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Topic: Psychoactive drug


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  Psychoactive drug Summary
Psychoactive drugs are among the most widely used group of pharmacologically active agents, with extremely important clinical applications, including anesthesia for surgery and analgesia for relief of pain.
Psychoactive drugs are used to suppress disorders of movement and to treat anxiety disorders, depression, bipolar disorder (manic-depression), and schizophrenia, among other mental illnesses.
Psychoactive drugs are used to treat movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, and mental illnesses such as anxiety disorders, depression, bipolar disorder (also known as manic-depression), and schizophrenia.
www.bookrags.com /Psychoactive_drug   (4030 words)

  
  ScienceDaily: Psychoactive drug
A psychoactive drug or psychotropic substance is a chemical substance that acts primarily upon the central nervous system where it alters brain function, resulting in temporary changes in perception, mood, consciousness and behavior.
Psychoactive drug -- A psychoactive drug or psychotropic substance is a chemical substance that acts primarily upon the central nervous system where it alters brain function, resulting in temporary changes in perception,...
Drug addiction -- Drug addiction, or substance dependence is the compulsive use of psychoactive drugs, to the point where the user has no effective choice but to continue use.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/Psychoactive_drug   (1493 words)

  
  Drug - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A drug is a molecule that binds with a receptor in a cell membrane or an enzyme which produces some biological effects by altering the cellular functions as a result of that binding.
Thus, drug is merely an artificial definition that distinguishes whether that molecule is synthesized within an organism or outside an organism.
Recreational drug use is the use of psychoactive drugs for recreational purposes rather than for work, medical or spiritual purposes, although the distinction is not always clear.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Drug   (490 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Psychoactive drug
A psychoactive drug or psychotropic substance is a chemical substance that acts primarily upon the central nervous system where it alters brain function, resulting in temporary changes in perception, mood, consciousness and behavior.
Certain drugs, such as alcohol and caffeine, are ingested in beverage form; nicotine and THC are often smoked; peyote and psilocybin mushrooms are ingested in botanical form or dried; and certain crystalline drugs such as cocaine and MDMA (ecstasy) are often insufflated.
Psychoactive drugs are commonly prescribed to patients with psychiatric disorders.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Psychoactive   (2307 words)

  
 Psychoactive Substances and Violence
PSYCHOACTIVE SUBSTANCES AND VIOLENCE by Jeffrey A. Roth, Feb. 1994 ISSUES AND FINDINGS Discussed in the Research in Brief: The current status of research on the links connecting violence to alcohol and illegal psychoactive drugs, and evaluations of interventions to prevent violence related to these substances.
Although positive drug test results did not predict significantly higher pretrial rearrest rates, failure to show up for the test was a strong predictor of subsequent new crimes leading to rearrest.
For drug abusers who are not in prison, stays of at least 3 months in therapeutic communities reduce the tendency to commit crime after discharge.
www.lectlaw.com /files/drg06.htm   (4605 words)

  
 Psychoactive Substances and Violence
Illegal drugs and violence are linked primarily through drug marketing: disputes among rival distributors, arguments and robberies involving buyers and sellers, property crimes committed to raise drug money and, more speculatively, social and economic interactions between the illegal markets and the surrounding communities.
Alcohol is the only psychoactive drug that in many individuals tends to increase aggressive behavior temporarily while it is taking effect.
Violence by drug distributors in the course of territorial disputes between rival organizations, threats of violence to make "staff" obey organizational rules, violent punishment of rulebreakers to keep the threats credible, battles with police, and protection of sellers or drugs on the street.
www.druglibrary.org /schaffer/GOVPUBS/psycviol.htm   (5218 words)

  
 Introduction: Drug Use and Dependence: Merck Manual Professional
This anticipation of effect is a powerful factor in the chronic use of psychoactive drugs and, with some drugs, may be the only obvious factor associated with intense craving and apparent compulsive use.
It may involve experimental and recreational use of drugs, which is usually illegal; unsanctioned or illegal use of psychoactive drugs to relieve problems or symptoms; or use of drugs first for the previous 2 reasons but later because of dependence and the need to continue at least partially to prevent withdrawal.
Many recreational drugs (eg, crude opium, alcohol, marijuana, caffeine, hallucinogenic mushrooms, coca leaf) are “natural,” ie, close to plant origin; they contain a mixture of relatively low concentrations of psychoactive compounds and are not isolated psychoactive chemicals.
www.merck.com /mmpe/print/sec15/ch198/ch198a.html   (1339 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal
These drugs may be used recreationally to purposefully alter one's consciousness, as entheogens for ritual or spiritual purposes, as a tool for studying or augmenting the mind, or therapeutically as medication.
Neuroscience of Psychoactive Substance Use and Dependence by the WHO.
many professionals, self-help groups, and businesses specialize in drug rehabilitation, with varying degrees of success.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=psychoactive_drug   (2326 words)

  
 Psychoactive drug information - Search.com
A psychoactive drug or psychotropic substance is a chemical that alters brain function, resulting in temporary changes in perception, mood, consciousness, or behavior.
Such drugs are often used in recreational drug use and as entheogens for spiritual purposes, as well as in medication, especially for treating neurological and psychiatric illnesses.
The following Venn diagram attempts to organize and provide a basic overview of the most common psychoactive drugs into intersecting groups and subgroups based upon pharmacological classification and method of action.
www.search.com /reference/Psychoactive_drug   (875 words)

  
 Fitz Hugh Ludlow Library
Although acquisitions were made in all areas of word, image, and artifact pertaining to psychoactive drug discovery, research and historical usage, the curators collected materials frequently overlooked by institutional libraries.
Illegal drugs have been perennially subjected to fierce taboos, associated with antisocial and criminal behavior patterns, and generally held in contempt by the media and consequently a majority of citizens.
With the U.S. appearing to be on the verge of a period of objective research and reappraisal of drug policy, the printed materials in the Ludlow Library will be of utmost importance for scholars and graduate students studying the complex phenomena of psychoactive drug use.
www.daileyrarebooks.com /ludlow.htm   (2837 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Substance abuse   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The disorder is characterized by a pattern of continued pathological use of a medication, non-medically indicated drug or toxin, that results in repeated adverse social consequences related to drug use, such as failure to meet work, family, or school obligations, interpersonal conflicts, or legal problems.
Drug abuse has a wide range of definitions, all of them relating either to the misuse or overuse of a psychoactive drug or performance enhancing drug for a non-therapeutic or non-medical effect.
Substance abuse is sometimes used as a synonym for drug abuse, drug addiction, and chemical dependency, but actually refers to the use of substances in a manner outside sociocultural conventions.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Substance-abuse   (1643 words)

  
 Approaches to Drug Abuse Counseling
Although initial exposure to psychoactive drugs may have resulted largely from social and cultural factors (including peer pressure), the driving force behind continued and repeated use of these drugs (before pharmacological and physiological addiction set in) is an attempt to qualitatively and quantitatively alter one's experience and internal feeling states.
Psychoactive drugs are used by certain (predisposed) individuals to amplify, modulate, obliterate, or transform certain feelings in ways they have been unable to achieve by other (nonchemical) means.
It also involves helping the client identify his or her ambivalence about stopping psychoactive drug use by objectively exploring both the positive and negative effects of the use and by defining the client's treatment goals and to what extent these are consistent with the program's goals.
www.drugabuse.gov /ADAC/ADAC13.html   (3692 words)

  
 Psychoactive drug - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A psychoactive drug or psychotropic substance is a chemical substance that acts primarily upon the central nervous system where it alters brain function, resulting in temporary changes in perception, mood, consciousness and behavior.
In many countries, there has been a move toward harm reduction by health services, where the use of illicit drugs is neither condoned nor promoted, but services and support are provided to ensure users have the negative effects of their illicit drug use minimised.
However, humanity remains bitterly divided regarding psychoactive drugs, and their value and use has long been an issue of major philosophical and moral contention, even to the point of war (the Opium Wars being a prime example of a war being fought over psychoactives).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Psychoactive_drug   (1089 words)

  
 Psychoactive Drugs - The Body
Psychoactive drugs don't affect the underlying causes of these disorders, but they can provide symptomatic relief to allow people to live more normal lives.
Benzodiazepines are a class of psychoactive drugs used to treat anxiety and insomnia.
Rapid or wild mood swings, with peaks of mania and troughs of depression, are usually treated with lithium, a drug that reduces the intensity of the mania and reduces the frequency of mood swings.
www.thebody.com /pinf/drugbkix.html   (868 words)

  
 Drug and Alcohol Terminology
A drug is a substance other than food that is taken to obtain a desired effect on the mind or body.
When use of the drug stops, the body fails to function normally because it has adjusted to compensate for the presence of the drug, and this abnormal functioning is felt as withdrawal.
This means that when you stop using one drug and begin to experience withdrawal, prescribed use of another drug in the same class might stop or decrease the severity of withdrawal.
www.bankhead.net /BoozeAndDrugs/terminology.html   (1411 words)

  
 Drug Abuse
Specific drug action depends on the route of administration, the dose, the presence or absence of other drugs, and the clinical state of the individual.
Animals use the drugs in a similar fashion, and the toxic and withdrawal syndrome of the drugs is indistinguishable.
The use of this drug is gratefully on the decline.
www.robertperkinson.com /the-drugs.htm   (5232 words)

  
 Psychoactive Drugs: Scientific Facts on Psychoactive Drugs Tobacco, Alcohol, and Illicit Substances
Psychoactive drugs are substances that can alter the consciousness, mood, and thoughts of those who use them.
A drug-dependent person may experience cravings for the drug and difficulty in controlling its consumption, suffer from withdrawal symptoms when use of the drug is reduced or discontinued, and need increasing doses of the drug to feel its effects (tolerance).
Drug use may either bring about mental illness, or it may be a way of easing some of the symptoms of a mental disorder or the side effects of medication.
www.greenfacts.org /en/psychoactive-drugs   (1435 words)

  
 ecstasy addiction drug treatment rehabilitation program by ecstasy 2.com
MDMA (3, 4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine), commonly referred to as Ecstasy, is a psychoactive drug possessing stimulant and hallucinogenic properties.
MDMA or ecstasy is a Schedule I synthetic, psychoactive drug possessing stimulant and hallucinogenic properties.
The drug is sold in bulk quantity at the mid-wholesale level in the United States for approximately eight dollars per dosage unit.
www.ecstasy2.com   (1150 words)

  
 Psychoactive drug - RecipeFacts   (Site not responding. Last check: )
A psychoactive drug or psychotropic substance is a chemical that acts primarily upon the central nervous system, but also to a lesser extent upon the autonomic nervous system and the peripheral nervous system.
While some drugs affect neurons presynaptically, others act postsynaptically and some drugs don't even affect the synapse, working on neural axons instead.
However, humanity remains bitterly divided regarding psychoactive drugs, and their value and use has long been an issue of major philosophical and moral contention, even to the point of war (the Opium Wars being a prime example of a war being fought over psychoactives).
www.recipeland.com /facts/Psychoactive_drug   (842 words)

  
 UNODC - Terminology and Information on Drugs - Page 27
The propensity of a particular psychoactive substance to be susceptible to abuse, defined in terms of the relative probability that use in the substance will result in social, psychological and physical problems for an individual or for society.
Usage of the term 'illicit drug' should be avoided, as it is the manufacture, distribution, use etc. of a drug which is illicit, but not the substance itself.
The distinct feature of 'psychedelic'; drugs is their capacity to induce states of altered perception, thought and feeling that are not experienced otherwise except in dreams or at times of religious exaltation; they can, but not necessarily have to produce overt hallucinations.
www.unodc.org /unodc/report_1998-10-01_1_page027.html   (1636 words)

  
 Harm reduction, a framework for incorporating science into drug policy
Drug policies cannot be based on a utopian belief that nonmedical drug use will be eliminated.
Less harmful drug use could be based on new drugs, new methods of administration for current drugs (such as nicotine inhalers, which would not produce carcinogenic smoke), and new social customs to reduce drug-related harm (such as designated driver programs and injection without sharing the injection equipment).
There are also developments-the increased role of drug injection in HIV transmission, (9) the recent increase in marijuana and LSD use among youth, (12) the potential banning of tobacco by the Food and Drug Administration, the cost of incarcerating illicit drug users - that may force a reexamination of policies toward nonmedical drug use.
www.drugtext.org /library/articles/harmred2.html   (1568 words)

  
 InfoFacts - MDMA (Ecstasy)
MDMA (3,4 methylenedioxymethamphetamine) is a synthetic, psychoactive drug chemically similar to the stimulant methamphetamine and the hallucinogen mescaline.
MDMA is an illegal drug that acts as both a stimulant and psychedelic, producing an energizing effect, as well as distortions in time and perception and enhanced enjoyment from tactile experiences.
Other drugs chemically similar to MDMA, such as MDA (methylenedioxyamphetamine, the parent drug of MDMA) and PMA (paramethoxyamphetamine, associated with fatalities in the U.S. and Australia) are sometimes sold as ecstasy.
www.nida.nih.gov /Infofax/ecstasy.html   (1031 words)

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