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Topic: Religion in China


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  Religion in China undergoing massive change, says new journal editor | Ekklesia
The growth of Christianity among intellectuals has fundamentally “reshaped the religious landscape in China”, says a leading Chinese academic and Editor of what is being described as the “most authoritative” journal on religion in the People’s Republic of China.
The China Study Journal is an initiative of the Churches Together in Britain and Ireland China Desk, headed up by Caroline Fielder, which cooperates with the Department of Theology at University of Birmingham.
The publication has its roots in a research project begun in the 1970s at the height of the Cultural Revolution, a period when China was cut off from the outside world, when churches and other religious organizations in China were forbidden, and when religious persecution was rife.
www.ekklesia.co.uk /node/4931   (667 words)

  
 Religion in China   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
The first Jesuit attempt to reach China was made 1552 by Francis Xavier but he died the same year the Chinese island of Shangchuan without having reached the mainland.
The People's Republic of China was established in 1949 and for much of its early maintained a hostile attitude toward religion which seen as emblematic of feudalism and foreign colonialism.
In practice the Communist Party of China will react harshly against groups such Falun Gong which it perceives as challenging its while in general ignoring groups that are seen as challenging the state.
www.freeglossary.com /Religion_in_China   (1308 words)

  
 Religion in China - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
The study of religion in China is complicated by several factors.
The China Inland Mission was the largest mission agency in China and it is estimated that Taylor was responsible for more people being converted to Christianity than at any other time since Paul the Apostle brought Christian teaching to Europe.
During the Cultural Revolution, religion was condemned as feudalistic and thousands of religious buildings were looted and destroyed.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Religion_in_China   (2545 words)

  
 Religion in China   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
China had its own problems, they admitted, but at least in China you didn't have to worry about having your child abducted from a shopping mall.
China thirsts after foreign capital, which it badly needs to fuel its modernization (to which everything is subordinated) and, until the recent atrocities in Beijing, the central government has exhibited some surprising (though generally superficial) leniency in order to stimulate increased tourism and foreign investment.
Christianity is the "Foreigners' Religion." Buddhism is generally regarded as the superstition of the peasants and the uneducated workers, and is a vestige of "feudal society." The Party holds that much work remains to be done to fully educate these people and liberate them from the bondage of the fanciful and absurd.
www.libertyhaven.com /countriesandregions/china/religion.html   (3090 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Father Cervellera: China is going through one of the greatest political and social transitions of its history: from being an ultra-Communist country, it is becoming a country of unbridled capitalism.
Religion could become the motor of a harmonious development of the most populous country of the planet.
Today China is governed by a corrupt, unscrupulous ruling class which has abandoned Communism at the economic level, but which continues to maintain the same control of the population.
www.hrwf.net /html/china_2003.html   (7657 words)

  
 [No title]
China's ultraleftist leaders during that period, bent on eliminating religion, prohibited all public religious activities and incarcerated thousands of clergy and laypeople from the five officially recognized religions: Buddhism, Daoism, Islam, and Protestant and Catholic Christianity.
China has both a state religion and a bureaucracy for government supervision of religion: Marxism is the surrogate religion, and the Religious Affairs Bureau, which is accountable to the Communist Party's United Front Work Department, oversees religious activities.
Of particular interest is the author's explication of the pluralization of religions, which he breaks into three subtopics: the emergence of new sects; the emergence of splinter groups dissociating themselves from the leadership of regular religious organizations; and the emergence of "underground" religious groups.
www.currenthistory.com /archivesep96/mcinnis.html   (3037 words)

  
 CBBC - China Guide - Religion in China   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
The Chinese Communist Party - the ruling party in China - for a long time discouraged the practice of religion, officially because it was atheist but in reality because it believed religion was a dangerous alternative credo to communism.
China still has some mosques which date as far back as the Tang Dynasty, and which remain active in cities as far apart as Xi'an, Hohhot, Guangzhou, Quanzhou in Fujian, Hangzhou, and Beijing.
China was visited by Nestorian Christians as early as the 7th century.
www.cbbc.org /china_guide/religion.html   (734 words)

  
 East Asian Documents:The Present Conditions of Religion in China
In China, all religions have equal status and coexist in tranquility.
We think that in the new century, the religions in China are facing three major challenges: First, the rapid growth in the number of believers in China; second, the rapid change of the Chinese society; third, the religious exchanges with the rest of the world.
At present, the various religions in China are devoting themselves to the construction of their religious theology and the purification of their beliefs to resist the corrosive influence of heresies.
www.isop.ucla.edu /eas/documents/religion-chn.htm   (2220 words)

  
 Religion and Philosophy in China (Freedom of Religion)
China is a country with great diversity of religions, with over 100 million followers of various faiths.
Christianity reached China several times after the seventh century, and was introduced to the country on a large scale after the Opium War of 1840.
In China, religion is separated from political power and from education too.
www.asianinfo.org /asianinfo/china/religion.htm   (948 words)

  
 Chinese Religions
Yet the various folk traditions in the religion of the rural masses have a comparable preoccupation with this worldly concerns, expressed in earthbound beliefs in the gods of the family and the soil.
It first entered China in the second century AD and by the Tang dynasty was the most dynamic and influential of all religions.
If this religion is bound to this earth then this may be because it has recognised the impoverishment of both the mechanistic materialist and the idealist understandings of reality.
sacu.org /religion.html   (1947 words)

  
 Philosophy and Religion in China
Memorized by scholars f or generations in China, these books and four other works, including the `Analects', a compilation of Confucian teachings, were the subjects of civil service examinations for over 2,000 years.
The prevailing disorders, aggravated by barbarian invasions and the flight of northern Chinese to the south, heightened the attraction of Buddhism with its promise of personal salvation, despite its lack of affinity with the society-oriented thought of the Chinese.
Ch'an flourished in China during the T'ang and Sung dynasties (960-1279), and its influences were strongly felt in literature and painting.
miyeonjan.tripod.com /chinreli.html/t00014173   (2860 words)

  
 EastSouthWestNorth: Religion in China - Part 4
The grassroots party and government organizations are asked to set up working organizations to stop the evil cults, to pay high attention to the importance of dealing with the evil cults and to include this work as routine part of the overall administration of construction and public security by the grassroots party and government organizations.
Violence Taints Religion's Solace for China's Poor which claimed that the economic development in rural China has been slow so that the peasants who account for 2/3 of the population in China are still leading poor and backwards lives.
According to a researcher of religion in China who wishes to remain anonymous, emptiness and yearning in the closed rural society forced the religious churches to go underground, and form a breeding ground as fertile for the wheat and the barley.
www.zonaeuropa.com /20060503_2.htm   (1569 words)

  
 China Guide - China Culture   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
China is the most populous country in the world, containing about one-fifth of the world's total population.
Many different ethnic groups, languages and religions exist throughout the country.
The rich culture of China is seen throughout the world.
www.chinaguide.org /guide/china-culture   (50 words)

  
 Open Court: State and Religion in China
He argues, against those who claim that Chinese politics has been traditionally secular, or even that the Chinese traditionally had no religion, that religion has deep roots in the Chinese past, and that the Chinese state has from its creation always interfered in religious matters.
Professor Yu criticizes the common western view that ancestor worship was merely an exaggerated form of respect for the departed, and shows that it was a genuine manifestation of religion devotion.
With its highly specific concept of "normal religion," the present Chinese government is "using religion to police and regulate religion," just as Chinese governments have done for millennia.
www.opencourtbooks.com /books_n/state_and_religion.htm   (383 words)

  
 Religion In China
The international religious freedom report says about China: "Unregistered religious groups continued to experience varying degrees of official interference and harassment.
Despite the Chinese government's efforts to restrict religious expression, the number of religious adherents – of all faiths – continues to grow in China.
In China, and elsewhere, says Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, "The United States seeks to promote religious freedom and tolerance and build a more peaceful world for all faiths."
www.voanews.com /uspolicy/2006-09-20-voa2.cfm   (342 words)

  
 Popular Religion in China
The main textual traditions associated with Chinese civilisation are those of Buddhism, Daoism and the ancestral calendrical rituals written by court officials and centrally approved scholars: a tradition associated with Confucianism.
In this seminar Stephan Feuchtwang, senior research fellow in Anthropology at the London School of Economics and Political Science, examines popular religion in China from the importance of textual traditions to the elaborate and spectacular rituals, festivals and temples.
In Session 1 he explores the many forms of religion in China, going on to investigate, in Session 2, the establishment of orthodoxy and Chinese imperial rule through compiling canons and teachings.
www.fathom.com /course/21701773/index.html   (431 words)

  
 Digital Resources in Daoist Studies
Written for the Conference on "Religions in Chinese Script: Perspectives for Textual Research", Kyoto, November 18-21, 2004 (Memorial Symposium for the 75th Anniversary of the Institute for Research in Humanities, Kyoto University).
In China (both Mainland and Taiwan), on the other hand, many websites concerning Daoism are the expression of temples or other local realities, including tourist attractions.
An extensive bibliography of Chinese studies on Daoism and Chinese religion is found in the Daojiao wenhua website (www.daoist.org).
www.stanford.edu /group/scbs/ARC/china/projects/digital_resources.html   (3453 words)

  
 Chinese Cultural Studies: Philosophy and Religion in China
Memorized by scholars for generations in China, these books and four other works, including the `Analects', a compilation of Confucian teachings, were the subjects of civil service examinations for over 2,000 years.
The prevailing disorders, aggravated by barbarian invasions and the flight of northern Chinese to the south, heightened the attraction of Buddhism with its promise of personal salvation, despite its lack of affinity with the society-oriented thought of the Chinese.
Ch'an flourished in China during the T'ang and Sung dynasties (960-1279), and its influences were strongly felt in literature and painting.
acc6.its.brooklyn.cuny.edu /~phalsall/texts/chinrelg.html   (2886 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Religion in China Today (The China Quarterly Special Issues): Books: Daniel L. Overmyer   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Religion in Chinese Society: A Study of Contemporary Social Functions of Religion and Some of Their Historical Factors by Ching Kun Yang
In the last 20 years religious traditions in many parts of China have revived their activities and organizations and rebuilt their temples, mosques and churches, despite decades of strict regulation and repression by the government.
Religion in Chinese Society: A Study of Contemporary Social Functions of Religion and Some of Their Historical Factors by Ching Kun Yang on page 11, page 37, and page 56
www.amazon.com /Religion-China-Quarterly-Special-Issues/dp/0521538238   (1155 words)

  
 Amazon.com: State and Religion in China: Books: Anthony C. Yu   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-23)
Religion in China Today (The China Quarterly Special Issues) by Daniel L. Overmyer
Religions of China in Practice by Donald S. Lopez Jr.
Anthony Yu's State and Religion in China presents ample evidence that religion has long been deeply ingrained in Chinese culture and that the state has always interfered in religious matters.
www.amazon.com /State-Religion-China-Anthony-Yu/dp/0812695526   (810 words)

  
 TEACHING RELIGION IN CHINA
My contract as a teacher in China is not unlike one in America in that it prohibits me from espousing religious views from the classroom.
One faction, citing the fact that most wars and hostilities in the world today seemed to involve religion felt it was important to know why and how a belief in a benevolent creative force could cause so much hatred.
China politics ReligionTeaching in China ESL asia cartoons humor World eligion Muslims Hindus Chinese Proverbs The Pope
www.bloggernews.net /2006/01/teaching-religion-in-china.html   (718 words)

  
 China Hongkong Hotel,Hotels in China Hong Kong,China Hong Kong vacation,Attractions in Hong Kong
China Hongkong Hotel,Hotels in China Hong Kong,China Hong Kong vacation,Attractions in Hong Kong
With its picturesque landscapes, the rich history manifested in its century old ruins of the various cities and its very warm and welcoming people, China is the place to be.
However, a trip to China will be incomplete without a visit to the Pearl of the Orient, which we know as Hong Kong.
www.chinaandhongkong.com   (184 words)

  
 History of Christianity in China
The evolution of religions in China, however, being influenced by Ancestor Worship, Taoism and Confucianism was quite complicated.
Since Buddhism in China is well addressed and documented on the internet, it is our intention to focus on another religion in China, namely, Christianity.
Christianity was introduced into China as early as the 5th century.
www.yutopian.com /religion   (247 words)

  
 China Religion Tour - Religion Tour
Religion Tour of China is a platform to introduce Natural Landscapes and Cultural Landscapes about Taoism and Buddhism in China for tourism lovers.
During the third century B.C., Emperor Asoka sent missionaries to the northwest of India, that is, present-day Pakistan and Afghanistan.
In the numerous temples of China, the unsettled temple of Hengshan Mountain in Shanxi deserves to be called the wonderfu...
www.china-tourism.net   (433 words)

  
 China religion
The man who first introduced them in China is described as a person with a terrifying, intimidating appearance, whom no one could resist in arguments [89].
Students, inspired by the “great helmsman” of China Mao Tse-tung, were destroying spiritual centers, burning books and icons, and killing all who were not demonstrating admiration of what they were doing.
Today China has recovered from the consequences of the “cultural revolution” and is confidently developing its economy, raising the level of its people’s welfare.
www.religiousbook.net /Books/Online_books/Sh/Heart_16.html   (1027 words)

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