigration from rural areas.
Accordingly, per capita farm income was low, compared with that of the northern provinces lying to the east, where there were fewer people and higher per capita income levels because of a more diversified economy that included industry, mining, and tourism.
countrystudies.us /spain/57.htm   (2286 words)

  
 History of Spain and its Spanish Heritage
The Jews of Spain were also expelled or forced to renounce their faith, because the Catholic sovereigns believed that the church and the state were indivisible.
Spain was not admitted to the United Nations as a charter member, but in 1952 it was allowed to join some of the special agencies.
Spain is a place that you would be proud to display your Spanish genealogy, family coat of arms or surname history.
www.thetreemaker.com /last-name-meaning/history-of-spain.html   (1983 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Spain Article   (Site not responding. Last check: )
By 1512, most of the kingdoms of present-day Spain were politically unified although not as a modern centralized state.
With the approval of the Spanish Constitution of 1978 and the arrival of democracy, the old historic nationalities — Basque Country, Catalonia and Galicia — were given far-reaching autonomy, which was then soon extended to all Spanish regions, resulting in one of the most decentralized territorial organizations in Western Europe.
There are also five places of sovereignty (plazas de soberanía) on and off the African coast: the cities of Ceuta and Melilla are administered as autonomous cities, an intermediate status between cities and communities; the islands of the Islas Chafarinas, Peñón de Alhucemas, and Peñón de Vélez de la Gomera are under direct Spanish administration.
www.ipedia.com /spain.html   (2932 words)

  
 Spain - The Galicians
Galicians live in the four Spanish provinces located along the far northwest coast of the Iberian Peninsula, but their language zone shades into northern Portugal as well.
Unlike the Basque and the Catalan regions, which were rich, urbanized, and industrialized, Galicia remained relatively poor, agricultural and dominated by rural and village society, as industry had yet to make its appearance there on a large scale.
Moreover, its agricultural sector continued to be among the most backward in Spain, and farm productivity was severely hampered by the tiny size of the individual plots, known as minifundios.
countrystudies.us /spain/38.htm   (680 words)

  
 Teacher Resources - Collection - Parallel Histories: Spain, United States and the American Frontier
Parallel Histories: Spain, United States and the American Frontier is a collaborative project between the Library of Congress, the National Library of Spain and the Biblioteca Colombina y Capitular of Seville.
Spain’s support of the Anglo-American colonies during the American Revolution did not produce lasting cordial relations.
Spain, preoccupied with revolutions in Latin America and U.S. military excursions into west Florida, agreed to the Adams-Onís Treaty of 1819, but withheld ratification until 1821.
memory.loc.gov /learn/collections/spain/history5.html   (902 words)

  
 Spain
Spain occupies about 85 percent of the Iberian Peninsula and is bounded by water for about 88 percent of its periphery; its Mediterranean coast is about 1660 km (about 1030 mi) long, and its Atlantic coast is about 710 km (about 440 mi) long.
The most important topographical feature of Spain is the great, almost treeless, central plateau, called the Meseta, sloping generally downward from north to south and from east to west, and with an average elevation of about 610 m (about 2000 ft) above sea level.
The highest point in Spain and its insular territories is Pico de Teide (3718 m/12,198 ft) on Tenerife Island in the Canary Islands.
www.ovayonda.biz /lodging/country/es.html   (670 words)

  
 The General strike in Spain: June 20, 2002
After six years of the right-wing PP government of Aznar, the workers of Spain have said "Enough is enough!" Today, June 20, 2002, Spain was paralysed by a one-day general strike.
However, the manoeuvre was frustrated by the mobilisation of a mass picket of 300 vans driven by news distribution workers.
Spain- 300,000 Andalusian workers march in Seville by Raquel Estevez.
www.marxist.com /Europe/spain_june20aw.html   (2703 words)

  
 Spain   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The population of Spain is 39,208,236, giving the country an overall density of 77 persons per sq km (201 per sq mi).
Spain is increasingly urban, with 77 percent of the population in towns and cities.
The church during this time became associated with tyranny and bigotry, and this is one of the underlying causes of the widespread disillusionment with religion.
www.telleurope.org /Spain.htm   (390 words)

  
 Provinces of New Spain
1531 Province of Nueva Galicia, part of New Spain.
1562 Province of Nueva Vizcaya, part of New Spain.
1527 - 1543 Province of Yucatán, subordinated to
www.worldstatesmen.org /Mexico_spanish_provinces.html   (1851 words)

  
 Travel guide for Basque Country - Hostels, things to do, nightlife, tips, etc
The Basque Country (Basque: Euskadi) is a region at the north of Spain, bordering the Atlantic Ocean and France.
It is defined formally as an autonomous community of three provinces within Spain, and culturally including a fourth province and a small portion of France.
The Spanish constitution of 1978 established the provinces of Alaba, Guipuzcoa, and Vizcaya as the Basque Autonomous Region.
paganel.eu /basque_country/index.html   (399 words)

  
 Provinces Spain Europe Regional
The measure is already in operation in certain provinces, Avila, Palencia, Segovia, Soria...
Then the poppy was grown in six out of the 32 provinces.
This should follow the example of Ireland, Finland or Spain, and avoid the...
www.iaswww.com /ODP/Regional/Europe/Spain/Provinces   (291 words)

  
 Spain Provinces
Spain's primary administrative divisions are seventeen autonomous communities, and the municipalities of Ceuta and Melilla which are places of Spanish sovereignty in Africa.
In six of those cases, the ISO code for the province is the same as the code for the conterminous autonomous community.
The smallest administrative divisions of Spain are the municipios (municipalities).
www.statoids.com /ues.html   (2274 words)

  
 Alicante, Spain
Alicante is one of the most surprising provinces in Spain.
It is also a booming province, partly due to the surge in tourist activity over recent years, especially along the coastal areas which have the best climatic conditions in the whole of Spain.
Alicante Province: It is such a diverse place offering such a wide range of possibilities that we recommend more than just a weekend visit.
www.euroresidentes.com /euroresiuk/guides-spain/guide-to-alicante.htm   (910 words)

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