Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Republic of Ireland Act, 1948


Related Topics
GMT

In the News (Tue 16 Jul 19)

  
  Éire
Since 1949, the term Republic of Ireland has generally been used in preference to Éire, to clarify that the country rather than the whole island is under discussion.
The repeal of the latter Act by the Republic of Ireland Act, 1948 created the Republic of Ireland in 1949, hence the appearance of the new title in public usage.
In 1948 John A. Costello, Taoiseach of a Fine Gael party dominated coalition government formed after the 1948 general election, formally declared the Republic of Ireland.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ei/Eire.html   (416 words)

  
 Republic of Ireland at AllExperts
Ireland is the fastest growing country in Europe, with a population increase of 8.1% between 2002 and 2006, or 2.25% annually.
The name Republic of Ireland came into use after the Republic of Ireland Act defined it as the official description of the state in 1949 (the purpose of the act being to declare that the state was a republic rather than a form of constitutional monarchy).
On 21 December 1948 the Republic of Ireland Act declared a republic, with the functions previously given to the King given instead to the President of Ireland.
en.allexperts.com /e/r/re/republic_of_ireland.htm   (4519 words)

  
 Ireland
The Island of Ireland is a large island in Europe.
Northern Ireland, capital - Belfast, also referred to as the 'Six Counties' or 'Ulster' (the latter name is slightly confusing for outsiders as it is also the name of the historic province of Ulster which encompasses 3 counties in the Republic and 6 counties in Northern Ireland).
The major religions, the Roman Catholic Church, the Church of Ireland and the Presbyterian Church in Ireland[?], are organised on an all-island basis.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ir/Ireland.html   (728 words)

  
 Ireland, Republic of
The Ireland Act 1949 (of the UK Parliament) subsequently recognized the secession of the Republic of Ireland from dominion status, and confirmed citizens of the Republic in the rights that they had hitherto enjoyed in the UK.
However the Republic took part in the Sunningdale Conference in 1973 on the future of Ireland and, as the violence became more acute and predictably spread into the South, strenuous efforts were made against the IRA by the government of the South.
In 1988 relations between the Republic of Ireland and the UK were at a low ebb because of disagreements over decisions relating to the extradition of republican prisoners.
www.tiscali.co.uk /reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0024307.html   (2808 words)

  
 IRELAND ACT 1949 : Encyclopedia Entry
The Ireland Act 1949 is a British Act of Parliament which was intended to deal with the consequences of the Republic of Ireland Act 1948 as passed by the Irish parliament (Oireachtas).
The main provisions of the Ireland Act was the acceptance that the creation of a Republic of Ireland had meant that that state had left the Commonwealth of Nations, but that "...the Republic of Ireland is not a foreign country..." in British law.
Acts of Parliament of the Kingdom of Ireland
www.bibleocean.com /OmniDefinition/Ireland_Act_1949   (499 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Ireland   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The Island of Ireland is the second-largest island in Europe.
Northern Ireland, capital - Belfast, also referred to as the 'Six Counties' or 'Ulster' (the latter name is slightly confusing for outsiders as it is also the name of the historic province of Ulster which encompasses 3 counties in the Republic and 6 counties in Northern Ireland).
The major religions, the Roman Catholic Church, the Church of Ireland and the Presbyterian Church in Ireland, are organised on an all-island basis.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Ireland   (833 words)

  
 Ireland. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
Of the 32 counties of Ireland, 26 lie in the Republic, and of the four historic provinces, three and part of the fourth are in the Republic.
The English conquest of Ireland was begun by Richard de Clare, 2d earl of Pembroke, known as Strongbow, who intervened in behalf of a claimant to the throne of Leinster; in 1171, Henry himself went to Ireland, temporarily establishing his overlordship there.
Although Bruce was killed in 1318, the English authority in Ireland was weakening, becoming limited to a small district around Dublin known as the Pale; the rest of the country fell into a struggle for power among the ruling Anglo-Irish families and Irish chieftains.
www.bartleby.com /65/ir/Ireland.html   (2130 words)

  
 Embassy of Ireland - Washington, DC
The island of Ireland consists of a large central lowland of limestone with a relief of hills and several coastal mountains.
Ireland never experienced the barbarian invasions of the early medieval period and, partly as a result, the sixth and seventh centuries saw a flowering of Irish art, learning and culture centring on the Irish monasteries.
The descendants of the Norman settlers in Ireland, who came to be called the Old English, were, by and large, hostile to the Protestant reformation which led to the establishment of the Church of Ireland.
www.irelandemb.org /info.html   (5391 words)

  
 Republic of Ireland Act - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Republic of Ireland Act was an enactment of Oireachtas Éireann passed in 1948, which came into force on April 18, 1949 and which declared that the official description of Ireland was to be the Republic of Ireland.
The Oath of Allegiance, the theoretical cause of the split, was a symbol of the wider debate.
Under that Act, King George VI as King of Ireland acted as the Irish head of state in international relations.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Republic_of_Ireland_Act   (652 words)

  
 Republic of Ireland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The name Republic of Ireland came into use after the Republic of Ireland Act defined it as the official description of the state in 1949 (the purpose of the act being to declare that the state was a republic rather than a form of constitutional monarchy).
Though this state's constitutional structures provided for a President of Ireland instead of a king, it was not technically a republic; the principal key role possessed by a head of state, that of symbolically representing the state internationally remained vested, in statute law, in the King as an organ.
On 21 December 1948 the Republic of Ireland Act declared a republic, with the functions previously given to the King given instead to the President of Ireland.
www.higiena-system.com /wiki/link-Republic_of_Ireland   (4152 words)

  
 Irish head of state from 1936-1949 - Wiki Ireland
During the period of 1936 to 1949 it was unclear whether or not the Irish state was a republic or a form of constitutional monarchy, and whether its head of state was the President of Ireland or the King of Ireland, George VI.
The state's ambiguous status ended in 1949, when the Republic of Ireland Act stripped the King of his role in foreign affairs and declared that the state was a republic.
The Republic of Ireland Act, 1948, which came into force on 18th April, 1949, was remarkable in that it purported to reform the state into a republic without making any change to the constitution, the ambiguous provisions of which remained unaltered.
www.wiki.ie /wiki/Irish_head_of_state_from_1936-1949   (1342 words)

  
 History of the Law
Ireland is often described as 'the first adventure of the common law.' The dominance of English law was consolidated by Oliver Cromwell's military campaign (1649-1652), which forced many Irish landowners to resettle in Connaught.
The Act reorganised the court system in each jurisdiction to comprise a High Court and Court of Appeal, as well as a High Court of Appeal for Ireland to hear appeals from the respective Courts of Appeal.
It provided that the state shall be described as the Republic of Ireland and withdrew it from the Commonwealth.
www.courts.ie /courts.ie/Library3.nsf/pagecurrent/8B9125171CFBA78080256DE5004011F8   (1858 words)

  
 Embassy of Ireland
Ireland's membership of the EU is rooted in an understanding that the Union is the cornerstone of political and economic stability in Europe.
Ireland, recognising that all areas of the world are inter-dependent, acknowledges its obligation to contribute to the economic and social progress of the developing countries.
Ireland's membership of the EU is rooted in the understanding that the Union is the cornerstone of political and economic stability in Europe.
www.ireland-embassy.com.my /index.asp?id=8&page=about_dynamic_d   (13035 words)

  
 Ireland Information Guide , Irish, Counties, Facts, Statistics, Tourism, Culture, How
The President of Ireland (Irish: Uachtarán na hÉireann) is the head of state of the Republic of Ireland.
The original text of the Constitution of Ireland, as adopted in 1937, in its controversial Articles 2 and 3, mentioned two geopolitical entities, a thirty-two county 'National Territory' (i.e., the island of Ireland) and a twenty-six county 'state' formerly known as the Irish Free State (Articles 2 and 3 have since been amended).
Ireland in turn challenged the proclamation by the British parliament of Queen Elizabeth II in 1952 as 'queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
www.irelandinformationguide.com /President_of_Ireland   (2860 words)

  
 Civil Service Systems in Comparative Perspective
The Republic of Ireland -the domain of this paper- comprises 70,282 square kilometres of the island.
According to the 1991 census the population of the Republic of Ireland was 3,525,719.
During the 18th century, the Lord Lieutenant as the representative of the British Crown in Ireland was the head of the administration.
www.indiana.edu /~csrc/millar1.html   (2254 words)

  
 The Houses of the Oireachtas: An Historical Note - Tithe an Oireachtais
Following the Truce between Britain and Ireland in July 1921, which led to the suspension of the War of Independence, peace negotiations between the two countries were initiated and culminated in the signing of the "Articles of Agreement for a Treaty between Great Britain and Ireland" on 6 December 1921.
The Irish Free State Constitution remained in force until it was replaced by the Constitution of Ireland, which was passed by the Dáil on 14 June 1937, adopted by the people in a plebiscite on 1 July 1937, and came into operation on 29 December 1937.
The Act also stated that the description of the State is Republic of Ireland, but the name of the State remains Ireland in accordance with Article 4 of the Constitution.
www.oireachtas.ie /ViewDoc.asp?fn=/documents/a-misc/historicalnote.htm&CatID=112&m=y   (2846 words)

  
 Country Information
Ireland is a small, modern, trade-dependent economy with growth averaging 9.5% in 1995-98.
In 1822, an Act was passed establishing 4 provincial police forces with depots in the North (Armagh), West (Balinrobe), Midlands (Daingean) and South (Ballincollig).
Dublin has within its confines the residence of the Presidents of Ireland; the House of the Oireachtas (Parliament); Embassies, residences of members of the Diplomatic Corps; sittings of superior courts, etc. It is also the centre of various national and international events, all of which heavy demands on police personnel.
www.enp.nl /countryinformation/ireland.html   (2017 words)

  
 Origin of Ireland's Name   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Normally practice the name Éire is restricted to texts Ireland is used in all English-language texts, and of course equivalent translations are used in other languages.
The Republic of Ireland Act of 1948 provides a description of the State as: "the Republic of Ireland", but general usage of the state as Ireland is prevalent in the English language.
Ireland is derived from the Irish word Éire adding the Germanic word Land.
www.proud2beirish.com /Irelands-Name-Origin.htm   (306 words)

  
 History
Ireland, which, like Great Britain, once formed part of this landmass, lies on the European continental shelf, surrounded by seas that are generally less than 650 feet (200 metres) in depth.
The area of the 26 counties of the republic of Ireland is 27,137 square miles (70,285 square kilometres).
Ireland was an integral part of the United Kingdom from 1800 to 1922 when, by virtue of the Anglo-Irish Treaty of Dec. 6, 1921, the Irish Free State was established as an independent member of the British Commonwealth.
www.jansdigs.com /Ireland/history.html   (590 words)

  
 Ireland
It is divided politically into Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland; physically, it is composed of a large, fertile central plain roughly enclosed by a highland rim.
The Act of Union (1800) united England and Ireland; the Irish parliament was abolished, and Ireland was represented in the British parliament.
In the Republic of Ireland the agreement was passed by an overwhelming 94 percent to 6 percent; in Northern Ireland the vote was passed by a margin of 71 percent to 29 percent.
www.angelfire.com /apes/ulloajosesjr/Ireland.html   (4572 words)

  
 Wikinfo | King of Ireland   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
By the terms of the act (the Crown of Ireland Act) whoever was king of England was to be king of Ireland and so its first holder was King Henry VIII of England.
The title 'King of Ireland' remained as an adjunct to the kingship of England (since 1707 assumed into the kingship of Great Britain) until 1801, when the Act of Union which merged the Kingdoms of Ireland and Great Britain, came into force.
The Crown of Ireland Act was repealed in the republic of Ireland by the Statute Law Revision (Pre-Union Irish Statutes) Act 1962.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=King_of_Ireland   (747 words)

  
 Ireland: History, Geography, Government, and Culture — FactMonster.com
Ireland resembles a basin—a central plain rimmed with mountains, except in the Dublin region.
The Republic of Ireland was proclaimed on April 18, 1949, and withdrew from the Commonwealth.
The “troubles”—the violence and terrorist acts between Republicans and Unionists in both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland—would plague the island for the remainder of the century and beyond.
www.factmonster.com /ipka/A0107648.html   (1268 words)

  
 EU Presidency 2004 Website > Ireland > The State > The Irish State
In the first two decades after Ireland achieved independence in 1922, the institutions of the State were consolidated and a tradition of political stability was established.
The Republic of Ireland Act of 1948 provides for the description of the State as the Republic of Ireland but this provision has not changed the use of 'Ireland' as the name of the State in the English language.
Tradition holds that it was the use of the shamrock (a green trefoil) by Saint Patrick when preaching in Ireland that led to its adoption as an Irish symbol.
www.eu2004.ie /templates/standard.asp?sNavlocator=7,91,170   (390 words)

  
 www.St-Patricks-Day.com
Within the traditional four ecclesiastical provinces of Ulster (north-east), Leinster (south-eastern Ireland including the ancient kingdom of Meath), Munster (south-west), and Connaught (or Connacht, north-west) there are 32 counties, 26 of which are within the Republic.
Not surprisingly, the union in Ireland was highly unpopular and relations continued to deteriorate between the Catholic and Protestant populations.
It lasted only eleven years until 1948 when the ties with the Commonwealth were severed completely and the Republic of Ireland was born.
www.st-patricks-day.com /aboutireland_history.asp   (1188 words)

  
 Ireland Now Castles to Shamrocks An Exploration of Ireland   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Normal practice is to restrict the use of the name Éire to texts in the Irish language and to use Ireland in all English-language texts, with corresponding translations for texts in other languages.
The Republic of Ireland Act of 1948 provides for the description of the State as the Republic of Ireland but this provision has not changed the usage of Ireland as the name of the State in the English language.
The idea of Ireland as a heroine reappears as a common motif in later literature in both Irish and English.
www.ireland-now.com /statename.html   (281 words)

  
 Protected Areas Programme -   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The republic was first proclaimed in April 1916, and on 6 December 1921 a treaty was signed between Ireland and Great Britain by which Ireland accepted dominion status subject to the right of Northern Ireland to opt out.
Ireland is a member of the European Community and hence is bound by its environmental directives: 20 sites have been designated as EC special protection areas under the Wild Birds Directive.
Under the 1988 Forest Act, 90% of all state forest assets were transferred in 1989 to a new commercially- orientated state forestry board (Coillte Teoranta), the remainder continuing to be covered under the 1946 Act and administered by the Irish Forest Service.
www.unep-wcmc.org /protected_areas/data/countrysheets/irl.html   (3162 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
In the general election of 1948, Fianna Fáil won 68 of the 147 seats in the Dáil, but de Valera refused to enter a coalition.
Fearful of de Valera's prestige, Costello introduced in the Dáil the Republic of Ireland Act, which ended the fiction of Commonwealth membership that had been maintained since 1937.
Britain recognized the status of Ireland but declared that cession of the six counties could not occur without consent of the Parliament of Northern Ireland.
www.bampfa.berkeley.edu /exhibits/irish/irelandact.html   (198 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.