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Topic: Quintus Sertorius


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  Quintus Sertorius - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Quintus Sertorius (died 72 BC), Roman statesman and general.
Sertorius proved himself more than a match for his adversaries, utterly defeating their united forces on one occasion near Saguntum.
Sertorius was in league with the pirates in the Mediterranean, was negotiating with the formidable Mithridates, and was in communication with the insurgent slaves in Italy.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Quintus_Sertorius   (785 words)

  
 The Internet Classics Archive | Sertorius by Plutarch
Quintus Sertorius was of a noble family, born in the city of Nursia, in the country of the Sabines; his father died when he was young, and he was carefully and decently educated by his mother, whose name was Rhea, and whom he appears to have extremely loved and honoured.
Sertorius was ordered to raise soldiers and provide arms, which he performed with a diligence and alacrity, so contrasting with the feebleness and slothfulness of other officers of his age, that he got the repute of a man whose life would be one of action.
Sertorius, meantime, showed the loftiness of his temper in calling together all the Roman senators who had fled from Rome, and had come and resided with him, and giving them the name of a senate; and out of these he chose praetors and quaestors, and adorned his government with all the Roman laws and institutions.
classics.mit.edu /Plutarch/sertoriu.html   (3593 words)

  
 Timeline of Portuguese history (Lusitania and Gallaecia) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Quintus Sertorius defeats the generals Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus (previously faithful to Sertorius) and Quintus Caecilius Metellus Pius at the Battle of Saguntum.
Quintus Sertorius founds a Roman school for the children of its local allies in Lusitania.
Quintus Sertorius is assassinated at a banquet, Marcus Perperna Vento, it seems, being the chief instigator of the deed due to his grudge against the privileges of non-Roman military commanders.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Timeline_of_Portuguese_history_(Lusitania_and_Gallaecia)   (3222 words)

  
 Plutarch's Life of Sertorius
[2] Quintus Sertorius was of a noble family, born in the city of Nursia, in the country of the Sabines; his father died when he was young, and he was carefully and decently educated by his mother, whose name was Rhea, and whom he appears to have extremely loved and honored.
Sertorius delayed the time till the evening, considering that the darkness of the night would be a disadvantage to his enemies, whether flying or pursuing, being strangers, and having no knowledge of the country.
Sertorius, being offended with their ill behavior, or perceiving the state of their minds by their way of speaking and their unusually disrespectful manner, changed the posture of his lying, and leaned backward, as one that neither heard nor regarded them.
www.bostonleadershipbuilders.com /plutarch/sertorius.htm   (5880 words)

  
 Sertorius   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Quintus Sertorius was born of equestrian rank in the Sabine city of Nursia.
Sertorius appeared destined to be elected to the tribunate in 88 B.C. but for some reason, lost in the political frenzy of the day, his candidacy was blocked by Sulla.
Sertorius introduced Roman weapons and military fighting methods, and military tactics to his Lusitanian troops, He was, however, careful to keep power in Roman hands, he addressed the Romans with him as "the Senate", and always insisted that his fight was against the Roman regime of Sulla and not against Rome itself.
idcs0100.lib.iup.edu /westcivi/sertorius.htm   (1485 words)

  
 Quintus Sertorius
On Sulla's return from the East in 83, Sertorius went to Spain, where he represented the Marian or democratic party, but without receiving any definite commission or appointment.
Having been obliged to withdraw to Africa in consequence of the advance of the forces of Sulla over the Pyrenees, he carried on a campaign in Mauretania, in which he defeated one of Sulla's generals and captured Tingis (Tangier[?]).
In 72 BC he was assassinated at a banquet, Perperna Vento, it seems, being the chief instigator of the deed.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/qu/Quintus_Sertorius.html   (633 words)

  
 Printable Version on Encyclopedia.com
Sertorius was appointed governor of Farther Spain in 83 BC but fled to Africa to escape the reprisals of Sulla.
Sertorius had attempted to build a stronger national feeling among the local leaders by founding a senate and a school for their sons.
The identification of Sertorius with local interests led, long after, to a mistaken glorification of him as a Portuguese patriot.
www.encyclopedia.com /printable.aspx?id=1E1:Sertoriu   (124 words)

  
 Quintus Sertorius   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Brave and kindly and gifted with a telling eloquence Sertorius was just the man impress them favourably and the native militia he organized spoke of him as the Hannibal." Many Roman refugees and deserters joined and with these and his Spanish volunteers completely defeated one of Sulla's generals and Q.
Sertorius himself more than a match for his utterly defeating their united forces on one near Saguntum.
Sertorius was in league with the pirates the Mediterranean was negotiating with the formidable Mithridates and was in communication with the slaves in Italy.
www.freeglossary.com /Sertorius   (947 words)

  
 The Baldwin Project: Our Young Folks' Plutarch by Rosalie Kaufman
Sertorius disguised himself as one of them so well that he was not discovered, and thus he was enabled to mingle with their troops and find out not only what they proposed doing, but their method of fighting and their habits.
Sertorius defeated and killed him, and took nearly all his army prisoners; but he very wisely restored to the natives all their possessions and government, taking nothing for himself but what they offered him, and thus making himself exceedingly popular.
Sertorius stroked the animal, and received it as though he had not seen it before, while tears filled his eyes, and the people gazed at him with wonder as a creature beloved of the gods.
www.mainlesson.com /display.php?author=kaufman&book=plutarch&story=sertorius   (2633 words)

  
 QUINTUS SERTORIUS - LoveToKnow Article on QUINTUS SERTORIUS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Brave and kindly, and gifted with a rough telling eloquence, Sertorius was just the man to impress them favorably, and the native militia, which he organized, spoke of him as the new Hannibal.
Sertorius was in league with the pirates in the Mediterranean, was negotiating with the formidable Mithradates, and was in communication with the insurgent slaves in Italy.
In 72 he was assassinated at a banquet, Perperna, it seems, being the chief instigator of the deed.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /S/SE/SERTORIUS_QUINTUS.htm   (695 words)

  
 Kolbe's Greatest Books: Plutarch's Lives, Sertorius, Eumenes
This was peculiar to Sertorius, that the chief command was, by his whole party, freely yielded to him, as to the person of the greatest merit and renown, whereas Eumenes had many who contested the office with him, and only by his actions obtained the superiority.
Sertorius, being already in high esteem for his former services in the wars, and his abilities in the senate, was advanced to the dignity of a general; whereas Eumenes obtained this honor from the office of a writer, or secretary, in which he had been despised.
Sertorius put an end to his dangers as often as he was victorious in the field, whereas the victories of Eumenes were the beginning of his perils, through the malice of those that envied him.
www.greatestbooks.org /studentlibrary/gbooks/Plutarch/life5.htm   (10480 words)

  
 Sertorius: Part 1/2   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Quintus Sertorius was from the Sabine town of Nussa.
Sertorius lost his horse and was wounded but he managed to swim to safety over the Rhone.
Sertorius stood for election as tribune but failed to win, and he blamed Sulla for this, so he naturally allied himself with the Marians in the dispute over whether Sulla or Marius should be sent out to fight against Mithridates in the East.
www.suite101.com /article.cfm/18302/107643   (420 words)

  
 Sertorius Quintus: Free Encyclopedia Articles at Questia.com Online Library   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Sertorius was appointed governor of Farther Spain in 83 b.c.
The reputation of Sertorius was such that neither of the...half of the province against Sertorius and his generals.
Sertorius was appointed governor of Farther Spain...by Perperna, a disaffected officer.
www.questia.com /library/encyclopedia/101270327   (706 words)

  
 Lucius Cornelius Sulla - Wikipedia
In 104 v.C. trok Gaius Marius met Sulla en Quintus Sertorius naar Gallia Transalpina om er de Germanen op te wachten, die in beweging waren gekomen.
Quintus Caecilius Metellus Nepos, Gnaius Pompeius Magnus maior en Publius Licinius Crassus kozen de zijde van Sulla.
In de slag bij de Porta Collina te Rome (82) werden zowel de Marianen als de Samnieten verslagen en daarna werden ze genadeloos vervolgd.
nl.wikipedia.org /wiki/Sulla   (779 words)

  
 Sertorius - Plutarch's Lives - translated by John Dryden and revised by Arthur Hugh Clough, Book, etext   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Quintus Sertorius was of a noble family, born in the city of Nursia, in the country of the Sabines; his father died when he was young, and he was carefully and decently educated by his mother, whose name was Rhea, and whom he appears to have extremely loved and honored.
This action made Sertorius highly renowned throughout all Spain, and as soon as he returned to Rome he was appointed quæstor of Cisalpine Gaul, at a very seasonable moment for his country, the Marsian war being on the point of breaking out.
Sertorius, meantime, showed the loftiness of his temper in calling together all the Roman senators who had fled from Rome, and had come and resided with him, and giving them the name of a senate; and out of these he chose prætors and quæstors, and adorned his government with all the Roman laws and institutions.
whitewolf.newcastle.edu.au /words/authors/P/Plutarch/prose/plutachslives/sertorius.html   (3458 words)

  
 Sertorius, Quintus - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Sertorius, Quintus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
A supporter of Marius and Cinna, after their deaths he led a resistance in Spain against the regime of Sulla.
Sertorius served under Marius and Cinna when they entered Rome, but disapproved of the ensuing massacres.
Sertorius went to Spain, and then to Mauretania, where he defeated Sulla's general Paccianus.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /Sertorius,%20Quintus   (227 words)

  
 Promagistrate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A legal innovation of the Roman Republic, the promagistracy was invented in order to provide Rome with governors of overseas territories instead of having to elect more magistrates each year.
Promagistrates were usually either proquaestors (acting in place of quaestors), propraetors, acting in place of praetors, or proconsuls acting in place of consuls.
Subsequently, when Pompeius Magnus was given proconsular imperium to fight against Quintus Sertorius, the Senate made a point of distinguishing that he was not actually being appointed a promagistrate: he was appointed to act not in place of a consul (pro consule), but on behalf of the consuls (pro consulibus).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Promagistracy   (481 words)

  
 Untitled
Sertorius decided the position of the anti-Sullan forces in Italy was hopeless, and made his way to Spain to take up his propraetorship and form an alternative power base.
Sertorius abandoned Spain and sailed over to N. Africa but after the men from his fleet were attacked and defeated while they were replenishing their water supplies, Sertorius tried to return to Spain.
Sertorius would have been quite happy to settle in the Atlantic Islands but the Cilician pirates who had been helping him sailed off to Mauretania, now Morocco, to help restore Ascalis, a local prince, to the throne.
www.suite101.com /print_article.cfm/ancient_biographies/107643   (770 words)

  
 Sertorius and Spain
A member of Cinna's opposition government in the late 80's BC, Quintus Sertorius served as a praetor in 83 BC and was active with Scipio Asiagenus and Norbanus against Sulla in the civil war.
Sertorius used his distance from Rome, as well as the turmoil that plagued the political system, to begin the concept of an alternative Republic.
Sertorius, outnumbered and outclassed, fled to Mauretania in North West Africa to avoid proscription.
www.unrv.com /roman-republic/sertorius-and-spain.php   (811 words)

  
 Quintus Sertorius: Facts and details from Encyclopedia Topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Quintus Sertorius (died 72 BC), EHandler: no quick summary.
Sertorius was in league with the pirates in the Mediterranean Mediterranean Sea quick summary:
The mediterranean sea is a part of the atlantic ocean almost completely enclosed by land, on the north by europe, on the south by africa, and on the east...
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/q/qu/quintus_sertorius.htm   (1865 words)

  
 A Sertorian Romano-Hispanic DBA Variant Army List   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Sertorius abandoned Spain for adventures as a pirate and as a general in New Carthage and Maurusia in Africa, but returned shortly thereafter with a band of 700 Libyan (Moorish) allies at the request of the Luisitani tribes of further Spain to be their ruler.
At the height of his success in Spain, Sertorius was assassinated in 72 BC by agents of Perpenna Vento, a high born Roman and prominent member of the Cinna faction in exile in Spain.
As these quotes demonstrate (and assuming they are accurate), Sertorius' success can be attributed largely to the loyalty and training of his native Spanish and transplanted Roman troops, which allowed him to adapt his tactics to the circumstances at hand.
www.fanaticus.org /dba/armies/var52a.html   (994 words)

  
 NationMaster.com - Encyclopedia: Huesca
Under the impetus of Quintus Sertorius, the renegade Roman and Iberian hero who made Osca his base, the city minted its own coinage and was the site of a prestigious school founded by Sertorius to educate young Iberians in Latin and Romanitas in general.
The fully Romanized city, with its forum in the Cathedral square was made a municipium by decree of Augustus in 30 BCE.
A municipium was the second highest class of a Roman city, and was inferior in status to the colonia.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Huesca   (1361 words)

  
 SERTORIUS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Während der Herrschaft der Popularen in Rom wurde Sertorius 83 v.
Zeitweilig wurde er von dort durch Anhänger Sullas nach Mauretanien vertrieben, konnte aber zurückkehren und für mehrere Jahre eine von Rom unabhängige Herrschaft in Spanien aufbauen, die er zunächst erfolgreich verteidigte.
Allmählich aber konnten sich aus Rom entsandte Feldherren, vor allem Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus, gegen Sertorius durchsetzen, in dessen Lager es zu zunehmenden Spannungen kam, in deren Folge Sertorius von Marcus Perperna ermordet wurde.
www.toonorama.com /encyclopedia/S/Sertorius   (154 words)

  
 Quintus sertorius - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Start the Quintus sertorius article or add a request for it.
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www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/quintus_sertorius   (135 words)

  
 Sertorius, Quintus. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
He was a general under Marius but did not take part in Marius’; proscriptions.
Sertorius was appointed governor of Farther Spain in 83
B.C. but fled to Africa to escape the reprisals of Sulla.
www.bartleby.com /65/se/Sertoriu.html   (165 words)

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