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Topic: Punic Wars


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  Punic Wars - LoveToKnow 1911   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
PUNIC WARS, a name specially appropriated to the wars between Rome and Carthage in the 3rd and 2nd centuries B.C. The origin of these conflicts is to be sought in the position which Rome acquired about 275 B.C. as suzerain and protector of all Italy.
Italian traders were allowed to traffic in munitions of war with the mutineers, and a gross breach of the treaty was perpetrated when a Roman force was sent to occupy Sardinia, whose insurgent garrison had offered to surrender the island (239).
In 216 and 215 the chief seat of war was Campania, where Hannibal vainly attempted to establish himself on the coast and experienced a severe repulse at Nola.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Punic_Wars   (4735 words)

  
 Punic Wars - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The main cause of the Punic Wars was the clash of interests between the existing Carthaginian empire and the expanding Roman sphere of influence.
The Second Punic War (218 BC - 202 BC) is famous for the Carthaginian Hannibal's crossing of the Alps.
Eventually, the war was taken to Africa, and Carthage was defeated at the Battle of Zama, its territory being reduced to the city itself in a striking loss of power.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Punic_Wars   (2084 words)

  
 Punic Wars - Crystalinks
The primary cause of the Punic Wars was the clash of interests between the expanding Carthaginian and Roman spheres of influence.
The Third Punic War was fought between Carthage and the Roman Republic from 149 BC to 146 BC.
In the years between the Second and Third Punic Wars, Rome was engaged in the conquest of the Hellenistic empires to the east and ruthlessly suppressing the Iberian people in the west, although they had been essential to the Roman success in the Second Punic War.
www.crystalinks.com /punicwars.html   (3919 words)

  
 Punic Wars - Search View - MSN Encarta
Punic Wars, name given to the three wars between Rome and Carthage in the 3rd and 2nd centuries bc.
The adjective Punic (Latin Punicus) is derived from Poeni, the name by which the Carthaginians, being of Phoenician descent, were known to the Romans.
The First Punic War (264-241 bc) was the outcome of growing political and economic rivalry between the two nations.
encarta.msn.com /text_761562033__1/Punic_Wars.html   (692 words)

  
 Punic Wars - HighBeam Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
PUNIC WARS [Punic Wars] three distinct conflicts between Carthage and Rome.
The second war directly pitted the ambitions of the two commercial powers; the initial area of conflict was Sicily.
The Third Punic War, 149-146 BC, originated, like the others, in a deliberate Roman aggression, the result of agitation by Cato the Elder for the destruction of Carthage.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-punicw1ar.html   (754 words)

  
 Punic Wars - Military History Wiki
The primary purpose of the Punic Wars was Roman territorial expansion.
The First Punic War (264 BC - 241 BC) was primarily a naval war.
The Second Punic War (218 BC - 202 BC) is famous for Hannibal's crossing of the Alps.
www.militaryhistorywiki.org /index.php?title=Punic_Wars   (209 words)

  
 Phoenicia, Phoenician Wars
From the middle of the 3rd century to the middle of the 2nd century BC, Carthage was engaged in a series of wars with Rome.
Although accused of having misconducted the war, he was made a suffete (a civil magistrate) in addition to retaining his military command, and as suffete he was able to overthrow the power of the oligarchic governing faction at Carthage and bring about certain administrative and constitutional changes.
Soon, however, the presence of Hannibal and the sound advice he gave concerning the conduct of the war became a source of embarrassment, and he was sent to raise and command a fleet for Antiochus in the Phoenician cities.
phoenicia.org /punicwar.html   (3614 words)

  
 Punic wars   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Collective name on the wars between the Punic (the Romans used the name Poeni on the people of Carthage) city state of Carthage (now outside Tunis, Tunisia) and Rome, the first war starting in 264 BCE, and the last ending in 146.
The wars ended with a strong destruction of Carthage, that ended the city's period as an independent power house and a important trade centre.
But the memory of the former Punic wars was strong in Rome; many hated the Carthaginians especially because there seemed to be nothing that could force them on their knees.
i-cias.com /e.o/punic_wr.htm   (967 words)

  
 First Punic War, 264-241 BC
Syracuse remained a loyal ally of Rome throughout the rest of the war, and her aid was invaluable in maintaining supplies to the Roman forces on the island.
In 250, the Romans began their siege of Lilybaeum, one of the most active sieges of the war, but despite the best efforts of the Romans, the city did not fall, and the siege continued for the remaining nine years of the war.
At the start of the war, Carthage was by far the greater naval power, with what was probably close to a standing navy, while Rome herself had no navy, instead relying on those of her allies that had a naval tradition.
www.historyofwar.org /articles/wars_punic1.html   (2652 words)

  
 The Conquest of Italy, the Punic wars and Carthage
The Conquest of Italy and the Punic Wars
The Roman conquest of Italy, the Punic wars and Carthage
The war was waged between the years 264 and 241BC and resulted in a clear victory for Rome.
www.mariamilani.com /ancient_rome/rome_punic_carthage.htm   (752 words)

  
 Third Punic War - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Third Punic War (149 to 146 BC) was the third and last of the Punic Wars fought between the former Phoenician colony of Carthage, and the Roman Republic.
The war was a minor engagement which consisted of a single action, the Battle of Carthage, but resulted in the complete destruction of the city of Carthage, the annexation of all remaining Carthaginian territory by Rome, and the death or enslavement of the entire Carthaginian population.
In the years between the Second and Third Punic War, Rome was engaged in the conquest of the Hellenistic empires to the east (see Macedonian Wars, Illyrian Wars, and Antiochus III) and ruthlessly suppressing the Iberian people in the west, although they had been essential to the Roman success in the Second Punic War.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Third_Punic_War   (856 words)

  
 Amazon.com: The Punic Wars: Books: Adrian Goldsworthy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Before the wars, Rome's power was limited to the Italian peninsula; by the end of the wars, Rome was the dominant power in the Mediterranean and was poised on the brink of even greater imperial expansion.
Toward the end of his fascinating history of the Punic Wars, author Adrian Goldsworthy speculates that one of the reasons for Carthage's fall is that the African empire was too exclusively mercantile in its mindset.
Punic Wars by Adrian Goldsworthy proves to be a well written and well researched book on the series of wars fought between the North African city of Carthage and the Roman Republic.
www.amazon.com /Punic-Wars-Adrian-Goldsworthy/dp/0304352845   (2594 words)

  
 Rome: The Punic Wars
The First Punic War: 264-241 BC    The First Punic War broke out in 264 BC; it was concentrated entirely on the island of Sicily.
The end result of the second Punic War, in the end, was the domination of the known world by Rome.
The Third Punic War: 149-146 BC    In the years intervening, Rome undertook the conquest of the Hellenistic empires to the east.
www.wsu.edu:8080 /~dee/ROME/PUNICWAR.HTM   (1868 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Punic Wars   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Punic Wars PUNIC WARS [Punic Wars] three distinct conflicts between Carthage and Rome.
He was assigned the command in Sicily in 247 in the First Punic War (see Punic Wars).
It was part of the Carthaginian empire until Masinissa, ruler of E Numidia, allied himself (c.206 BC) with Rome in the Punic Wars.
www.encyclopedia.com /articles/10635.html   (634 words)

  
 The Punic Wars (264-241, 218-201, 149-146 B.C.)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The Second Punic War, by far the greatest struggle in which either power engaged, had thus ended in the complete triumph of Rome, although not because of any faultiness in the Carthaginians' method of attack.
After the Second Punic War, Carthage had recovered to the point that in 191 it offered to repay the remainder of the 50-year tribute of 200 talents per year in one lump sum.
The war against Carthage, with its prospects of rich booty, presented no recruiting problems for the Romans: huge land and naval forces were sent out under both consuls of 149, Lucius Marcius Censorinus and Manius Manilius.
www.thelatinlibrary.com /imperialism/notes/punicwars.html   (3632 words)

  
 Punic Wars - Search Results - MSN Encarta   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The Punic Wars were three wars between Rome and Carthage.
The Carthaginian commander Hannibal invaded Italy during the second Punic War.
The Romans captured Carthage in the third Punic War and destroyed the city.
ca.encarta.msn.com /Punic_Wars.html   (262 words)

  
 History of THE PUNIC WARS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
They are known as the Punic Wars because the Carthaginians are in origin Phoenician (punicus in Latin).
The first war flares up in Sicily, an island disputed between Greek colonies at its eastern end and Carthaginian settlements in the west.
And she is to submit to Rome in all matters of war and foreign policy.
www.historyworld.net /wrldhis/PlainTextHistories.asp?historyid=ac53   (2046 words)

  
 Compare Prices and Read Reviews on The Punic Wars at Epinions.com
The Punic Wars were three separate conflicts between the Italian city of Rome and the North African empire of Carthage between the years 264 BC and 146 BC.
The first Punic War consisted of only a few major land battles, and saw an unusual major military defeat for Roman forces when they invaded Africa and were routed by the Carthaginians.
The Third Punic War began in 149BC and was instigated by the Romans, who by this time were the far superior power.
www.epinions.com /content_97042927236   (888 words)

  
 Victori - The Roman Military | The Punic Wars
The most influential wars in Roman history has to be the series of Punic wars fought against the people of Carthage.
The first Punic war was set on the backdrop of Sicily and its smaller surrounding islands.
This is the most famous Punic war because it has one of the most creative and oddest military maneuvers of all time.
www.numbera.com /rome/history/punicwar.aspx   (506 words)

  
 The Punic Wars (264-241, 218-202, 149-146 B.C.)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
All three wars were won by Rome, which subsequently emerged as the greatest military power in the Mediterranean Sea.
Hannibal's conquest of the Roman town of Sagunto in Spain led to a new declaration of war by Rome.
The second war between Rome and Carthage was one of the great military conflicts of the ancient world.
www.thelatinlibrary.com /imperialism/notes/punicwars1.html   (1237 words)

  
 Punic Wars - MSN Encarta
Introduction; First Punic War; Second Punic War; Third Punic War
After building their first large navy, the Romans defeated a Carthaginian fleet off the Sicilian port of Mylae (see Mylae, Battle of) in 260 bc, but failed to capture Sicily.
A minor Carthaginian breach of treaty gave the pretext for the Third Punic War (149-146 bc), in which the Romans, led by Scipio the Younger, captured the city of Carthage, razed it to the ground, and sold the surviving inhabitants into slavery.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761562033/Punic_Wars.html   (646 words)

  
 Capua - Punic Wars   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Capua's main role in the Punic Wars was during the Second Punic War.
After the First Punic War, Carthage established a new base in Spain from where they could renew the war against Rome.
In 219 Hannibal, the leader of the Carthaginian army, captured Saguntum on the eastern coast of Spain.
abacus.bates.edu /~jhoffste/punic_wars.htm   (713 words)

  
 First Punic War - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The First Punic War did not endanger the survival of either combatant nation, it was principally a conflict over the island of Sicily, but it did however mark the beginning of Rome's conquest of the Mediterranean.
The series of wars between Rome and Carthage were known to the Romans as the "Punic Wars" because of the Latin name for the Carthaginians: Punici, derived from Phoenici, referring to the Carthaginians' Phoenician ancestry.
Polybius commented that the war was, at the time, the most destructive in terms of casualties in the history of warfare, including the battles of Alexander the Great.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/First_Punic_War   (3810 words)

  
 Punic Wars — FactMonster.com
Punic Wars: Second Punic War - Second Punic War When Hamilcar Barca's son Hannibal took (219) the Spanish city of Saguntum...
Punic Wars: Bibliography - Bibliography The Latin accounts of the wars are biased, and there are no Punic ones; the best...
Carthage, ancient city, N Africa: The Punic Wars and the Decline of Carthage - The Punic Wars and the Decline of Carthage In the 3d cent.
www.factmonster.com /ce6/history/A0840527.html   (226 words)

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