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Topic: Redundant array of independent disks


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In the News (Sun 23 Sep 18)

  
  Redundant array of independent disks - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In 1988, RAID levels 1 through 5 were formally defined by David A. Patterson, Garth A. Gibson and Randy H. Katz in the paper, "A Case for Redundant Arrays of Inexpensive Disks (RAID)".
In this sense, concatenation is akin to the reverse of partitioning.
Likewise, should a disk fail in the array, the parity blocks from the surviving disks are combined mathematically with the data blocks from the surviving disks to reconstruct the data on the failed drive "on the fly".
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Redundant_array_of_independent_disks   (6763 words)

  
 RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
The idea of RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) was first introduced by David A. Patterson, Garth Gibson and Randy H. Katz at the University California at Berkeley in 1988.
RAID is a purpose of storing the same data in different places on multiple hard disks and improves storage subsystem performance.
The disk array data capacity is equal to the number of members times the smallest member capacity.
usa.aopen.com /tech/techinside/RAID.htm   (657 words)

  
 RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks)
Array capacity is equal to the capacity of one member disk.
Array capacity is equal to the capacity of member disks, minus capacity of one member disk.
RAID level 1 is at a high cost because you write the same information to all of the disks in the array, which wastes drive space.
www.redhat.com /docs/manuals/linux/RHL-6.2-Manual/ref-guide/ch-raid.html   (1452 words)

  
 RAID - Free Computer Science Tutorials - Provided by Laynetworks.com - Lay Networks
If you had a level 0 RAID array set up with 4 disks, data could be pulled from the single virtual disk it creates at up to 4 times the speed of a single disk of the same size.
For example, in a 3 drive level 0 RAID array, block A would be saved to drive A, block B to drive B, block C to drive C, block D to drive A, and so on until all of the data was written to a drive.
The only problem that level 4 RAID arrays have is that there is a bottleneck when writing data since the parity drive does not benefit from the performance enhancement of data striping.
www.laynetworks.com /RAID-Tutorial.htm   (1112 words)

  
 What is RAID by RaidWeb   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) is an acronym first used in a 1988.
RAID boxes provide the user a way to access multiple individual hard disks as if they were one larger disk, spreading data access out over the multiple disks, which reduces the risk of losing all data if one drive fails.
RAID 0: Also known as "Disk Striping", this is technically not a RAID level since it provides no fault tolerance.
www.raidweb.com /whatis.html   (589 words)

  
 RAID: Redundant Array of [Independent|Inexpensive] Disks at Matt Croydon::Postneo 2.0   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
RAID 0 is not part of the original specification [3] and provides absolutely no redundancy; however it does employ data striping.
RAID 5 is the most commonly deployed configuration [7] in commercial settings and distributes the parity blocks evenly across all disks [2].
In RAID 0+1, one disk failure brings down the mirror half of the array until the bad disk is replaced [7].
www.postneo.com /2005/06/03/raid-redundant-array-of-independent-disks-paper   (2334 words)

  
 Redundant Array of Independent Disks (RAID)
The basic idea behind RAID is to combine multiple small, inexpensive disk drives into an array of disk drives which yields performance exceeding that of one large and expensive drive.
Fundamental to RAID is "striping," a method of combining the space on multiple hard drives into a single logical drive for the operating system.
That means the data being written to the array is broken down into strips and striped across the member disks of the array.
www.obsolyte.com /docs/rhl-rg-6.1en/ch-raid.html   (844 words)

  
 Redundant array of independent disks - TheBestLinks.com - RAID, Array, Advanced Technology Attachment, Bit, ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
RAID 0 was not one of the original RAID levels.
the array fails more often) than that of a single disk (since there are more disks that can fail, despite the added redundancy), but as one can often replace a disk before the second one fails, it is usually more difficult to lose data.
It is not as robust as RAID 1+0 and cannot tolerate two simultaneous disk failures, if not from the same stripe.
www.thebestlinks.com /RAID.html   (3187 words)

  
 Redundant Array of Independent Disks (RAID)
The basic idea behind RAID is to combine multiple small, inexpensive disk drives into an array to accomplish performance or redundancy goals not attainable with one large and expensive drive.
This array of drives appears to the computer as a single logical storage unit or drive.
RAID is a method in which information is spread across several disks.
www.redhat.com /docs/manuals/enterprise/RHEL-4-Manual/sysadmin-guide/ch-raid-intro.html   (196 words)

  
 RAID - Redundant Array of Independent Disks
Implemented as a mirrored array whose segments are RAID 0 arrays.
RAID 10 (RAID Nirroring and Striping) - a striped configuration with RAID 1 segments whose segments are RAID 1 arrays.
RAID 0 implements a striped disk array, the data is broken down into blocks and each block is written to a separate disk drive
www.infocellar.com /hardware/raid.htm   (2321 words)

  
 Define RAID - a definition from Whatis.com - see also: redundant array of inexpensive disks, rendundant array of ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
RAID (redundant array of independent disks; originally redundant array of inexpensive disks) is a way of storing the same data in different places (thus, redundantly) on multiple hard disks.
RAID employs the technique of disk striping, which involves partitioning each drive's storage space into units ranging from a sector (512 bytes) up to several megabytes.
It appears to be similar to RAID-5 with some performance enhancements as well as the enhancements that come from having a high-speed disk cache on the disk array.
searchstorage.techtarget.com /sDefinition/0,,sid5_gci214332,00.html   (846 words)

  
 RAID definition - Small Business Computing Online Dictionary of IT Terms: Powered by Webopedia
(rād) Short for Redundant Array of Independent (or Inexpensive) Disks, a category of disk drives that employ two or more drives in combination for fault tolerance and performance.
RAID disk drives are used frequently on servers but aren't generally necessary for personal computers.
If a data disk fails, the parity data is used to create a replacement disk.
sbc.webopedia.com /TERM/R/RAID.html   (534 words)

  
 Redundant Array of Independent Disks - Whitepaper on RAID, from Kintronics - Business White Papers, Webcasts and Case ...
Overview: RAID (Redundant Array of Inexpensive or Independent Disks) is an important component for servers on a critical enterprise or workgroup network.
RAID technology makes data more accessible by preventing downtime due to a hardware failure.
RAID systems can sustain several bad sectors and even whole disk failures, continue running, and all the while being transparent to the end-user.
jobfunctions.bnet.com /whitepaper.aspx?kw=RAID&docid=335   (334 words)

  
 RAID (redundant array of independent disks)
RAID uses a collection of disks of the same type to provide data protection, spreading data across the disks in such a way as to maximize the recoverability of the data if there is a single disk failure.
In effect, the RAID controller aggregates the disks and presents a single disk image to host operating systems so that applications never have to know where or how the data are being placed on the storage media.
A RAID subsystem is an example of aggregation combined with virtualization.
www.networkworld.com /details/728.html   (798 words)

  
 RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) - a CompInfo Directory
RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) - Outline
The basics of RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) together with a glossary
RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) - White Papers
www.compinfo-center.com /stor/raid.htm   (538 words)

  
 Clouten: Sharing Expertise and Resources
Hard disk drives in computers have developed rapidly in their storage capacity.
A RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) array might handle 300 GB of stored information.
It is likely that more often those resources will include the full-text of books and periodicals that we will never own, but which are stored somewhere out there in cyberspace--it could be anywhere on the face of the earth--that we access from a computer workstation or terminal in our library.
www.asdal.org /minutes/share.html   (3541 words)

  
 Redundant array of independent disks - Wikimedia Commons
Redundant array of independent disks - Wikimedia Commons
In computing, a redundant array of inexpensive disks (more commonly known as a RAID) is a system of using multiple hard drives for sharing or replicating data among the drives.
This page was last modified 19:27, 23 February 2006.
commons.wikimedia.org /wiki/Redundant_array_of_independent_disks   (81 words)

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