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Topic: Respiratory failure


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In the News (Tue 18 Jun 19)

  
  eMedicine - Respiratory Failure : Article by Margaret A Priestley, MD
Respiratory failure develops when the rate of gas exchange between the atmosphere and blood is unable to match the body's metabolic demands.
As a result, type I respiratory failure is characterized by arterial hypoxemia with normal or low arterial CO As an alternative, type II respiratory failure results from inadequate alveolar ventilation in relation to physiologic needs and is characterized by arterial hypercarbia and hypoxemia.
Respiratory failure may be the sign of an irreversible progressive disease that leads to death (eg, idiopathic pulmonary hypertension).
www.emedicine.com /ped/topic1994.htm   (6017 words)

  
  Respiratory failure - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Respiratory failure is a medical term for inadequate gas exchange by the respiratory system.
Respiratory failure can be indicated by observing a drop in blood oxygen level (hypoxemia) and/or a rise in arterial carbon dioxide (hypercapnia).
Type 1 respiratory failure is defined as hypoxia without hypercapnia, indeed the CO level may be normal or low.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Respiratory_failure   (238 words)

  
 Respiratory Failure - Causes, Symptoms & Treatment
Respiratory failure due to a disease of the muscles used for breathing ("pump or ventilatory apparatus failure") is called hypercapnic respiratory failure.
Respiratory failure is more common in women with asthma, in patients over 40 years of age, and in patients in whom treatment is delayed, or oral corticosteroid therapy is stopped suddenly.
One type of respiratory failure in the newborn infant, especially those born prematurely, is commonly referred to as "respiratory distress syndrome." It is also called hyaline membrane disease because of the formation of an abnormal, hyaline (glassy and transparent under the microscope), protein-containing membrane in alveoli.
www.healthnewsflash.com /conditions/respiratory_failure.php   (3609 words)

  
 Respiratory failure Summary
Respiratory failure is nearly any condition that affects breathing and ultimately results in failure of the lungs to function properly.
Respiratory distress syndrome, high altitudes (where there is less oxygen in the air), various forms of lung disease, severe anemia, and blood vessel disorders, can all prevent the lungs from extracting sufficient oxygen from the air.
Respiratory failure can be indicated by observing a drop in blood oxygen level (hypoxemia) and/or a rise in arterial carbon dioxide (hypercapnia).
www.bookrags.com /Respiratory_failure   (1281 words)

  
 Respiratory Failure | AHealthyMe.com
Respiratory failure is nearly any condition that affects breathing function or the lungs themselves and can result in failure of the lungs to function properly.
One common type of hypoxemic failure, occurring in both adults and prematurely born infants, is respiratory distress syndrome, a condition in which fluid or tissue changes prevent oxygen from passing out of the air sacs of the lungs into the circulating blood.
Once respiratory failure is present, it is best for a patient to receive treatment in an intensive care unit, where specialized personnel and all the needed equipment are available.
www.ahealthyme.com /topic/respfailure   (1566 words)

  
 eMedicine - Respiratory Failure : Article by Sat Sharma, MD, FRCPC, FACP, FCCP, DABSM
While acute respiratory failure is characterized by life-threatening derangements in arterial blood gases and acid-base status, the manifestations of chronic respiratory failure are less dramatic and may not be as readily apparent.
Respiratory failure may be classified as hypoxemic or hypercapnic and may be either acute or chronic.
Once respiratory failure is suspected on clinical grounds, arterial blood gas analysis should be performed to confirm the diagnosis and to assist in the distinction between acute and chronic forms.
www.emedicine.com /med/topic2011.htm   (10136 words)

  
 Respiratory failure Encyclopedia of Nursing and Allied Health - Find Articles
Respiratory failure occurs when the lungs' ability to either add oxygen to the bloodstream or remove carbon dioxide from it is impaired.
Respiratory failure can have any one of several causes, such as lung disease or infection, electrolyte imbalance, interruption of the nerve signals that regulate breathing or nervous system damage, structural (rib cage) collapse, or airway obstruction.
One common type of hypoxemic respiratory failure, which occurs in both adults and premature infants, is respiratory distress syndrome, a condition in which fluid or tissue changes or physical immaturity prevent oxygen from passing out of the lungs' air sacs into the circulating blood.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_gGENH/is_/ai_2699003683?lstpn=article_results&lstpc=search&lstpr=external&lstprs=other&lstwid=1&lstwn=search_results&lstwp=body_middle   (813 words)

  
 Respiratory failure
Respiratory failure is nearly any condition that affects breathing function or the lungs themselves and can result in failure of the lungs to function properly.
One common type of hypoxemic failure, occurring in both adults and prematurely born infants, is respiratory distress syndrome, a condition in which fluid or tissue changes prevent oxygen from passing out of the air sacs of the lungs into the circulating blood.
Once respiratory failure is present, it is best for a patient to receive treatment in an intensive care unit, where specialized personnel and all the needed equipment are available.
www.healthatoz.com /healthatoz/Atoz/ency/respiratory_failure.jsp   (1555 words)

  
 Respiratory failure definition - Lungs: pulmonary and respiratory health and medical information produced by doctors
Respiratory failure: Inability of the lungs to perform their basic task of gas exchange, the transfer of oxygen from inhaled air into the blood and the transfer of carbon dioxide from the blood into exhaled air.
The basis of respiratory failure may be failure of the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide within the tiny air sacs (alveoli) in the lungs; failure of the muscles required to expand the lungs; or failure of the brain centers controlling respiration.
Failure of the ventilatory apparatus or respiratory centers: Whenever any part of the ventilatory apparatus and/or the respiratory centers fails to work properly, the result can be respiratory failure.
www.medterms.com /script/main/art.asp?articlekey=10698   (410 words)

  
 Respiratory failure (types I and II)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Respiratory failure is a disease of the lungs.
Respiratory failure occurs when gas echange at the lungs is sufficiently impaired to cause a drop in blood levels of oxgyen (hypoxaemia); this may occur with or without an increase in carbon dioxide levels.
Respiratory failure is common, as it occurs in any severe lung disease - it can also occur as a part of multi-organ failure.
www.virtualrespiratorycentre.com /diseases.asp?did=31   (816 words)

  
 Respiratory Failure - StopGettingSick News
Although failure to breathe normally was recognized even in ancient times as an ominous sign, the term, "respiratory failure," did not appear in the medical literature until the 1960s.
Respiratory failure due to a disease of the muscles used for breathing ("pump or ventilatory apparatus failure") is called hypercapnic respiratory failure.
Since the immediate threat to patients with respiratory failure is due to the inadequate level of oxygen delivered to the tissues, oxygenation is the basic therapy for acute respiratory failure due to lung disease.
www.stopgettingsick.com /Condtemplate.cfm-2404-266-1   (2597 words)

  
 Respiratory Failure: Lung and Airway Disorders: Merck Manual Home Edition
Respiratory failure is a condition in which the level of oxygen in the blood becomes dangerously low or the level of carbon dioxide becomes dangerously high.
Respiratory failure, which is a medical emergency, is often the final stage of chronic lung disease.
Respiratory failure can also result from severe, sudden lung disease (such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (see Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS))) in otherwise healthy people.
www.merck.com /mmhe/sec04/ch055/ch055a.html   (856 words)

  
 [No title]
Respiratory failure is defined as the impairment of the lung's ability to maintain adequate oxygen and carbon dioxide homeostasis, This may develop acutely (minutes to hours) or subacutely (days to months).
An alternative way to categorize respiratory failure is to enumerate the anatomic locations where impairment may be expected to lead to respiratory failure.
Because of the life threatening nature of respiratory failure, treatment and stabilization of the patient occurs simultaneously with determination of the inciting event(s).
medocs.ucdavis.edu /imd/420c/eSyllabus/failure.htm   (1410 words)

  
 ATS: Respiratory Failure After Curative Resection Of Lung Cancer   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Respiratory failure following surgery for lung cancer is a serious complication with unclear etiology.
However, the significance of underlying lung disease in predicting respiratory failure and its outcome is less well studied.
This study was conducted to better define the clinical characteristics of respiratory failure occurring in patients undergoing thoracic surgery and then assess the relationship of these complications to underlying pulmonary status.
www.pslgroup.com /dg/1fbcca.htm   (498 words)

  
 Biological Weapons Information - Federation of American Scientists
Respiratory failure secondary to paralysis of respiratory muscles is the most serious complication and, generally, the cause of death.
In untreated patients, the mortality is 100 percent with the terminal event being respiratory failure, circulatory collapse, and a bleeding diathesis.
In oral intoxication, fever, gastrointestinal involvement, and vascular collapse are prominent, the latter differentiating it from infection with enteric pathogens.
www.fas.org /biosecurity/resource/agents.htm   (8053 words)

  
 Respiratory failure - Genesis Health System
This can be caused by drugs or alcohol, which depress the respiratory center; extreme obesity; or sleep apnea, where patients stop breathing for long periods while sleeping.
Also, it can often be a result of heart disease; respiratory distress syndrome; pulmonary fibrosis and other scarring diseases of the lung; radiation exposure; burn injury when smoke is inhaled; and widespread lung cancer.
When respiratory failure develops slowly, pressure may build up in the lung's blood vessels, a condition called pulmonary hypertension.
www.genesishealth.com /conditions/DetailedDisease/001160.aspx   (1571 words)

  
 NIH Press Release - Inhaled Treatment Effective for Hypoxic Respiratory Failure in Newborns - 02/26/1997
Treatment with inhaled nitric oxide is an effective therapy for hypoxic respiratory failure in term and near-term infants, according to the lead article in the February 27, 1997 New England Journal of Medicine.
Hypoxic respiratory failure is a potentially fatal condition in which newborn infants, for a variety of reasons, cannot breathe in enough oxygen to survive.
Because hypoxic respiratory failure is an uncommon disease in newborns, previous studies that have attempted to prove that nitric oxide reduces the incidence of death or the need for ECMO have failed because they have been unable to enroll enough infants to assess the impact of nitric oxide on these important outcomes.
www.nih.gov /news/pr/feb97/nichd-26.htm   (600 words)

  
 Respiratory Syncytial Virus
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory illness in young children.
In children younger than age 3, RSV can cause a lower respiratory tract illness like bronchiolitis or pneumonia and in more severe cases can lead to respiratory failure.
Children who are hospitalized with lower respiratory tract illness usually spend 5 to 7 days in the hospital.
kidshealth.org /parent/infections/bacterial_viral/rsv.html   (1166 words)

  
 AccessMedicine - Harrison's Internal Medicine: Respiratory Failure
Respiratory failure is one of the most common reasons patients are admitted to the ICU.
Respiratory failure can be categorized mechanically, based on pathophysiologic derangements in respiratory function.
This form of respiratory failure occurs when alveolar flooding and subsequent intrapulmonary shunt physiology occur.
www.accessmedicine.com /content.aspx?aID=85797   (317 words)

  
 NQMC NGC Summary
This measure is used to assess the number of cases of acute respiratory failure per 1,000 elective surgical discharges with an operating room procedure.
The Postoperative Respiratory Failure indicator is intended to flag cases of postoperative respiratory failure.
This indicator limits the code for respiratory failure to secondary diagnosis codes to eliminate respiratory failure that was present on admission.
www.qualitymeasures.ahrq.gov /summary/summary.aspx?doc_id=6024   (1029 words)

  
 Intubate Early in Neuromuscular Respiratory Failure
ARLY IN “The diaphragm is the respiratory muscle that fails first in most neuromuscular diseases,” said Allan H. Ropper, MD. This difference has implications for the evaluation and treatment (including timing of intubation) of patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome and other neuromuscular diseases, he said.
Respiratory failure may be a presenting sign in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, acid maltase deficiency, and critical illness myopathy.
While mild hypoxia is the signature feature of early neuromuscular respiratory failure, the work required of the diaphragm is intensified by pulmonary arteriovenous shunting brought on by atelectasis.
www.pulmonaryreviews.com /oct01/pr_oct01_intubate.html   (1194 words)

  
 Respiratory Distress
Respiratory distress - outwardly evident, physically labored ventilation or respiratory efforts; clinically evident inability to adequately ventilate and/or oxygenate.
Mechanical ventilation is indicated for patients with ventilatory failure and for patients with severe hypoxemia unresponsive to supplemental oxygen administration by face mask, nasal cannula, or oxygen cage.
ARDS is a life-threatening form of respiratory failure due to acute lung injury.
www.cvmbs.colostate.edu /clinsci/wing/trauma/dyspnea.htm   (3077 words)

  
 Undiagnosed respiratory failure
Questions in The Respiratory Disorders Forum are being answered by doctors and health care professionals from National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver, Colorado, which is consistently ranked the #1 hospital in America.
I was also told that she stopped producing red blood cells which caused oxygen starvation.
Ultimately she suffered massive kidney failure which led to her death.
www.medhelp.org /forums/RespiratoryDisorders/messages/847.html   (436 words)

  
 Respiratory Flutter Syndrome . An Underrecognized Cause of Respiratory Failure in Neonates -- KATZ et al. 164 (7): 1161 ...
An Underrecognized Cause of Respiratory Failure in Neonates -- KATZ et al.
In summary, we report the clinical and respiratory findings of three neonates with RF who presented with respiratory failure.
Respiratory dysrhythmia: a new cause of central alveolar hypoventilation.
ajrccm.atsjournals.org /cgi/content/full/164/7/1161   (2416 words)

  
 Non-invasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure -- 57 (3): 192 -- Thorax
Non-invasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure -- 57 (3): 192 -- Thorax
NIV is not suitable for all patients with respiratory failure.
16%, on a respiratory ward in 24%, on HDU in 12%, on ICU in
thorax.bmjjournals.com /cgi/content/full/57/3/192   (9898 words)

  
 Respiratory Failure - New Treatments, May 2, 2006   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Thinking about the differential for respiratory drive, largely it’s a failure of the signal generator to send out a signal or perhaps the wires.
Brainstem suppression is common and it’s almost exclusively due to drugs we give and so usually, for example, with brainstem damage due to trauma or disease, you stimulate drive.
I think to look at drive, you really want to look at the breathing pattern and essentially if the patient is in respiratory distress, their drive is intact.
www.ccspublishing.com /journals3a/respiratory_failure.htm   (556 words)

  
 Acute Respiratory Failure
Acute respiratory failure remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in both pediatric and adult populations.
ALI is defined as a syndrome of inflammation and increased permeability that is associated with a constellation of clinical, radiologic, and physiologic abnormalities that cannot be explained by, but may coexist with, left atrial or pulmonary capillary hypertension.
ECMO for pediatric respiratory failure: Predictors of survival from 220 patients.
www.dcmsonline.org /jax-medicine/1998journals/september98/respiratoryfailure.htm   (4195 words)

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