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Topic: Revised Julian calendar


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In the News (Wed 19 Jun 19)

  
  Revised Julian calendar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The synod synchronized the new calendar with the Gregorian calendar by specifying that 1 October 1923 in the Julian calendar will be 14 October in the Revised Julian calendar, thus dropping thirteen days.
It then adopted a leap year rule that differs from that of the Gregorian calendar: Years evenly divisible by four are leap years, except that years evenly divisible by 100 are not leap years, unless they leave a remainder of 200 or 600 when divided by 900, then they are leap years.
This means that the two calendars will first differ in 2800, which will be a leap year in the Gregorian calendar, but a common year in the Revised Julian calendar.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Revised_Julian_calendar   (557 words)

  
 CalendarHome.com - Revised Julian calendar - Calendar Encyclopedia
The Revised Julian calendar is the calendar that was adopted by the Eastern Orthdox church in 1923, to replace the Julian calendar.
It uses a different rule for the leap year than the Gregorian calendar, used by the rest of Christianity and by the world in general for secular purposes.
The two calendars are identical for all years from 1601 until 2799.
encyclopedia.calendarhome.com /Revised_Julian_calendar.htm   (176 words)

  
 Leap year   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
The Gregorian calendar is designed to keep the vernal equinox on or close to March 21, so that the date of Easter (celebrated on the Sunday after the 14th day of the Moon that falls on or after March 21) remains correct with respect to the vernal equinox.
The Gregorian calendar is a modification of the Julian calendar first used by the Romans.
The Revised Julian calendar adds an extra day to February in years divisible by 4, except for years divisible by 100 that do not leave a remainder of 200 or 600 when divided by 900.
www.bidprobe.com /en/wikipedia/l/le/leap_year.html   (1263 words)

  
 julian calendar   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
The Julian calendar was in general use in Europe from the times of the Roman Empire until 1582, when Pope Gregory XIII promulgated the Gregorian Calendar, which was soon adopted by most Catholic countries.
Russia remained on the Julian calendar until after the Russian Revolution (which is thus called the 'October Revolution' but occurred in November according to the Gregorian calendar).
Easter, Pentecost, and their associated holy days are still calculated according to the Julian calendar in the Eastern Orthodox churches, and some Eastern Orthodox churches continue to use the Julian Calendar for all their church calendar dates.
www.yourencyclopedia.net /Julian_Calendar.html   (1178 words)

  
 Revised Julian calendar   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
The Revised Julian calendar is a calendar that was considered for adoption by the Eastern Orthodox Church at a convention in Istanbul in 1923.
The civil part of the calendar is identical to the Gregorian calendar except for the leap year rule, which is that leap years are divisible by 4, except for years divisible by 100 that do not leave a remainder of 200 or 600 when divided by 900.
The Revised Julian calendar was adopted in 1923 by the Greek and Syrian Orthodox churches, among others (the New calendarists), while the Russian and Serbian Orthodox churches, among others, remained on the Julian calendar (the Old calendarists).
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/revised_julian_calendar   (251 words)

  
 Julian calendar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Julian calendar remained in use into the 20th century in some countries and is still used by many national Orthodox churches.
Russia remained on the Julian calendar until after the Russian Revolution (which is thus called the 'October Revolution' but occurred in November according to the Gregorian calendar), in 1917, while Greece continued to use it until 1923.
A revised Julian calendar was proposed during a synod in Constantinople in May of 1923, consisting of a solar part which was and will be identical to the Gregorian calendar until the year 2800, and a lunar part which calculated Easter astronomically at Jerusalem.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Julian_calendar   (2453 words)

  
 Caesar's Calendar Changes
These changes resulted in the new Julian Calendar which converted their old nominally lunar calendar to one that was truly solar.
This problem had been known and discussed for several centuries, but the Julian Calendar was not revised further until the time of Pope Gregory, near the end of this era's sixteenth century.
In order to keep that calendar in phase with the solar year, 5 "epagomenal" days were observed after the twelfth month in three out of each four years.
www.12x30.net /julian.html   (608 words)

  
 The Gregorian Calendar
The only difference between the "Improved" and the Gregorian calendar was the determination of Easter but finally, in 1775, the Protestants threw over board their "astronomical" Easter calculation and, since 1776, celebrated Easter together with the Catholic church.
Russia adopted the Julian calendar as late as 1700, until then counting the years from the "creation of the world" which was assumed to have taken place in 5509 BCE, and beginning the year on 1 September.
The Julian calendar was switched to by declaring that 31 December 7208 should be followed by 1 January 1700.
www.ortelius.de /kalender/greg_en.php   (582 words)

  
 Notes on the Orthodox Ecclesiastical Calendar
The Julian Calendar was used by the European (and Christan) communities until the Gregorian reform of 1582.
The Julian Calendar (and the feasts tied to it) are occuring later in the year (compared to the Gregorian calendar).
The date of Fixed celebrations in the Orthodox calendar is made more difficult by the fact that there are currently differing schools of thought on whether to use the Gregorian or the Julian calendar to determine the date of the Feasts that occur on fixed dates.
www.smart.net /~mmontes/ortheast.html   (1105 words)

  
 Talk:Julian calendar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In your description you state that Easter and Pentecost are calculated using the "revised Julian calendar" but that the Nativity (the fixed date of 25 December) uses the "new calendar".
So the revised Julian calendar will be equal to the Gregorian calendar until 2800 (which is what I said in the description you reverted).
One possible solution is to discuss the medieval Julian calendar at the beginning of the article, and then discuss its history, including the many changes during its early years, only later in the article, which may still overwhelm it.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Talk:Julian_calendar   (1717 words)

  
 Revised Julian calendar -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
This means that the two calendars will first differ in 2800, which will be a leap year in the Gregorian calendar, but a (A year that is not a leap year) common year in the Revised Julian calendar.
Milankovic selected this rule, which produces an average year length of 365.242222… days, because it was within two seconds of the then current length of the mean (The time for the earth to make one revolution around the sun, measured between two vernal equinoxes) tropical year.
However, the (March 21) vernal equinox year is slightly longer, so for a few thousand years the Revised Julian calendar doesn't do as good a job as the Gregorian calendar at keeping the vernal equinox on or close to March 21.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/r/re/revised_julian_calendar.htm   (458 words)

  
 The Revised Julian Calendar
The Revised Julian Calendar was adopted by the Eastern Orthodox Church in 1923 for the same reasons that the Gregorian Calendar had been adopted by the Catholic Church -- to correct for date drift in the Julian Calendar.
As with the Gregorian Calendar, it involves a realignment of the calendar and a change in leap year rules.
Within the years spanning 1600 to 2799, the Revised Julian and Gregorian calendars are the same.
www.furrfu.com /magpies/cal_revjulian.html   (145 words)

  
 Leap year - Biocrawler definition:Leap year - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
The Gregorian calendar adds an extra day to February, making it 29 days long, in years where the quotient has no remainder when divided by 4, excluding years where the quotient has no remainder when divided by 100, but including years where the quotient has no remainder when divided by 400.
In the Hindu calendar which is lunisolar calendar, embolistic month called adhika maas(extra month) is added when the lunar year went about 30 days behind the solar calendar.
The Iranian calendar also has a single intercalated day once in every four years, but every 33 years or so the leap years will be five years apart instead of four years apart.
www.biocrawler.com /biowiki/Leap_year   (1814 words)

  
 About the Calendar   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
The Roman government used the Julian Calendar for official purposes during the events of the New Testament, but the general population continued to use their own local calendars.
It used the Julian Calendar for this purpose, because even though people preferred to use their local calendars, they could easily determine the date in the Julian Calendar no matter where they were.
In 1582, Pope Gregory revised the Julian Calendar to fix this problem, and the result is the Gregorian Calendar that we all use for civil purposes.
www.kencollins.com /calendar.htm   (896 words)

  
 CalendarHome.com - Julian calendar - Calendar Encyclopedia
This was further complicated by politics in which the calendar was modified to lengthen ones term in office.
In order to re-align the calendar to what the Romans thought of as the correct seasons, 90 days were inserted.
According to the 13th century scholar Sacrobosco, the original scheme for months in the Julian Calendar was very regular, alternating long and short with an exception at the end of the year at the end of February.
encyclopedia.calendarhome.com /Julian_calendar.htm   (1137 words)

  
 Julian Calendar : Julian calendar   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
The Julian calendar was selected by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, taking force in 45 BC or 709 ab urbe condita.
Various systems of year numbering were used with the Julian calendar, starting with ab urbe condita (from the supposed founding of Rome) or the reign year of the current ruler.
Easter, Christmas and New Year are still calculated according to the Julian calendar in the Eastern Orthodox churches, and some Eastern Orthodox churches continue to use the Julian Calendar for all their church calendar dates.
www.city-search.org /ju/julian-calendar.html   (964 words)

  
 Julian calendar biography .ms   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
The calendar remained in use into the 20th century in some countries and is still used by many national Orthodox churches.
In the 16th century the Gregorian calendar reform was introduced to improve its accuracy with respect to the time of the vernal equinox and the synodic month (for Easter).
Despite the new calendar being much simpler than the Roman calendar, those tasked with implementing it, the Pontifices, apparently misunderstood the algorithm.
julian-calendar.biography.ms   (2011 words)

  
 New Calendar - OrthodoxWiki
The Gregorian Calendar, a calendar introduced in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII of the Roman Catholic Church and used in the Church of Finland.
The Revised Julian Calendar, the calendar considered by a synod of Orthodox churches in 1923 in Constantinople.
This is functionally identical to the Gregorian Calendar except for the Paschal cycle (which is still reckoned according to the Julian timetables) and leap year calculation.
orthodoxwiki.org /New_Calendar   (134 words)

  
 Home Page for Calendar Reform
Each recommended a perennial calendar involving the use of so-called "blank days." The blank day concept was suggested originally, perhaps, by an American colonist from Maryland in 1745 writing under the pseudonym of Hirossa Ap-Iccim.
Because the Julian leap-year rule was not followed correctly at first, Caesar Augustus introduced a subsequent calendar correction around 8 BC.
With the lengths of the year and months established, the Julian Calendar still preserved the Roman Kalends, Nones and Ides for the divisions within the months.
personal.ecu.edu /mccartyr/calendar-reform.html   (837 words)

  
 HTC: The "Revised" Julian Calendar
There is only one JULIAN CALENDAR in the western world the original Julian Calendar was adopted by the Church without correction of its technical errors Then it was refined twice: once by the Church in the West and once by the Church in the East.
This version of the "New Style" Julian Calendar is popularly called the Gregorian Calendar and is used by the Church in the West for both fixed and moveable feasts.
The "Revised" Julian Calendar is not the work of evil or a scheme to convert the Orthodox Church to the Roman Catholic Church.
www.holy-trinity.org /modern/calen3.html   (1300 words)

  
 wikien.info: Main_Page   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
The Gregorian calendar adds an extra day to February, making it 29 days long, in years divisible by 4, excluding years divisible by 100, but including years divisible by 400.
The excess of about 0.0076 days with respect to the vernal equinox tropical year means that the vernal equinox moves a day earlier in the calendar every 130 years or so.
In the Hebrew calendar the extra month is called Adar Rishon (first Adar) and is added before Adar, which then becomes Adar Sheni (second Adar).
www.hostingciamca.com /index.php?title=Leap_year   (1305 words)

  
 Fr. Alexander Lebedeff - On the Calendar   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
The old calendar is supposed to be astronomically inaccurate, and the new calendar fixes this.
The holy fathers who established the Church calendar knew perfectly well that assigning the vernal equinox to a fixed date was astronomically inaccurate.
No one has come up with an answer as to why it is OK to use a "Revised Julian Calendar" that severely shortens or even eliminates the ages-old Apostle's Fast, or that will (albeit some time from now) allow Pascha to drift forward through the Church year until it can coincide with the Nativity.
www.stjohndc.org /russian/What/e_Clndr-AL1.htm   (1906 words)

  
 [No title]
The Gregorian calendar is designed to keep the vernal equinox on or close to March 21, so that the date of
vernal equinox tropical year means that the vernal equinox moves a day earlier in the calendar every 130 years or so.
vernal equinox tropical year is slightly longer, the Revised Julian calendar does not do as good a job as the Gregorian calendar of keeping the vernal equinox on or close to March 21.
en-cyclopedia.com /wiki/Leap_year   (1236 words)

  
 2. The Christian Calendar
The Gregorian calendar replaced the Chinese calendar in 1912, but the Gregorian calendar was not used throughout the country until the communist revolution of 1949.
In the Julian calendar the relationship between the days of the week and the dates of the year is repeated in cycles of 28 years.
In the Julian calendar, the Epact is the age of the moon on 22 March.
www.tondering.dk /claus/cal/node3.html   (7647 words)

  
 Russian Orthodox Church of Three Saints in Garfield, NJ
In fact, astronomers cannot use the Gregorian calendar for their calculations, since it is "missing" the ten days that were "skipped" in 1583.
The issue of the Church Calendar is painful and divisive In my opinion, this fact alone is an excellent reason why the calendar reform should never have taken place, and especially in a piece-meal fashion.
Two, acceptance by all Orthodox Christians of Pope Gregory’s calendar reform, and the ensuing absurdities regarding the Apostle’s Fast and Paschal drift, as well as the acceptance of the ecumenist goals of Meletios Metaxakis and the disavowal of the decrees of three Church Councils convened to condemn such an eventuality (1583, 1587, 1593).
www.3saints.com /ch_calendar.html   (2202 words)

  
 Julian calendar   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
To make the length of the calendar year the same as that of the tropical year, every four years an extra day was to be added to Februarius between its 23 and 24 days, giving it 30 days.
The new calendar confirmed the use of the era of the founding of the city, ab urbe condita, introduced by Varro in the 1st century bce.
The use of the Christian Era with the Julian calendar did not begin until the 8th century, and then only by scholars; everyday use came centuries later.
www.sizes.com /time/cal_julian.htm   (379 words)

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