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Topic: Retroflex consonant


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  HLW: Word Forms: Units: Consonants 1
This consonant dimension is known as place of articulation; we will see later that the place of articulation is also relevant when there isn't a complete closure of the vocal tract.
For nasal consonants, the air is allowed to pass through the nasal cavity, but it also resonates in the oral cavity, and the place of articulation (within the oral cavity) distinguishes different nasal consonants from one another.
The consonants that are the least vowel-like are stops, which involve a complete closure of the vocal tract and cannot be pronounced continuously.
www.indiana.edu /~hlw/PhonUnits/consonants1.html   (3678 words)

  
  retroflex consonant - Article and Reference from OnPedia.com
Retroflex consonants are articulated with the tip of the tongue curled up and back so the bottom of the tip touches the roof of the mouth.
Note: In the International Phonetic Alphabet, the symbols for retroflex consonants are typically the same as for the alveolar consonants, but with the addition of a right-facing hook to the bottom of the symbol.
Retroflex consonants are common in the Indo-Aryan languages and the Dravidian languages; and can also be found in languages such as Mandarin Chinese, Javanese, Vietnamese, Swedish, Norwegian and some languages of Southern Italy and Sardinia.
www.onpedia.com /encyclopedia/retroflex-consonant   (135 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Retroflex consonant
Retroflex consonants identified by the International Phonetic Alphabet are: In speech, consonants may have different places of articulation, generally with full or partial stoppage of the airstream.
Alveolars are consonants articulated with the tip of the tongue against the alveolar ridge, the internal side of the upper gums (known as the alveoles of the upper teeth).
Postalveolar (or palato-alveolar) consonants are consonants articulated with the tip of the tongue between the alveolar ridge (the place of articulation for alveolar consonants) and the palate (the place of articulation for palatal consonants).
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Retroflex-consonant   (1855 words)

  
 Consonant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
There are a group of consonants called sonorants that sometimes act as vowels, occupying the peak of a syllable, and sometimes act as consonants.
Consonant letters in the English alphabet are B, C, D, F, G, H, J, K, L, M, N, P, Q, R, S, T, V, W, X, Z, and sometimes Y — the letter Y stands for the consonant [j] in "yoke" but for the vowel [ɪ] in "myth", for example.
The phonation method of a consonant is whether or not the vocal cords are vibrating during articulation of a consonant.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Consonant   (708 words)

  
 Retroflex consonant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The consonants commonly called "postalveolar", or more precisely "palato-alveolar", as well as the "alveolo-palatals", are also pronounced in the postalveolar region.
The consonants commonly called "palatal" are also pronounced in the palatal region, but are more precisely "dorso-palatal", meaning that they are dorsal (articulated with the dorsum or back of the tongue), rather than coronal like retroflex consonants.
In other words, retroflex consonants are coronal consonants articulated behind the alveolar ridge, which do not have the secondary articulation of palatalization.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Retroflex_consonant   (548 words)

  
 Postalveolar consonant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Postalveolar consonants are consonants articulated with the tongue between the alveolar ridge (the place of articulation for alveolar consonants) and the palate (the place of articulation for palatal consonants).
The alveolo-palatal and retroflex consonants are also postalveolar in their point of articulation, but they are given separate columns in the IPA chart.
The difference between palato-alveolar, alveolo-palatal, and retroflex is in the shape of the tongue rather than the place of articulation: in palato-alveolars, like English sh, the tongue is bunched-up ("domed"); in alveolo-palatals, like Mandarin x, the tongue is flat ("laminal"), and in retroflex consonants like Mandarin sh, the tip of the tongue is raised ("apical").
www.peekskill.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Postalveolar_consonant   (216 words)

  
 Alveolar consonant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Alveolar consonants are articulated with the tongue against or close to the superior alveolar ridge, which is called that because it contains the alveoli (the sockets) of the superior teeth.
Alveolar consonants may be articulated with the tip of the tongue (so-called apical consonants), as in English, or with the flat of the tongue just above the tip (the "blade" of the tongue; called laminal consonants), as in French and Spanish.
The alveolar/coronal consonants identified by the IPA are:
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Alveolar_consonant   (342 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Bilabial consonant
In phonetics, a bilabial consonant is a consonant articulated with both lips.
Coronal consonants are articulated with the flexible front part of the tongue.
Glottal consonants are consonants articulated with the glottis.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Bilabial-consonant   (1205 words)

  
 Retroflex - UniLang Wiki   (Site not responding. Last check: )
A retroflex consonant is a consonant in which the tip of the tongue is curled back and touching the palate.
In IPA retroflex consonants are marked with a little hook, e.g.: ɖ ɳ ʂ ʐ ɻ ɭ ʈ ɽ.
Several Indian languages have retroflex plosives, fricatives and nasals as phonemes: Hindi and Sanskrit ट् ṭ [ʈ], ठ् ṭh [ʈʰ], ड् ḍ [ɖ], ढ् ḍh [ɖʰ], ष् ṣ [ʂ], ण् ṇ [ɳ].
home.unilang.org /main/wiki2/index.php/Retroflex   (122 words)

  
 wiki/Labial consonant Definition / wiki/Labial consonant Research   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Labiodental In phonetics, labiodentals are consonants articulated with the lower lips and the upper teeth, or viceversa.
Retroflex Retroflex consonants are articulated with the tip of the tongue curled up and back so the bottom of the tip touches the roof of the mouth.
Retroflex consonants identified by the International Phonetic Alphabet: Note: In the International Phonetic Alphabet, the symbols for retroflex consonants are typically the same as for the alveolar consonants, but with the addition of a right-facing hook to the bottom of the symbol....
www.elresearch.com /wiki/Labial_consonant   (606 words)

  
 Ilya Writing
In the cases of vowel pairs the first vowel is a spread vowel, where the corners of the mouth are held far apart, and the second is a rounded vowel, where the lips are held in an "o" shape.
With consonant pairs, the first is unvoiced (no vocal cord vibration), the second is voiced, said exactly the same way, but with the vocal cords vibrating.
Bilabial Consonant, where the sound is produced by the motion of the lips.
homepage.mac.com /pfhreak/ilya/writing/letters.html   (548 words)

  
 POSTALVEOLAR CONSONANT FACTS AND INFORMATION   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Postalveolar consonants are consonants articulated with the tongue near or touching the ''back'' of the alveolar_ridge, placing them a bit further back in the mouth than the alveolar_consonants, which are at the ridge itself, but not as far back as the hard palate (the place of articulation for palatal_consonants).
The alveolo-palatal and retroflex consonants are also postalveolar in their point of articulation, but they are given separate columns in the IPA chart, and illustrated with examples in their own articles.
The difference between ''palato-alveolar'', ''alveolo-palatal'', ''retroflex'', and several other articulations is in the shape of the tongue rather than the location of the contact with the roof of the mouth.
www.witwib.com /postalveolar_consonant   (474 words)

  
 Retroflex nasal . X-SAMPA . Unicode   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Like all the retroflex consonants, the IPA symbol is formed by adding a rightward pointing hook extending from the bottom of the symbol used for the equivalent alveolar consonant, in this case the alveolar nasal which has the symbol n.
Features of the retroflex nasal: Its manner of articulation is stop consonant plosive or stop, which means it is produced by obstructing airflow in the vocal tract.
Its place of articulation is retroflex consonant retroflex which means it is articulated with the tip of the tongue curled up.
www.uk.fraquisanto.net /Retroflex_nasal   (508 words)

  
 IPA Tables
Compare the consonant at the beginning of the sounds: pair and bare; tail and dale; kiddy and giddy; sue and zoo, few and view.
Formed by as plosive consonants, but with slower separation of the articulating organs, so thatthe corresponding fricative is audible as the separation takes place.
Consonants which can be held on continuously without change of quality are sometimes classed together as contunatives or continuantsl they include nasal, lateral, rolled, fricative consonants and frictionless sounds.
www.sungwh.freeserve.co.uk /sapienti/phon/ipasymb.htm   (1574 words)

  
 Velar consonant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Since the velar region of the roof of the mouth is relatively extensive and the movements of the dorsum are not very precise, velars easily undergo assimilation, shifting their articulation back or to the front depending on the quality of adjacent vowels.
There are also labial-velar consonants, which are doubly articulated at the velum and at the lips, such as [k͡p].
The velar consonants identified by the International Phonetic Alphabet are:
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Velar_consonant   (249 words)

  
 Uvular consonant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
They may be plosives, fricatives, nasal stops, trills, or approximants, though the IPA does not provide a separate symbol for the approximant, and the symbol for the voiced fricative is used instead.
The uvular consonants identified by the International Phonetic Alphabet are:
Uvular consonants are found in many African and Middle-Eastern languages, most notably Arabic, and in Native American languages.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Uvular_consonant   (455 words)

  
 Artificial Languages -- Some Essential Features
Consonants: 32 consonants: 13 plosives, 4 nasals, 10 fricatives, 1 trill, and 4 approximants.
Consonants: 34 consonants: 13 plosives, 13 fricatives, 2 affricates, 3 nasals, 2 approximants, 1 trill.
Consonants: 20 consonants: 6 plosives, 6 fricatives, 2 affricates, 3 nasals, 2 approximants, 1 trill.
www.cc.jyu.fi /~tojan/alang/alang2.htm   (3562 words)

  
 Consonant   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The word consonant comes from Latin meaning "sounding with" or "sounding together", the idea being that consonants don't sound on their own, but only occur with a nearby vowel, although this conception of consonants does not reflect a modern linguistic understanding of consonants, which defines consonants in terms of vocal tract constrictions.
The letter Y stands for a consonant in "yoke" but for a vowel in "myth".
In music, a stable interval or chord is consonant, this property being consonance, the opposite of dissonance.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/consonant   (573 words)

  
 Describing consonants
Which consonant you're pronouncing depends on where in the vocal tract the constriction is and how narrow it is. It also depends on a few other things, such as whether the vocal folds are vibrating and whether air is flowing through the nose.
In an alveolar consonant, the tongue tip (or less often the tongue blade) approaches or touches the alveolar ridge, the ridge immediately behind the upper teeth.
It is often useful to display the consonants of a language in the form of a chart.
www.umanitoba.ca /faculties/arts/linguistics/russell/phonetics/articulation/describing-consonants.html   (1759 words)

  
 A Guide To The IPA   (Site not responding. Last check: )
This indicates that the consonant is aspirated: tʰ, dʰ.
This indicates that the consonant is labialized; that is, pronounced with rounded lips: [tʷ].
This indicates that the consonant is pharyngealized; that is, pronounced with a constricted pharynx: [tˤ].
www.ultrasw.com /pawlowski/brendan/ipa.html   (4418 words)

  
 Lateral consonant - Psychology Wiki
Laterals are "L"-like consonants pronounced with an occlusion made somewhere along the axis of the tongue, while air from the lungs escapes at one side or both sides of the tongue.
The other variant, so-called dark l found before consonants or word-finally, as in bold or tell, is pronounced as the velarized alveolar lateral approximant [ɫ;] with the tongue assuming a spoon-like shape with its back part raised, which gives the sound a [w]- or [ɰ]-like resonance.
Rarer lateral consonants include the retroflex laterals that can be found in most Indic languages; and the sound of Welsh ll, the voiceless alveolar lateral fricative [ɬ;] that is also found in Zulu and many Native American languages.
psychology.wikia.com /wiki/Lateral_consonant   (645 words)

  
 Retroflex@Everything2.com
The retroflex gesture of the tip of the tongue touching the back of the hard palette occurs extensively in Sanskrit.
Retroflex sounds occur in most Dravidian languages of India, and it is quite likely that this is the source of the Sanskrit series, which does not occur in any closely related language; and in most Australian Aboriginal languages.
The place of articulation of these sounds is technically postalveolar, with retroflexion as an additional articulation of the tongue; but usually the retroflex series are treated as a distinct place of articulation between dental and palatal.
www.everything2.com /?node_id=317096   (526 words)

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