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Topic: Ray Kurzweil


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In the News (Wed 24 Jul 19)

  
  The age of Ray Kurzweil - The Boston Globe
Ray Kurzweil, the company's founder, is an inventor, and has been one for as long as he can remember.
Kurzweil is compact and trim, with full cheeks, a small smile, and a knot-like nose drooping toward a broad chin.
For Kurzweil, however, the explosive power of exponential growth goes far beyond transistors: Human technological advancement, the billions of years of terrestrial evolution, the entire history of the universe, all, he argues, follow the law of accelerating returns.
www.boston.com /news/globe/ideas/articles/2005/09/25/the_age_of_ray_kurzweil   (2144 words)

  
 Ray Kurzweil Aims to Live Forever | LiveScience
Kurzweil says his critics often fail to appreciate the exponential nature of technological advance, with knowledge doubling year by year so that amazing progress eventually occurs in short periods.
Kurzweil's grandfather and father suffered from heart disease, his father dying when Kurzweil was 22.
Kurzweil writes that humanity is on the verge of controlling how genes express themselves and ultimately changing the genes.
www.livescience.com /health/ap_Kurzweil_050213.html   (1319 words)

  
  RedOrbit - Technology - Inventor Kurzweil Aiming to Live Forever   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Kurzweil writes of millions of blood cell-sized robots, which he calls "nanobots," that will keep us forever young by swarming through the body, repairing bones, muscles, arteries and brain cells.
Kurzweil says his critics often fail to appreciate the exponential nature of technological advance, with knowledge doubling year by year so that amazing progress eventually occurs in short periods.
Kurzweil writes that humanity is on the verge of controlling how genes express themselves and ultimately changing the genes.
www.redorbit.com /news/display/?id=127158   (1182 words)

  
 Oren Sreebny's Weblog: [educause06] Ray Kurzweil
Ray Kurzweil is talking about being able to predict the advance of information technology.
Ray goes on to talk about the extent to which artificial intelligence programs are providing generally useful functions now, and the narrowness of these applications are getting less narrow over time.
Ray shows a video of a prototype of a translating telephone, where he speaks in English and the person on the other end hears him in German, and vice versa (also in French).
staff.washington.edu /oren/weblog2/archives/2006/10/educause06_ray.html   (869 words)

  
 A ‘Singular’ Man, Ray Kurzweil Aims for Human Omnipotence - The Tech
Ray Kurzweil ’70, the company’s founder, is an inventor, and has been one for as long as he can remember.
Kurzweil is compact and trim, with full cheeks, a small smile, and a knot-like nose drooping toward a broad chin.
For Kurzweil, however, the explosive power of exponential growth goes far beyond transistors: Human technological advancement, the billions of years of terrestrial evolution, the entire history of the universe, all, he argues, follow the law of accelerating returns.
www-tech.mit.edu /V125/N42/kurzweil.html   (1303 words)

  
 Raymond Kurzweil - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Raymond Kurzweil (pronounced: [kɚz-waɪl]) (born February 12, 1948) is a pioneer in the fields of optical character recognition (OCR), text-to-speech synthesis, speech recognition technology, and electronic keyboard instruments.
Kurzweil was inducted in 2002 into the National Inventors Hall of Fame, established by the United States Patent and Trademark Office.
Kurzweil is also an enthusiastic advocate of using technology to achieve immortality.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ray_Kurzweil   (1491 words)

  
 Who Made America? | Innovators | Ray Kurzweil
Kurzweil's K250 synthesizer, the world's first keyboard-input computer instrument, debuted in 1984 and generated the sounds of various acoustic instruments.
Kurzweil sold his synthesizer company in 1990, the same year his influential book, The Age of Intelligent Machines, was published.
Kurzweil, who has received dozens of awards and honorary degrees, continues to innovate and theorize about artificial intelligence (A.I.) at his Massachusetts lab.
www.pbs.org /wgbh/theymadeamerica/whomade/kurzweil_lo.html   (465 words)

  
 Ray Kurzweil on The Paula Gordon Show
Kurzweil is optimistic in the face of what he expects will be dramatic, exciting (and to others disturbing) paths ahead.
Kurzweil also believes that ultimately, we will accept machines as conscious entities, as much as we accept that other humans are conscious.
Ray Kurzweil gives Paula Gordon and Bill Russell a series of examples of how change is accelerating.
www.paulagordon.com /shows/kurzweil/index.html   (1155 words)

  
 Biography of Ray Kurzweil
Ray, along with leaders of the National Federation of the Blind, announced the Kurzweil Reading Machine at a press conference on January 13, 1976, which was covered by all of the networks and leading print publications.
Ray's latest ventures include FAT KAT (Financial Accelerating Transactions - Kurzweil Adaptive Technologies), which is applying evolutionary algorithms to stock market decisions with the goal of creating an artificially intelligent financial analyst.
Ray Kurzweil received the $500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize (view the video), the nation's largest award in invention and innovation, and was inducted in 2002 into the National Inventor Hall of Fame.
www.kurzweiltech.com /raybio.html   (1553 words)

  
 TEDMED3   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Ray Kurzweil is an inventor, entrepreneur, author and futurist.
Kurzweil has successfully founded and developed nine companies in OCR, music synthesis, speech recognition, reading technology, virtual reality, financial investment, medical simulation, and cybernetic art.
Ray Kurzweil received Lemelson-MIT Prize, the nation’s largest in invention and innovation, and in 2002 was inducted into the National Inventor Hall of Fame.
www.tedmed.com /kurzweil.html   (128 words)

  
 In Search of the Sixth Sense
Kurzweil: A lot of people say you can’t really tell the future, and there are certain things that are hard to predict.
Kurzweil: One of the ways in which our biological intelligence is limited is that we have only limited ways of hooking up our intelligence to others.
Kurzweil: Increasingly that’s in the entrepreneurial field, where to actually achieve something of value, you have to be able to combine different fields.
www.fastcompany.com /articles/2005/03/kurzweil.html   (5198 words)

  
 Online NewsHour: Spiritual Machines -- September 13, 1999
RAY KURZWEIL: Well, in 1976 we introduced the Kurzweil reading machine, which was the first machine that could read books out loud so blind people could read books and magazines.
RAY KURZWEIL: Well, within 30 years we'll see the emergence of machines, non-biological intelligence, that equals and ultimately exceeds human intelligence.
RAY KURZWEIL: Our emotional ability, our ability to recognize emotion, to respond to it appropriately, even our spirituality, is not something that's so stuck on to human intelligence as an after thought.
www.pbs.org /newshour/gergen/september99/gergen_9-13.html   (1564 words)

  
 Ray Kurzweil Honored
The Kurzweil 250, introduced in 1984, was able to fool concert pianists in an A‑B oblindo comparison as to whether they were hearing a grand piano or the Kurzweil invention.
The technology Kurzweil created allowed musicians for the first time to play the sounds of any acoustic instrument, to play them polyphonically (i.e., multiple notes at a time), and to apply the full range of computer control techniques such as sequencing, layering, and sound modification to the rich sounds of acoustic instruments.
A combination of Kurzweil's speech-recognition technology with a Kurzweil‑developed medical expert system and knowledge base is also widely used by physicians to create medical reports.
www.nfb.org /Images/nfb/Publications/bm/bm00/bm0003/bm000311.htm   (943 words)

  
 Amazon.de: The Singularity Is Near: English Books: Ray Kurzweil   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Kurzweil's argument is necessarily twofold: it's not enough to argue that there are virtually no constraints on our capacity; he must also convince readers that such developments are desirable.
But Kurzweil is a true scientist—a large-minded one at that—and gives due space both to "the panoply of existential risks" as he sees them and the many presumed lines of attack others might bring to bear.
What's arresting isn't the degree to which Kurzweil's heady and bracing vision fails to convince—given the scope of his projections, that's inevitable—but the degree to which it seems downright plausible.
www.amazon.de /Singularity-Near-Ray-Kurzweil/dp/0670033847   (746 words)

  
 bookofjoe: Ray Kurzweil believes he is immortal
Ray Kurzweil is an accomplished inventor, but he is best known for his wild prognostications about the future.
Mr Kurzweil walked on to the stage, played a classical piano piece for the celebrity panel and then shared his secret with the host and audience: the piece he had just played was written by a computer, and he had programmed the computer that created it.
Then came Kurzweil Music Systems, the result of a collaboration with Stevie Wonder, a blind musician who was the first private customer to buy one of his reading machines.
www.bookofjoe.com /2005/04/ray_kurzweil_be.html   (1886 words)

  
 Singularity Summit - Speakers - Ray Kurzweil
Ray Kurzweil has been described as “the restless genius” by the Wall Street Journal, Inc Magazine called him the “rightful heir to Thomas Edison,” and PBS included him as one of 16 “revolutionaries who made America,” along with other inventors of the past two centuries.
Kurzweil has successfully founded and developed nine businesses in OCR, music synthesis, speech recognition, reading technology, virtual reality, financial investment, cybernetic art, and other areas of artificial intelligence.
Kurzweil has also received dozens of other national and international awards, including the 1994 Dickson Prize (Carnegie Mellon University's top science prize), Engineer of the Year from Design News, Inventor of the Year from MIT, and the Grace Murray Hopper Award from the Association for Computing Machinery.
sss.stanford.edu /speakers/kurzweil   (452 words)

  
 Lifeboat Foundation Guardian Award 2005: Ray Kurzweil
Ray Kurzweil was the principal developer of the first omni-font optical character recognition, the first print-to-speech reading machine for the blind, the first text-to-speech synthesizer, and the first commercially marketed large-vocabulary speech recognition.
Ray Kurzweil had grown increasingly worried about bioterrorism and now advocates a one hundred billion dollar program to accelerate the development of technologies to combat biological viruses.
Ray Kurzweil goes on to state "the means and knowledge will soon exist in a routine college bioengineering lab (and already exists in more sophisticated labs) to create unfriendly pathogens more dangerous than nuclear weapons."
lifeboat.com /ex/guardian2005   (430 words)

  
 NanoVentures2002: Ray Kurzweil
Kurzweil's most recent national best-selling book, "The Age of Spiritual Machines," has received widespread acclaim, achieved the #1 status on Amazon in the categories of both science and artificial intelligence, and has been published in 9 languages.
Kurzweil's writings are for anyone who wonders where human technology is going next." Wired magazine writes, "Ray Kurzweil has a knack for spotting the next new thing.
Kurzweil is widely regarded as one of the leading inventors of our time.
www1.zyvex.com /nanoventures/BiosRayK.html   (557 words)

  
 Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI)
Kurzweil will discuss his ideas on the future interplay between mankind and artificial intelligence with WPI's graduates and community in his speech, "When Humans Transcend Biology." After Kurzweil's talk, the university will confer upon him an honorary degree.
Widely regarded as one of the preeminent inventors and innovators of our time, Kurzweil foresees an era when the human body will be enhanced by software and computers, enabling humans to download intelligence and to live long past the current life expectancy.
With this project, Kurzweil won first prize in the International Science Fair, and he was named one of the 40 Westinghouse Science Talent Search winners who were able to meet President Lyndon Johnson in a White House ceremony.
www.wpi.edu /News/Releases/20045/kurzweil.html   (500 words)

  
 About Ray Kurzweil
Ray Kurzweil was the principal developer of the first omni-font optical character recognition, the first print-to-speech reading machine for the blind, the first CCD flat-bed scanner, the first text-to-speech synthesizer, the first music synthesizer capable of recreating the grand piano and other orchestral instruments, and the first commercially marketed large-vocabulary speech recognition.
Ray has successfully founded and developed nine businesses in OCR, music synthesis, speech recognition, reading technology, virtual reality, financial investment, cybernetic art, and other areas of artificial intelligence.
Ray Kurzweil was inducted in 2002 into the National Inventors Hall of Fame, established by the U.S. Patent Office.
www.kurzweiltech.com /aboutray.html   (299 words)

  
 Gizmodo, the Gadget Guide
Inventor/Author Ray Kurzweil speaks in San Francisco about his 652-page book that predicts humans will eventually use their mastery of computers, software, gene-splicing techniques and nanotechnology to evolve into powerful, immortal, Borg-like beings.
Ray Kurzweil is a thinker, an inventor, and a Matrix fan.
Kurzweil could just be a cyborg as he's quoted of taking over 200 supplements a day to alter his body's chemistry.
www.gizmodo.com /gadgets/ray-kurzweil   (265 words)

  
 Kurzweil Educational Systems
Kurzweil Educational Systems’ research-aligned technologies provide complete reading, writing, and study solutions to help all students overcome learning challenges and succeed academically.
Kurzweil 3000 is a scaffolded reading, writing, and study skills solution for struggling learners, including ELL students and students with special needs.
Kurzweil 3000 for Macintosh Version 4 was recently announced and has exciting new features from Read the Web to creating your own audio files to send to your iTunes® playlist for effortless transfer to your iPod®.
www.kurzweiledu.com   (206 words)

  
 Ubiquity Interviews Ray Kurzweil : SF Indymedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
KURZWEIL: There are two key aspects to the concept of singularity—the hardware and software sides of emulating human intelligence.
KURZWEIL: It might be some mathematical problem or some practical issue for an invention or even a business strategy question or an interpersonal problem.
KURZWEIL: Well, yes and no. Computers, right now, are actually collaborating with people, and very few musicians will create music today without collaborating with machines that are doing sound enhancement, sequencing, mixing intelligent signal processing and so on.
sf.indymedia.org /news/2006/01/1724154.php   (5309 words)

  
 Amazon.ca: Age Of Spiritual Machines: Books: Ray Kurzweil   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Kurzweil, artificial intelligence expert and author of The Age of Intelligent Machines, shows that technological evolution moves at an exponential pace.
If Kurzweil has it right, in the next few decades humans will download books directly into their brains, run off with virtual secretaries and exist "as software," as we become more like computers and computers become more like us.
Ray Kurzweil's Age of Spiritual Machines is an enthralling look at the future of computers and technology.
www.amazon.ca /Age-Spiritual-Machines-Ray-Kurzweil/dp/0140282025   (1519 words)

  
 The Man and the Machine: An Interview with Ray Kurzweil - AccessWorld® - September 2004   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
As examples, Kurzweil cited the telephone, "which Alexander Graham Bell originally conceived as an aid for people who were deaf," and, of course, Talking Books, which found mainstream favor first as 33 1/3 RPM long-playing recordings of music and the spoken word, and, much later, as audio books.
Kurzweil is now working with NFB to develop a handheld scanning device that will use a digital camera and a portable computer and will perform two-dimensional scanning.
Kurzweil said that the goal of work in the disabilities field is to prevent blindness from becoming a handicap.
www.afb.org /afbpress/pub.asp?DocID=aw050505   (1108 words)

  
 TED | Talks | Ray Kurzweil: How technology's accelerating power will transform us (video)
Ray Kurzweil is an engineer who has radically advanced the fields of speech, text, and audio...
Ray Kurzweil is not some crackpot futurist, if you look at his background he's one of the most accomplished people of our time.
Ray, for me, is the main man. His clarity of foresight and insight into technological innovation, and its accelerating pace is unmatched.
www.ted.com /index.php/talks/view/id/38   (1075 words)

  
 Long Now Discuss > View topic - 02005-09-23 > Ray Kurzweil   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Attempts to think long term, Ray Kurzweil began, keep making the mistake of imagining that the pace of the future is like the pace of the past.
Kurzweil noted that among "singularitarians" he is known as somewhat conservative, expecting a "soft takeoff" instead of hard takeoff.
In the Q and A he dealt with the usual "but what about limitations of resources?" questions with predictions that nanotech would increase efficiencies and make materials so fungible that what are seen now as severe limitations will fall away.
discuss.longnow.org /viewtopic.php?t=37   (1038 words)

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