Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Pterygium


Related Topics

In the News (Fri 31 Oct 14)

  
  MR Imaging of Popliteal Pterygium Syndrome in Pediatric Patients -- Donnelly et al. 178 (5): 1281 -- American Journal ...
or abnormal posterior with proximity to the popliteal pterygium,
Pterygium is low-signal narrow cord with wider "belly" of tissue (arrowheads) at its superior portion that is isointense to muscle in signal intensity.
or at the posterior margin of the pterygium [1, 4].
www.ajronline.org /cgi/content/full/178/5/1281   (1800 words)

  
 Pterygium | Pterygium Surgery | Pterygium Removal | Pterygium Treatment | Union City | Mountain View | San Francisco ...
A pterygium (from the Greek word pterygion for wing) is a slightly elevated, superficial, wing-shaped, fleshy conjunctival growth that covers and alters the shape of the cornea.
Most patients with pterygium contact ophthalmologists either due to concern regarding the appearance of the lesion, or because the lesion is irritating the eye or it is adversely affecting vision.
The risks of pterygium excision surgery are low and, in general, if the pterygium is excised before it encroaches to the center area of the cornea, the prognosis for post-operative vision is excellent.
www.neovisioneyecenter.com /pterygium.html   (1251 words)

  
 Pterygium, Pinguecula, Chalazion and Sties
A pterygium is a fleshy, wedge shaped growth on the cornea of the eye.
A pterygium is an abnormal growth on the cornea of the eye.
A chalazion appears as a swollen area, (small lump) on the upper or lower eyelid and is caused by the obstruction of the orifice of a tarsal gland in the eyelid.
www.apagrafix.com /patiented/PTE001/pterygium.HTM   (1087 words)

  
 Dr. Koop - Pterygium and Pinguecula- Health Encyclopedia and Reference
A pterygium is a fleshy growth that invades the cornea (the clear front window of the eye).
Although pterygium and pinguecula sound like mysterious, arcane diseases, they are actually quite common, usually benign eye conditions.
First, vision may be affected by a pterygium large enough to involve the cornea's center visual zone or that causes astigmatism.
www.drkoop.com /encyclopedia/408/392.html   (836 words)

  
 Pterygium   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-11)
Pterygiums (tur-IJ-ee-um) are growths on the outside of the eye which usually form in the areas where the eye is most exposed to sunlight and ambient atmosphere.
Pterygiums can be unilateral or bilateral and may progress slowly toward the center of the cornea or may be inactive and not show further growth.
Though a pterygium is not a serious condition and does not degenerate into anything more serious, their growth can be rapid and cause visual distortion and be a cosmetic problem.
www.westcoasteyecare.com /pterygium.html   (445 words)

  
 Pterygium - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Pterygium usually refers to a benign growth of the conjunctiva.
It is caused principally by ultraviolet-light exposure (e.g.
It has an advancing portion called the head of the pterygium, which is connected to the main body of the pterygium by the neck.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Pterygium   (261 words)

  
 A guide to pterygiums and pterygium surgery   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-11)
A pterygium is a growth of scar tissue and blood vessels on the sun-exposed surface of the eye in response to ultraviolet damage from the environment.
A pterygium often grows in a "wing" shape (pterygos in Greek is wing), which extends across the cornea towards the pupil.
If the pterygium is outside the pupil any faint remaining scar that is not cosmetically visible is of no importance but if the remaining scar is in the pupil the vision is affected permanently.
www.cleareyeclinic.com /pterygium.html   (855 words)

  
 Pterygium Removal Surgery Pterygia Eye Growth Terygium Terygia Terygiam Pyteryium
In pterygium surgery, the abnormal tissue is removed from the cornea and sclera.
Pterygium (terygium, terygia) eye growth: Surgical excision of pterygia is indicated only for unacceptable cosmesis and/or significant encroachment of the visual axis.
A pterygium is fleshy tissue that grows in a triangular shape over the cornea (the transparent part or front window of the eyeball).
www.harvardeye.com /pterygium.html   (1321 words)

  
 NeoVision Management
A: If pterygium is interfering in your field of vision, the procedure may be covered as a "medically necessary" surgery.
Pterygium surgery is commonly done on an outpatient basis.
If pterygium is interfering in your field of vision, the procedure may be covered as a "medically necessary" surgery and some insurance plans will pay for all or part of the surgery.
www.neovisioneyecenter.com /pterygium_faq.html   (1983 words)

  
 MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: Pterygium
Pterygium is tissue that grows from the conjunctiva of the eye onto the surface of the cornea.
A pterygium is a nonmalignant growth of the conjunctiva (overlying skin around the eye).
The primary symptom of a pterygium is a painless area of elevated white tissue, with blood vessels on the inner or outer edge of the cornea.
www.nlm.nih.gov /medlineplus/ency/article/001011.htm   (437 words)

  
 Pterygium Surgery Treatement Pyteria Eye Growth San Clemente Laguna Hills California
Pterygium Pterygium Surgery Pterygium Treatement : A pterygium is a growth of scar tissue and blood vessels on the sun-exposed surface of the eye in response to ultraviolet damage from the environment.
Pterygium (pronounced "tur-RIDGE-ium") is a benign thickening of the outer coating (conjunctiva) of the eye that grows onto the cornea.
In pterygium surgery, the abnormal tissue is removed from the cornea and sclera (white of the eye).
www.harvardeye.com /procedures/pterygium.html   (1670 words)

  
 Berg Eye Center - pterygium
A pterygium is a wedge-shaped fibrovascular growth of conjunctiva (the surface tissue of the white of the eye) that extends onto the cornea.
If a pterygium is small but becomes intermittently inflammed, your ophthalmologist may recommend a trial of a mild steroid eye drop during acute inflammatory flares.
In order to prevent regrowth of the pterygium, your ophthalmologist may remove some of the surface tissue of the same eye (conjunctiva) and suture it into the bed of the excised pterygium.
www.bergeye.com /Disorders/pterygium/pterygium.html   (412 words)

  
 Pterygium: Definition, Symptoms, and Treatment - Kellogg Eye Center
A pterygium is a fleshy growth that invades the cornea.
Pterygium may be small or grow large enough to interfere with vision, and commonly occurs on the inner corner of the eye.
When a pterygium becomes red and irritated, topical eyedrops or ointments may be used to help reduce the inflammation.
kellogg.umich.edu /patientcare/conditions/pterygium.html   (218 words)

  
 Eye : Women Beauty
A pterygium is a growth of scar tissue and blood vessels on the sun-exposed surface of the eye in response
The primary symptom of a pterygium is a painless area of elevated white tissue with blood vessels on the inner and/or outer edge of the cornea.
Surgery to remove the pterygium is advisable when the effect on the cornea causes visual defects or when the thickening is causing excessive and recurrent discomfort or inflammation.
www.womenfitness.net /beauty/eye/pterygium.htm   (624 words)

  
 Pterygium and Pinguecula   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-11)
A pterygium is scar tissue that grows over the cornea (the clear front window of the eye).
A pterygium most commonly occurs on the inner corner of the eye, but can appear on the outer corner as well.
When a pterygium becomes red and irritated, eyedrops or ointments may be used to help reduce the inflammation.
www.bouldereyesurgeons.com /redeyes3.htm   (276 words)

  
 Pterygium and Pinguecula
Pterygium (pronounced tur-lj-ee-um) and pinguecula (pronounced pin-GWEK-yoo-la) are growths on the cornea (the clear front window of the eye) and the conjunctiva - the thin, filmy membrane that covers the white part of your eye (sclera).
A pterygium is a growth of fleshy tissue on the conjunctiva that extends over the cornea (the clear front window of the eye).
When a pterygium or pinguecula becomes red and irritated, eyedrops or ointments may be used to help reduce inflammation.
www.canovision.com /info/pterygium.htm   (378 words)

  
 Popliteal Pterygium Syndrome
Children with Popliteal Pterygium Syndrome may also have abnormal bands of fibrous tissue on the gums (gingival synechiae) and/or between the upper (maxilla) and lower (mandible) bones of the jaws (syngnathia), causing difficulties in opening the mouth.
In severe cases of Popliteal Pterygium Syndrome, malformations of the arms and legs (extremities) may be present including absence (agenesis) or underdevelopment (hypoplasia) of the fingers and/or toes, abnormal outward (valgus) or inward (varus) bending of the feet, and/or malformation (dysplasia) of the nails.
The firm diagnosis of Popliteal Pterygium Syndrome is difficult because of the wide variability of the disorder among affected individuals and the possible confusion with Van der Woude Syndrome.
hw.healthdialog.com /kbase/nord/nord1069.htm   (2415 words)

  
 Pinguecula and pterygium
Pinguecula and pterygium are both non-malignant, slow-growing proliferations of conjunctival connective tissue in the eye.
Some people with a pterygium are also asymptomatic; some feel like they have a foreign body in their eye.
Surgery to remove the pinguecula or pterygium is advisable when the effect on the cornea causes visual defects or when the thickening is causing excessive and recurrent discomfort or inflammation.
www.lifesteps.com /gm/Atoz/ency/pinguecula_and_pterygium_pr.jsp   (864 words)

  
 Pterygium
Pterygiums are nourished by tiny capillaries that supply blood to the tissue.
As the pterygium develops, it may alter the shape of the cornea, causing astigmatism.
Since pterygiums are most commonly caused by sun exposure, protecting the eyes from sun, dust and wind is recommended.
www.stlukeseye.com /Conditions/Pterygium.asp   (225 words)

  
 Eye Conditions > Pterygium -- EyeMDLink.com
A pterygium is a triangular shaped, slightly elevated, and often red lesion, which may occur on the surface of the eye, usually on the nasal side of the cornea.
Typically, the pterygium is first noticed on the conjunctiva (white of the eye), and then is noted to gradually grow onto the cornea of the eye.
Excision of a pterygium may entail a conjunctival transplant (from the same, or opposite eye) or application during surgery of an antimetabolite solution (e.g., mitomycin C).
www.eyemdlink.com /Condition.asp?ConditionID=369   (336 words)

  
 St. Luke's EyeCare Network
The capillaries nourishing the tissue may remain dormant, preventing the pterygium from growing over the central cornea.
If the pterygium does grow over the cornea, the vision may be affected and surgical removal is necessary.
Since pterygium is most commonly caused by sun exposure, protecting the eyes from sun, dust and wind is recommended.
www.eyesod.com /dz/pterygium.htm   (148 words)

  
 Buzard Eye Institute for Corneal and Refractive Surgery   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-11)
A pingueculum is an elevated mass of thickened yellow tissue typically on the nasal side of the eye, commonly seen in dry, dusty and windy environments.
A pterygium is a triangular shaped lesion that differs from a pingueculum in that it extends over the cornea, or colored portion of the eye.
Pterygium can cause diminished vision due to induced astigmatism and the physical placement of the lesion over the visual axis.
www.buzard.com /Patient/Surgeries/Pterygium/Pteryg1.htm   (367 words)

  
 Pinguecula and Pterygium - AllAboutVision.com
Pterygia are wedge- or wing-shaped growths of benign fibrous tissue with blood vessels (fibrovascular), typically located on the surface tissue of the sclera.
If a pterygium is small but becomes inflamed, your eye doctor may prescribe lubricants or possibly a mild steroid eye drop to reduce swelling and redness.
To prevent regrowth after the pterygium is surgically removed, your eye surgeon may suture or glue a piece of surface eye tissue onto the affected area.
www.allaboutvision.com /conditions/pinguecula.htm   (913 words)

  
 Eye Advisor 2006.2: Pingueculum and Pterygium
A pterygium is a wing-shaped growth on the conjunctiva that starts in the corner of your eye like a pingueculum.
For this reason, your surgeon may choose to also move a normal piece of tissue from another part of your eye and put it over the area where the pterygium was removed.
Pterygium and pingueculum happen more frequently in people who grew up in sunny and windy areas.
www.fairview.org /healthlibrary/content/print_ea_pterping_oph.htm   (444 words)

  
 eMedicine - Pterygium : Article by Jerome P Fisher, MD, FACS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-11)
It is more common for the pterygium to present on the nasal conjunctiva and to extend onto the nasal cornea, although it can present temporally, as well as in other locations.
Scarring of the medial rectus muscle is the most common cause of diplopia in patients with pterygium who have not yet undergone surgical excision.
The most common complication of pterygium surgery is the recurrence of the lesions postoperatively.
www.emedicine.com /oph/topic542.htm   (2234 words)

  
 Handbook of Ocular Disease Management - Pterygium
In most cases, routine ocular evaluation reveals pterygia in asymptomatic individuals or in patients who present with cosmetic concern about a tissue "growing over the eye." In some instances, the vascularized pterygium may become red and inflamed, motivating the patient to seek immediate care.
Rarely, the pterygium may induce irregular corneal warpage, or even obscure the visual axis of the eye, resulting in diminished acuity.
Clinical inspection of pterygia reveals a raised, whitish, triangular wedge of fibrovascular tissue, whose base lies within the interpalpebral conjunctiva and whose apex encroaches the cornea.
www.revoptom.com /handbook/sect2i.htm   (651 words)

  
 Visionary Ophthalmology: Pterygium Surgery
A Pterygium is a growth of the conjunctiva, the thin, transparent tissue that covers the outer surface of the eye and secretes oils and mucous to help lubricate the eye.
The pterygium is almost always noticeable and can cause redness, excessive tears, and eye irritation.
If you have a growth on your conjunctiva, and think it may be a pterygium, please call and schedule an appointment with Dr. Martinez.
www.refractivedoc.com /pterygium_surgery.html   (201 words)

  
 Signs of Pterygium - WrongDiagnosis.com
The phrase "signs of Pterygium" should, strictly speaking, refer only to those signs and symptoms of Pterygium that are not readily apparent to the patient.
The word "symptoms of Pterygium" is the more general meaning; see symptoms of Pterygium.
This medical information about signs and symptoms for Pterygium has been gathered from various sources, may not be fully accurate, and may not be the full list of Pterygium signs or Pterygium symptoms.
www.wrongdiagnosis.com /p/pterygium/signs.htm   (321 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.