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Topic: Quintus Fabius Maximus Cunctator


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In the News (Mon 17 Jun 19)

  
  Biographies: Quintus Fabius Maximus, Cunctator :: 0 A.D. :: Wildfire Games
Quintus Fabius Maximus was a Roman commander and politician during the Second Punic War.
Quintus Fabius Maximus was probably born somewhere around 275 B.C. The exact birth date of Quintus Fabius Maximus is unknown, but estimate place it somewhere in 275.
Quintus’ parents are unknown, but we do know that he was born into the already ancient house of Fabii in Rome.
wildfiregames.com /0ad/page.php?p=7299   (783 words)

  
  Fabius - LoveToKnow 1911
Fabius Maximus, surnamed Rullianus or Rullus, master of the horse in the second Samnite War to L. Papirius Cursor, by whom he was degraded for having fought the Samnites contrary to orders (Livy viii.
Quintus Fabius Maximus, surnamed Verrucosus (from a wart on his lip), Ovicula (" the lamb," from his mild disposition), and Cunctator (" the delayer," from his cautious tactics in the war against Hannibal), grandson of the preceding.
Fabius was a strenuous opponent of the new aggressive policy, and did all he could to prevent the invasion of Africa by Scipio.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Fabius   (1086 words)

  
  Fabius Maximus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
His nickname Cunctator (akin to the English noun cunctation) means "delayer" in Latin, and refers to his tactics in deploying the troops during the Second Punic War.
Fabius was well-aware of the military superiority of the Carthaginians, and when Hannibal invaded Italy he refused to meet him in a pitched battle.
Fabius Maximus was also the name of a close friend of Augustus Caesar cited by Tacitus, who in 13 AD may have been murdered after a supposed visit with the emperor to the island of Planasia to see Postumus Agrippa.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Fabius_Maximus   (736 words)

  
 Australian Information from Wikipedia
His epithet Cunctator (akin to the English noun cunctation) means "delayer" in Latin, and refers to his tactics in deploying the troops during the Second Punic War.
Fabius was well aware of the military superiority of the Carthaginians, and when Hannibal invaded Italy he refused to meet him in a pitched battle.
Quintus Fabius Maximus Verrucosus and Marcus Claudius Marcellus
www.thinkingaustralia.com /thinking_australia/wikipedia/default.php?title=Fabius_Maximus   (950 words)

  
 Fabius - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Fabius was the nomen of the gens Fabia of ancient Rome.
Fabius Maximus Rullianus, five times a consul, was a hero of the Samnite Wars; but even he was eclipsed by the Fabius Maximus who fought against Hannibal in the Second Punic War.
Quintus Fabius Maximus Allobrigicus, consul 121 BC Quintus Fabius Maximus Eburnus, consul 116 BC Quintus Fabius Q.f.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Fabius   (323 words)

  
 Fabius
Fabius was the nomen of the gens Fabia of Ancient Rome.
Quintus Fabius Maximus Allobrigicus, consul 121 BC Quintus Fabius Maximus Eburnus, consul 116 BC Quintus Fabius Q.f.
Quintus Fabius Maximus Servilianus, consul 142 BC Quintus Fabius Maximus Verrucosus, Cunctator - consul
www.ufaqs.com /wiki/en/fa/Fabius.htm   (315 words)

  
 Fabius Maximus -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: )
275 BC-203 BC), called Cunctator (the Delayer;), was a Roman politician and soldier, born in (Capital and largest city of Italy; on the Tiber; seat of the Roman Catholic Church; formerly the capital of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire) Rome around 275 BC and died in Rome in 203 BC.
It was Fabius who formally declared war on the city after the capture of (additional info and facts about Sagonte) Sagonte by (A town in northeast Missouri on the Mississippi River; boyhood home of Mark Twain) Hannibal.
Fabius was well-aware of the military superiority of the Carthaginians, and when Hannibal invaded (A republic in southern Europe on the Italian Peninsula; was the core of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire between the 4th century BC and the 5th century AD) Italy he refused to meet him in a pitched battle.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/f/fa/fabius_maximus.htm   (575 words)

  
 217 BC
The Senate appoint Quintus Fabius Maximus Verrucosus as dictator.
Fabius' delaying policy becomes increasingly unpopular in Rome, and Fabius is compelled to return to Rome to defend his actions under the guise of observing some religious obligations.
This "victory" causes the Romans, disgruntled with Fabius, to elevate Minucius to the equal rank of dictator with Fabius.
en.askmore.net /217_BC.htm   (699 words)

  
 Fabius Maximus - Military History Wiki
His nickname Cunctator (akin to the English language noun cunctation) means "delayer" in Latin, and refers to his tactics in deploying the troops during the Second Punic War.
At the end of Fabius' dictatorship, the command was given back to the consuls Gnaeus Servilius Geminus and Marcus Atilius Regulus and in the following year (216 BC) to the consuls Lucius Aemilius Paullus and Gaius Terentius Varro.
Fabius Maximus was also the name of a close friend of Augustus Caesar cited by Tacitus, who in 13 AD may have been murdered after a supposed visit with the emperor to the island of Planasia to see Postumus Agrippa.
www.militaryhistorywiki.org /index.php?title=Fabius_Maximus&redirect=no   (715 words)

  
 Quintus Fabius Maximus Cunctator - Encyclopedia.com
These cautious delaying tactics (Cunctator means “delayer”) allowed Rome to recover and take the offensive, but Roman impatience led to defeat at the Battle of Cannae.
Ironically, the road is named after the Roman general Quintus Fabius Maximus nicknamed Cunctator (The Delayer) because of his habit of avoiding pitched battles.
The then dictator Quintus Fabius Maximus, known as the 'Cunctator' ('the delayer') for his tactics of avoiding direct confrontation with Hannibal, gradually wore him...
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1B1-364131.html   (304 words)

  
 Fabius. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
B.C., the opponent of Hannibal, was called Cunctator [Lat.,=delayer] because of his tactics, from which the term Fabian, referring to a waiting policy, is derived.
Fabius kept his army always near Hannibal’s but never attacked, harassing Hannibal continually, but never joining battle.
The Romans tired of Fabius’ policy, and he was supplanted (216); the rout at Cannae was the result.
www.bartleby.com /65/fa/Fabius.html   (350 words)

  
 Quintus Fabius Maximus Cunctator --¬† Encyclop√¶dia Britannica
Quintus Fabius Maximus Cunctator portrait on a Roman coin, c.
Roman commander and statesman whose cautious delaying tactics (whence the surname Cunctator, meaning “delayer”) during the early stages of the Second Punic War (218–201) gave Rome time to recover its strength and take the offensive against the invading Carthaginian army of Hannibal.
Fabius was consul in 233 and 228 and censor…;
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9033518   (782 words)

  
 Biographies: Quintus Fabius Maximus, Cunctator :: 0 A.D. :: Wildfire Games
Quintus Fabius Maximus was a Roman commander and politician during the Second Punic War.
Quintus Fabius Maximus was probably born somewhere around 275 B.C. The exact birth date of Quintus Fabius Maximus is unknown, but estimate place it somewhere in 275.
Fabius dispatched various Roman forces into the hills of Italy to tail Hannibal as close as possible with out engaging him in battle, knowing cavalry would be useless in the hills.
www.wildfiregames.com /0ad/page.php?p=7299   (783 words)

  
 Fabius Cunctator   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Fabius takes Tarentum and punished the inhabitants for their defection by condemning them to slavery.
But as soon as he came into employments, his virtues exerted and showed themselves; his reputed want of energy then was recognized by people in general as a freedom of passion; his slowness in words and actions, the effect of a true prudence; his want of rapidity and his sluggishness, as constancy and firmness.
He was five times consul, and in his first consulship had the honour of a triumph for the victory he gained over the Ligurians, whom he defeated in a set battle, and drove them to take shelter in the Alps, from whence they never after made any inroad or depredation upon their neighbours.
www.barca.fsnet.co.uk /fabius-cunctator.htm   (355 words)

  
 History of the Hellenistic and Roman World
Fabius then goes on to magnify the danger to the Roman people should Scipio invade Africa, and after listing a number of examples to show how great the risks to Scipio's army are, goes on to belittle Scipio's achievements in Spain.
Leading the onslaught was Quintus Fabius, who accused him (Scipio) of having all the qualities which inevitably lead to the ruin of military discipline.
The virulent but untrue accusations of Fabius Maximus started a hot debate in the Senate house that lasted for several days; Scipio's opponents alleging that not only was Scipio un-Roman (he was a keen admirer of Greek culture), but even un-soldierly.
www.fenrir.dk /history/index.php?title=Scipio_Africanus_:_Consul_(205_BCE)   (2437 words)

  
 Sonshi Forum - to sonshi: a missing strategist?
When I think of Fabius Maximus, I am mindful that, unlike Varro, he was smart enough to realize that because the Carthiginian Army had such superior horseman and cavalry, Fabius could best serve the Roman Republic by mitigating this Carthigian advantage and keeping the Roman Legions up in the hills.
Fabius benefited from witnessing Hannibal route the Roman Legions and he was smart enough to not repeat the military blunders of his immediate predecessors.
Fabius Maximus shadowed Hannibal's troops and intentionally did not enage them directly in the expectation that Hannibal's lines of communication would eventually become stretched too thin and the Carthaginian's logistics would suffer.
forum.sonshi.com /showthread.php?threadid=1136   (464 words)

  
 John Dickinson and American Constitutionalism
Indeed, the Fabius Letters are a model of moderation and prudence, with their frequent appeals to history to justify the new Constitution and to warn against the danger to the nation should it fail to be ratified.
Fabius, therefore, denies that the composition of the Senate was a mere compromise among the delegates to the Convention.
Both the Fabius Letters and the Federalist Papers, rightly understood, present a modest view of the ends of government as envisioned by the Convention; and the authors of both documents believe that wisdom, virtue, and experience (rather than appeals to abstract rights or a theoretical perfection) form the basis of the American republic.
www.nhinet.org /ahern.htm   (6629 words)

  
 Archive | May 21, 2001 | Fabian Conservatism
But until Fabius came along, they could not stop Hannibal from marching up and down Italy, unraveling everything that the Romans and their Latin allies had created.
Quintus Fabius Maximus Cunctator portrait on a Roman coin, c.
Fabius decided to shadow Hannibal, always pushing here and their, always harassing his supply trains, always re-conquering what Hannibal had just conquered, and never risking a major defeat.
www.enterstageright.com /archive/articles/0501fabian.htm   (1063 words)

  
 Fabius Maximus - TheBestLinks.com - Quintus Fabius Maximus, Augustus, Consul, Carthage, ...   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Fabius Maximus - TheBestLinks.com - Quintus Fabius Maximus, Augustus, Consul, Carthage,...
Quintus Fabius Maximus, Fabius Maximus, Augustus, Consul, Carthage, English...
By keeping his soldiers close to Hannibal's invading forces – while avoiding combat – he was able to harass the Carthaginian foraging parties, limiting Hannibal's ability to wreak destruction while conserving his own military force.
www.thebestlinks.com /Quintus_Fabius_Maximus.html   (225 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Fabius Maximus   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Battle of Lake Trasimene (June 24, 217 BC, April on the Julian calendar) was a Roman defeat in the Second Punic War between the Carthaginians under Hannibal and the Romans under the consul Gaius Flaminius.
Quintus Ennius (239 - 169 BC) was a writer during the period of the Roman Republic, and is often considered the father of Roman poetry.
His cautiousness gave rise to the noun phrase "Fabian strategy." In linguistics, a noun phrase is a phrase whose Head is a noun.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Fabius-Maximus   (1664 words)

  
 Supreme Law School : E-mail : Box 048 : Msg 04822
One of these senators is Quintus Fabius Maximus who rides out >with the surviving senators and returns to a panicked Rome to seize >absolute power in order to protect the empire from the approaching >Hannibal.
During this merciful respite, Quintus >Fabius Maximus is able to muster, group and rally a defence force in Rome >in anticipation of the coming Carthaginian invasion of the capital.
Scipio and Fabius Maximus are historically viewed to be the >cream of the Roman republic’s military leadership.
www.supremelaw.org /sls/email/box048/msg04822.htm   (2855 words)

  
 Fabius Maximus Verrucosus Cunctator Quintus - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Fabius Maximus Verrucosus Cunctator Quintus - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Fabius Maximus Verrucosus Cunctator, Quintus, full name Quintus Fabius Maximus Verrucosus Cunctator (275?-203 bc), Roman statesman and general,...
Roman general and statesman Quintus Fabius Maximus Verrucosus Cuncator developed a successful strategy to defend Rome from the attack of the great...
encarta.msn.com /Fabius_Maximus_Verrucosus_Cunctator_Quintus.html   (153 words)

  
 Fabius biography - S9.com
467, 465, 459 BC - Quintus Fabius Vibulanus was a consul for three times and a member of decemvirate.
203 B.C - His descendant, Quintus Fabius Maximus Verrucosus, the opponent of Hannibal, was called Cunctator because of his tactics, from which the term Fabian, referring to a waiting policy, is derived.
180 BC - Quintus Fabius Labeo became the commander of the fleet in an eastern campaign.
www.s9.com /Biography/Fabius   (225 words)

  
 Fabius Maximus
Quintus Fabius Maximus Cunctator (160 BC - 203 BC) was a Roman general and statesman.
His nickname "Cunctator" (akin to the English noun cunctation) means "delayer" in Latin, and refers to his indecision in deploying the troops during the Carthaginian invasion led by Hannibal.
His overcautiousness gives rise to the noun phrase "Fabian policy."
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/fa/Fabius_Maximus.html   (54 words)

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