Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Queen Elizabeth Way


Related Topics

In the News (Wed 21 Aug 19)

  
  Queen Elizabeth Way (QEW) History - The King's Highways of Ontario
Queen Elizabeth was delighted with the honour and agreed to attend a special dedication ceremony in St. Catharines on June 6, 1939.
The section of the QEW from Highway 427 to the Humber River was reconstructed as an 8 to 10-lane freeway in the 1960s and early 1970s, with a short collector-express lane system from Kipling Avenue easterly to Royal York Road.
The QEW is sometimes referred to internally by the Ministry of Transportation as either "Highway 1" or "Highway 451".
www.thekingshighway.ca /Queen_Elizabeth_Way.htm   (1743 words)

  
  Queen Elizabeth Way - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Queen Elizabeth Way was extended further south to Fort Erie after World War II, leaving the QEW's original route to the Rainbow Bridge in Niagara Falls as a spur which later became Highway 420 after reconstruction in 1972.
The QEW was called the Middle Road from 1936 to 1939 as a highway connecting Hamilton with Toronto.
The QEW formerly continued beyond Highway 427 to the old Toronto city limits at the Humber River; this section was downloaded from provincial to municipal ownership in 1997, and became part of the Gardiner Expressway.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Queen_Elizabeth_Way   (1586 words)

  
 Highway 403 (Ontario) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The new QEW not only improved access to the Burlington Skyway, it also allowed for an interchange (a semi-directional "T" junction) to be built for the future Highway 403.
The eastern section of Highway 403 which cut through Missisauga and stretched from QEW in Oakville to Highway 401 was completed in 1982.
However, the long term plans called for Highway 403 to maintain its east/west alignment and completely bypass the QEW until Burlington, making it possible that the short existing connection to the QEW would later be incorporated into the original routing of Highway 407.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ontario_provincial_highway_403   (1716 words)

  
 About Elizabeth I TUDOR (Queen of England)
When Elizabeth was four, her Governess Lady Margaret Bryan transfered to the household of the newly born Prince Edward, and the little girl passed into the care of Catherine Champernowne, the daughter of a solidly respectable gentlefolk from Devonshire who had received an unnusually advanced education for a woman at thet time.
Elizabeth stood in grave danger as her very existence was considered a threat to the Queen and to the Spanish marriage.
Elizabeth may or may not responded, but for the sake of the peaceful transition of power, it was declared that she had gestured for James VI of Scotland to succeed her.
www.tudorplace.com.ar /aboutElizabeth.htm   (5065 words)

  
 Queen Elizabeth and the Church
Elizabeth's religious views were remarkably tolerant for the age in which she lived.
Elizabeth's toleration of Catholics, and her refusal to make changes to the Church she established in 1559, has led some historians to doubt her commitment to her faith - even to assert that she was an atheist, but such statements are misleading.
Elizabeth wanted a Church that would appeal to both Catholics and Protestants, and did not want to move the Church in a more Protestant direction, thus making it more difficult for Catholics to accept the Church than it was already.
www.elizabethi.org /us/elizabethanchurch/queenandchurch.html   (590 words)

  
 In Search of Shakespeare . Elizabeth I | PBS
And so in today's language, Elizabeth was a survivor of childhood sexual abuse at Seymour's hands, and psychological cruelty by her father, factors that influenced her relationship with men thereafter, and perhaps go some way to explaining if not excusing some of the political expediency and brutality of her reign.
Elizabeth was less squeamish about the arrest, torture and eventual execution of others she saw as a threat.
Elizabeth loved the theatre and poetry and was a patron of these, the most commonly exhibited arts during her reign.
www.pbs.org /shakespeare/players/player21.html   (1190 words)

  
 Royalty.nu - Tudor Royal History - Queen Elizabeth I
Elizabeth knew that she could not legally marry without the permission of the king's council, and she refused to be drawn into the Lord Admiral's schemes.
Examines the way Queen Elizabeth I was presented in texts, pictures, and performances; the symbolic manipulation of her body by supporters and enemies; and how her advancing age affected her image.
Elizabeth I: Queen of Tudor England by Myra Weatherly.
www.royalty.nu /Europe/England/Tudor/ElizabethI.html   (4446 words)

  
 Canada Roadtrips - Queen Elizabeth Way
Queen Elizabeth Way, Ontario Highway 405 and Ontario Highway 420 "Bridges to U.S.A." sign on the Niagara-bound QEW in St. Catharines.
Queen Elizabeth Way TO Toronto shield on Bunting Rd. northbound in St. Catharines.
Queen Elizabeth Way yellow Toronto shield on the Toronto-bound QEW in St. Catharines.
www.gribblenation.net /canpics/personal/qew   (532 words)

  
 Queen Elizabeth Way
Queen Elizabeth Way, connecting Toronto with Niagara Falls and Fort Erie, Ont, was Canada's first 4-lane, controlled-access superhighway.
Using the latest concepts in streamlined design, the highway was built to overcome local traffic bottlenecks and to open the province to US motorists entering via the Peace Bridge at Fort Erie.
The highway was officially opened by Queen Elizabeth, queen consort of King George VI, at St Catharines, 7 June 1939.
www.canadianencyclopedia.ca /index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0006609   (106 words)

  
 "Gloriana! The Golden Legend of Elizabeth I"
In Elizabeth's forty-four-year reign (1558-1603), England grew from a small weak nation on the north-west edge of Europe, reeling from three decades of political and religious strife, to a stable world power, challenging Spain's monopoly in the New World and founding a maritime empire of her own.
Elizabeth ended the religious persecutions of her Catholic sister Mary, established the Anglican Church of England, defeated the "invincible" Spanish Armada, kept her nation at peace in a belligerent age, presided over a glittering court, and inspired a Golden Age of Renaissance culture.
Elizabeth's particular genius was knowing how to blend a sacred aura of majesty with the common touch, and a stream of inexpensive books, pamphlets, and engravings from the popular press described and spread her legend to a wider audience through the effective use of the new technology of print.
www.huntington.org /ArtDiv/queen.html   (699 words)

  
 Queen Elizabeth I
Born in 1533 to Henry VIII and his second wife, Anne Boleyn, she was Queen of England from 1558 to her death in 1603.
Elizabeth's reign was marked by her effective use of Parliament and the Privy Council, a small advisory body of the important state officials, and by the development of legal institutions in English counties.
This article is written to give a realistic view of Queen Elizabeth I. It writes of her as neither the most influential nor the most inspirational leader, but probably the millennium's best all-around figure.
departments.kings.edu /womens_history/oldpgs/oelizabeth.html   (537 words)

  
 Queen Elizabeth Way   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Queen Elizabeth Way, connecting Toronto with Niagara Falls and Fort Erie, Ont, was Canada's first 4-lane, controlled-access superhighway.
Using the latest concepts in streamlined design, the highway was built to overcome local traffic bottlenecks and to open the province to US motorists entering via the Peace Bridge at Fort Erie.
The highway was officially opened by Queen Elizabeth, queen consort of King George VI, at St Catharines, 7 June 1939.
www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com /index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0006609   (105 words)

  
 CBC News Indepth: The Royal Family
Elizabeth Alexandra Mary of York was born on April 21, 1926, at her maternal grandparents' home in London, the first child for the Duke and Duchess of York.
Elizabeth's accession to the throne was something of a fluke, the result of the dramatic abdication by her uncle, Edward VIII, to marry the American divorc ée Wallis Simpson.
Elizabeth is one of the wealthiest women in the world, with a net worth of $818 million in 2004, according to Forbes magazine.
www.cbc.ca /news/background/royals/queenelizabeth.html   (878 words)

  
 Boston.com / A&E / Books / History gets in the way of Queen Elizabeth tale
Set in the first year of Elizabeth's reign, during which Robert Dudley was rumored to be the queen's lover, and culminating in Amy Dudley's suspicious death, this hefty new novel confines itself largely to what was known, or at least suspected, of the young queen and her courtier.
Lip service is paid to Elizabeth's earlier years, when she was frequently imprisoned or fearing for her life and had to plot and struggle simply to survive.
Elizabeth in particular is portrayed as having a serious lack of spunk.
www.boston.com /ae/books/articles/2004/12/14/history_gets_in_the_way_of_queen_elizabeth_tale   (807 words)

  
 Queen Elizabeth I | Queen of England
Elizabeth I was born on September 7, 1533 at Greenwich Palace, London, England, an estate of her Father, King Henry VIII.
Elizabeth became Queen of England in 1558 and reigned until her death in 1603.
She was succeeded by James I, son of Mary Queen of Scots and her second husband, Elizabeth's cousin Lord Darnley.
www2.lucidcafe.com /lucidcafe/library/95sep/elizabeth.html   (770 words)

  
 Queen Elizabeth I: Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Elizabeth read out a long speech where she pointed out that whether she got married or not was something that she would decide.
Elizabeth believed that people had the right to enjoy themselves on their one day of rest and refused to allow the bill to become law.
When Elizabeth died in March, 1603, the Tudor dynasty came to an end and the throne was passed to James VI of Scotland.
www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk /TUDelizabeth1.htm   (2092 words)

  
 Queen Elizabeth I: Biography, Portraits, Primary Sources
Elizabeth kept the curtains of the litter pulled back as she entered the city, and the citizens were able to see her pale, frightened face.
Elizabeth was concerned that her imprisonment in the countryside would remove her too much from the public eye and her ceaseless letter-writing was an attempt to reassert her position as princess of England.
Elizabeth was sent to a small manor house a few miles from Oatlands where she played another waiting game, only this time with some measure of freedom and hope.
www.englishhistory.net /tudor/monarchs/eliz1.html   (8660 words)

  
 Queen Elizabeth II attitude
Queen Elizabeth likes to always appear poised and in control; and she hates to show any weakness, vulnerability, or chinks in her armor.
Queen Elizabeth II respects tradition and the time-honored way of doing things, and she feels that there is much to be gained from studying history and also by learning from older, more experienced people.
At times Queen Elizabeth II may feel frustrated because she feels that she is not being perceived very clearly, that she does not make a powerful impression, that she is easily overlooked or discounted.
famous-relationships.topsynergy.com /Queen_Elizabeth_II/Attitude.asp   (1313 words)

  
 King's Highway 403 - www.OntHighways.com
Originally, Highway 403 was to be routed on a new alignment north of the QEW through the northern portions of Burlington and Oakville.
Eastern Terminus: At the 401/410 interchange in Mississauga.
The 403 is four lanes wide from the QEW to the 407.
www.onthighways.com /highway_403.htm   (571 words)

  
 LordSutch.com: QEW Photos (Ontario)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Queen Elizabeth Way links Toronto with the Niagara Falls region of Ontario, including the international border crossings along the Niagara River to New York.
Note that the road is named for the late Queen Mother and not the current British monarch (who had not yet ascended to the throne when the route was opened in 1939).
The first interchange on the Toronto-bound QEW is an exit for Former Hwy 3, which connects Fort Erie with the Windsor/Detroit region of southwest Ontario.
www.lordsutch.com /roads/ontario/qew.html   (440 words)

  
 Queen Elizabeth I | Queen of England
Elizabeth I was born on September 7, 1533 at Greenwich Palace, London, England, an estate of her Father, King Henry VIII.
Elizabeth became Queen of England in 1558 and reigned until her death in 1603.
She was succeeded by James I, son of Mary Queen of Scots and her second husband, Elizabeth's cousin Lord Darnley.
www.lucidcafe.com /lucidcafe/library/95sep/elizabeth.html   (739 words)

  
 Ontario Provincial Highways (400-427 + QEW)
This is due, in part, to the fact that the QEW runs in so many directions along its route: northwest-southeast between Fort Erie and St Catharines, east-west from there into Hamilton, northeast-southwest between Burlington and Toronto, and formerly due east-west in Toronto before being truncated at Hwy 427 in 1998.
The QEW was designed partially as a four-lane divided highway with a three to ten foot median strip, with the remaining less-travelled stretches as undivided highway.
Jct QEW and Gardiner Expwy (Formerly QEW) in Toronto (Etobicoke)
members.aol.com /Hwys/OntHwys/OntHwys400-QEW.html   (7162 words)

  
 Royal Visit - Royal Visit 2005 - Government of Alberta   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II was the guest of honour during a celebration for the renaming of the Provincial Museum of Alberta to the Royal Alberta Museum.
The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh visited Edmonton City Hall in the morning, including a visit, specifically requested by The Queen, with the youth and staff of the Kids in the Hall program and a tour of the facility.
The visit of Her Majesty The Queen and His Royal Highness The Duke of Edinburgh was a unique opportunity for the Royal Couple, and indeed all Canadians, to honour "THE SPIRIT OF NATION BUILDERS" as exemplified by this important anniversary.
www.gov.ab.ca /premier/royalvisit/index_the_visit.cfm   (1304 words)

  
 Ontario Roads - QEW   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Past there, the QEW was given to the city of Toronto and is now known as the Gardiner Expressway east to the end at Don Valley Parkway.
The first photo is SB on the QEW, the second is WB on 420, and the third is somewhere.
The main movement on ON 420 WB is to the QEW NB, since heading SB brings you to NY and you wouldn't have taken 420 away from Niagara Falls when there are good bridges right there.
web.mit.edu /smalpert/www/roads/on/qew   (312 words)

  
 LondonTown.com | Queen Elizabeth Way Guide | Queen Elizabeth Way London, GU22, England, UK | London Streets by Street
Queen Elizabeth Way London, GU22, England, UK
Queen Elizabeth Way is located in the borough of Woking District
The nearest underground station to Queen Elizabeth Way is 'Heathrow Terminal 4 Tube' which is about 345 minutes to the North East.
www.londontown.com /LondonStreets/queen_elizabeth_way_dfe.html   (152 words)

  
 Niagara Falls Directions, Clifton Hill, Text Directions, Maps, Location, Printable, Area, Tourism, Ontario, Canada
Follow the QEW, towards Niagara Falls, to Highway 420 east and proceed past the Rainbow Bridge, turn right on Clifton Hill, the best attractions & hotels are located on the left hand side.
Follow the QEW towards Niagara Falls, to Highway 420 and proceed past the Rainbow Bridge, turn right on Clifton Hill, the best attractions & hotels are located on the left hand side.
Follow the QEW to Highway 420 and proceed past the Rainbow Bridge, turn right on Clifton Hill, the best attractions & hotels are located on the left hand side.
www.cliftonhill.com /niagara_falls_map/list   (1664 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.