Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: QWERTY


Related Topics
Key

In the News (Tue 2 Sep 14)

  
  What is QWERTY keyboard? - A Word Definition From the Webopedia Computer Dictionary
The arrangement of characters on a QWERTY keyboard was designed in 1868 by Christopher Sholes, the inventor of the typewriter.
QWERTY history and links to educational typing software
Provides the history of the QWERTY keyboard, as well as information on various keyboard arrangements, and links to related typewriter links.
www.webopedia.com /TERM/Q/QWERTY_keyboard.html   (261 words)

  
  The History of Qwerty
As Qwerty was difficult to learn by comparison with the alphabetical layout, courses and armies of typing schools were established to teach it.
In the typewriter age qwerty was an insurmountable obstacle for most beginners; it created a cartel of professional typists and barred the vast majority from access to that simple technology.
Qwerty was not designed to improve typing, but to slow typists down for a primitive typewriter that didn't have return springs.
abckeyboard.co.uk /qwerty.htm   (959 words)

  
  The Curse of Qwerty
We know that QWERTY is the dominant survivor of dozens of keyboard designs that competed during the early years of the typewriter.
Yet with the QWERTY keyboard, 20 percent of all English digraphs are typed by adjacent fingers, and more than 4 percent (such as the common ed) by the same finger; corresponding numbers for the Dvorak keyboard are only 2 percent and 1 percent, respectively.
QWERTY gained another undeserved advantage around 1893, when Underwood, Remington’s chief rival, introduced a typewriter with two big virtues: visible typing on the front side of the paper, and a component called an accelerating sublever that permitted faster speed.
www.geocities.com /malibu_malv/curse_qwerty.html   (3575 words)

  
 EH.Net Encyclopedia: Path Dependence
The case of the QWERTY keyboard is considered first, because it has generated the most controversy and it illustrates opposing arguments.
David (1986) noted that the QWERTY keyboard was designed, in part, to reduce mechanical jamming on an early typewriter design that quickly went out of use, while other early keyboards were designed more with the intention of facilitating fast, efficient typing.
Whether the early history of QWERTY was path dependent thus seems to depend largely on the unaddressed question of how much typing instruction was offered directly by suppliers, as Liebowitz and Margolis suggest could have happened, and how much was offered by third parties using QWERTY, as David showed did happen.
eh.net /encyclopedia/article/puffert.path.dependence   (8100 words)

  
 Qwerty (country) - Uncyclopedia
Qwerty is a country located in between the continents of Australia and Mars.
The capitol of Qwerty is the city of Azerty, which is where Joe Shcmo landed in 1111.
Not to be confused with the Aztec, the citizens of Azerty invented the toilet, ice cubes, and the keyboard.
uncyclopedia.org /wiki/Qwerty_(country)   (748 words)

  
 The Curse of QWERTY | Technology | DISCOVER Magazine   (Site not responding. Last check: )
We know that QWERTY is the dominant survivor of dozens of keyboard designs that competed during the early years of the typewriter.
Yet with the QWERTY keyboard, 20 percent of all English digraphs are typed by adjacent fingers, and more than 4 percent (such as the common ed) by the same finger; corresponding numbers for the Dvorak keyboard are only 2 percent and 1 percent, respectively.
QWERTY gained another undeserved advantage around 1893, when Underwood, Remington’s chief rival, introduced a typewriter with two big virtues: visible typing on the front side of the paper, and a component called an accelerating sublever that permitted faster speed.
discovermagazine.com /1997/apr/thecurseofqwerty1099   (3725 words)

  
 QWERTY at AllExperts
The QWERTY design was patented by Christopher Sholes in 1868 and sold to Remington in 1873, when it first appeared in typewriters.
QWERTY also attempted to alternate keys between hands, allowing one hand to move into position while the other hand strikes home a key.
Other QWERTY advocates claim that for a QWERTY typist to switch to Dvorak or another layout requires more effort than initially learning to touch-type, because of having to retrain the fingers' muscle memory.
en.allexperts.com /e/q/qw/qwerty.htm   (1102 words)

  
 The QWERTY Myth: Newsroom: The Independent Institute
That is why the paper on QWERTY published a mere nine years ago by Stan Liebowitz of the University of Texas at Dallas and Stephen Margolis of the University of California, Los Angeles, was called "The Fable of the Keys".
The QWERTY design (patented by Christopher Sholes in 1868 and sold to Remington in 1873) aimed to solve a mechanical problem of early typewriters.
Undaunted by the resilience of the QWERTY myth, Messrs Liebowitz and Margolis devote the first chapter of a forthcoming book on supposed market failures, technology and Microsoft (Winners, Losers, and Microsoft: Competition and Antitrust in High Technology, which will be published in May by the Independent Institute) to the fable of the keys.
www.independent.org /tii/news/990403Liebowitz.html   (937 words)

  
 Tactus Touch Typing Keyboard - About Keyboards - History
Thus, the QWERTY layout effectively reduced the speed at which human users could type, thereby preventing their jamming the mechanism too often.
The introduction of the Dvorak layout, despite its efficiency, was not successful because the QWERTY layout had become a defacto standard and no typewriter manufacturer wished to introduce a product that would require its users to have to retrain the manner in which they worked.
Perhaps the most attention paid to the keyboard as a human interface was by IBM in 1984, and was in regard to the compatibility of the layout of the Personal Computer that it had just developed with the layout of the Selectric™; typewriter.
www.tactuskeyboard.com /history.htm   (964 words)

  
 Science, Technology and Society. Their evolution and mutual feedback
Furthermore, the first QWERTY prototype, a machine invented by C. Sholes in 1860, did not have the paper visible in front of the typist but hidden beneath the machine itself, held by a flat carriage.
But QWERTY head start with the hardware (the first machine) and "software" (the users) could have been easily upset by daily hand to hand competence with better keyboard layouts during those hard times when the typing standards were in the making.
He had memorized the entire QWERTY keyboard and was probably the only one at the time who could write without looking at the keybord; he was effectively the precursor of "touch-typing".
www.cienciateca.com /stsqwerty.html   (1474 words)

  
 Macmillan English Dictionary Resource Site – New Words – QWERTY phenomenon
QWERTY phenomenon has been coined to refer to the general tendency to stick with what is familiar despite the potential for far more efficient alternatives.
The QWERTY keyboard was designed to deliberately mix up frequently used pairs of letters and therefore prevent the jamming of keys which could occur if a typist worked too quickly.
The QWERTY story is an analogy for the way in which biological anomalies get incorporated into living things, such as the existence of wisdom teeth, or the fact that the nerve connections in our eyes are back-to-front.
www.macmillandictionary.com /New-Words/041122-QWERTY-phenomenon.htm   (441 words)

  
 QWERTY - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The QWERTY keyboard layout was devised in the 1860s by the creator of the first modern typewriter, Christopher Sholes, a newspaper editor who lived in Milwaukee.
QWERTY can be used as internet slang for pornography web searching, and the term 'QWERTY-faced' is often used to refer to someone who has fallen asleep at the keyboard, under the comical assumption that such a person would have an imprint of they keyboard on thier face upon waking up.
QWERTY is the working title of a Linkin Park song, and is featured on their sixth Linkin Park Underground CD.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/QWERTY   (1424 words)

  
 Howstuffworks "Why are the keys arranged the way they are on a "QWERTY" keyboard?"
Whatever the reason for the QWERTY layout, it seems pretty unlikely that one of the first keyboard layouts invented would be perfect.
The QWERTY keyboard is very different from the Dvorak keyboard layout.
An independent study in 1956 showed that QWERTY typists and Dvorak typists had about the same rate of speed, and continued studies don't show a clear winner between the two [ref].
www.howstuffworks.com /question458.htm   (473 words)

  
 Eric Shackle's eBook - Typewriter - a one line word
QWERTY is the modern-day layout of letters on most English language computer keyboards and typewriter keyboards.
The explanation of the QWERTY keyboard that I have always read or remembered was that the configuration of the keys was to place the most common characters in position under the fingers in the "home" position and the next common characters in the next most ready positions.
After several years of shaking down, plus improvements in the typewriters, the now standard QWERTY keyboard was the result, and given that all touch-typing systems are taught with this keyboard it is a little late to change it for something logical.
www.bdb.co.za /shackle/articles/typewriter.htm   (2190 words)

  
 keys1   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The measured increase in net typing speed for Qwerty retraining was from twenty-nine to thirty-seven words per minute (28 percent) after an average of 158 hours of training, considerably less than the increase that occurred with the Dvorak keyboard.
Although the Sholes (Qwerty) keyboard fails at conditions A and B (most typing is done on the top row and the balance between the two hands is 57% and 43%), the policy to put successively typed keys as far apart as possible favors factor C, thus leading to relatively rapid typing.
We are told that three Qwerty typists initially scored zero on the typing test but that their scores rose to twenty-nine, thirteen, and sixteen within four days (at 20).
wwwpub.utdallas.edu /~liebowit/keys1.html   (9958 words)

  
 joetsang.net: The QWERTY Question 關於QWERTY
I only came across the QWERTY question in the late 1980s, a few years after I graduated from university.
QWERTY is now used to refer to this particular keyboard arrangement.
He is adamant that "typing on a QWERTY keyboard is unnecessarily tiring, slow, inaccurate, hard to learn, and hard to remember" and that the Dvorak Simplified Keyboard (DSK) is superior.
www.joetsang.net /qwerty/qwerty.html   (736 words)

  
 x360 With a QWERTY Controller - MegaGames console
This month's leaked image comes to us courtesy of Microsoft's XBox 360 and at the center of the latest rumor claiming that the new console may include a qwerty controller in order to enable a few of the XBox Live features.
QWERTY keyboard that will be attached to the controller and will make it easier for Players to send text messages or chat during the game.
Original or not, the image is a pleasant way to bring Microsoft' new console into the limelight on a slow news summer Saturday; so feel free to suggest that the idea of a qwerty controller for x360 is anything from pure genius to a shameful copy of the Jaguar system.
www.megagames.com /news/html/console/x360withaqwertycontroller.shtml   (197 words)

  
 Reason Magazine - Typing Errors
The report states that, because three typists in the QWERTY group had initial net scores of zero words per minute (!), the beginning and ending speeds were calculated as the average of the first four typing tests and the average of the last four typing tests.
The effect of the truncation at the end of the measuring period also decreases the reported gains for the QWERTY typists, though the size of this distortion cannot be determined from the report.
It unreservedly concluded that retraining typists on Dvorak was inferior to retraining on QWERTY.
www.reason.com /news/show/29944.html   (5478 words)

  
 The Straight Dope: Was the QWERTY keyboard purposely designed to slow typists?
The origin of the QWERTY keyboard, so named because that's what the top row of letter keys spells out, is one of those oft-told tales about how we get stuck with an oddball standard because of a short-sighted decision by some mope(s) in the dawning days of a new technology.
The QWERTY keyboard was designed to place the most commonly used letters on the opposite sides of the keyboard, making jamming mechanically less likely.
Legend has it that the QWERTY keyboard was also made intentionally clumsy (only one vowel in the home row, for instance) in order to slow down typists and further reduce the possibility of jamming.
www.straightdope.com /classics/a1_248.html   (782 words)

  
 Half-QWERTY: A One-handed Keyboard Facilitating Skill Transfer From QWERTY
The technique can be used on an unmodified standard QWERTY keyboard (using only half of the available keys, Figure 1), or with a special half keyboard (Figures 2 and 3).
The original objective of this design was to establish a keyboard for palmtop computers: one that was small yet permitted touch typists to use their existing skills.
These findings, which were confirmed by Munhall and Ostry [10], suggest a predisposition among QWERTY typists to mirror image mapping.
www.billbuxton.com /matias93.html   (3517 words)

  
 No. 719: QWERTY
Q, W, E, R, T, and Y -- QWERTY -- are still the first six letters on the top row of your keyboard.
QWERTY won in 1888, and we still use it.
QWERTY survives because it won a contest a century ago.
www.uh.edu /engines/epi719.htm   (576 words)

  
 qwerty - Definitions from Dictionary.com
Mechanical typewriter patented 1867; the QWERTY layout itself is said to date to 1887; it is not meant to slow down typists, but to separate the letters in common digraphs (-sh-, -ck-, etc.) to reduce jamming of swing-arms in old-style machines.
The QWERTY layout is a fine example of a fossil.
Historical note: The QWERTY layout is a fine example of a fossil.
dictionary.reference.com /browse/qwerty   (590 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.