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Topic: Rhetoric


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In the News (Thu 13 Dec 18)

  
  Aristotle's Rhetoric (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)
Rhetoric and dialectic are concerned with things that do not belong to a definite genus or are not the object of a specific science.
The general idea seems to be this: Previous theorists of rhetoric gave most of their attention to methods outside the subject; they taught how to slander, how to arouse emotions in the audience, or how to distract the attention of the hearers from the subject.
However, in the rhetorical context there are two factors that the dialectician has to keep in mind if she wants to become a rhetorician too, and if the dialectical argument is to become a successful enthymeme.
plato.stanford.edu /entries/aristotle-rhetoric   (7393 words)

  
  Rhetoric - MSN Encarta
The Greek philosopher Aristotle, in his work Rhetoric, defined the function of rhetoric as being, not that of persuasion, but rather that of “discovering all the available means of persuasion,” thereby emphasizing the winning of an argument by persuasive marshaling of truth, rather than the swaying of an audience by an appeal to their emotions.
The instructors in formal rhetoric in Rome were at first Greek, and the great masters of theoretical and practical rhetoric, Cicero and Quintilian, were both influenced by Greek models.
Rhetoric constituted one of the subjects of the trivium, or three preliminary subjects of the seven liberal arts taught at the universities, the other two being grammar and logic.
encarta.msn.com /encnet/refpages/RefArticle.aspx?refid=761574514   (931 words)

  
  Rhetoric - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Rhetoric thus evolved as an important art, one that provided the orator with the forms, means, and strategies of persuading an audience of the correctness of the orator's arguments.
A Spaniard, he was appointed in 1523 to the Lectureship of Rhetoric at Oxford by Cardinal Wolsey, and was entrusted by Henry VIII to be one of the tutors of Mary.
Rhetorical theory today is as much influenced by the research results and research methods of the behavioral sciences and by theories of literary criticism as by ancient rhetorical theory.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Rhetoric   (4518 words)

  
 Introduction to The Art of Rhetoric by Sir Thomas Wilson (1524-1581)
And, second, rhetoric makes conscious use of artful (including the connotations of artifice and artificiality as well as technical mastery and verbal techne) language techniques, known collectively as "eloquence," to make its discourse enjoyable and persuasive for audiences lacking the interest or expertise to engage in strictly logical discussion.
Rhetoric and dialectical logic are essentially the same, but they differ in their appearance or form and their situational use or occasion.
Rhetoric, thus, becomes a complete literary theory for explaining and directing literary practice, provided only that literature be conceptualized as grounded in the genuine social and political and economic processes of real life.
www.people.vcu.edu /~nsharp/wilsint1.htm   (3326 words)

  
 What is Rhetoric?
The formal study of rhetoric was undertaken in ancient Greece, in approximately 500 BCE, with the establishment of schools for the purpose of teaching citizens to prepare cases for presentation in courts of law.
Rhetoric was thus early established as one of the essentials of an educational system that came to be known as the seven liberal arts, which were divided into two clusters encompassing the linguistic and the mathematical arts, known respectively as the trivium and the quadrivium.
Rhetoric is thus not limited to any particular discipline; as a method of analysis, it can be applied, for example, to political discourse, though it is not political science; to literary works, though it is not literary criticism; and to scientific discourse, though it is not science.
www.engr.usask.ca /dept/techcomm/whatis.html   (1686 words)

  
 [No title]
Rhetoric is useful (1) because things that are true and things that are just have a natural tendency to prevail over their opposites, so that if the decisions of judges are not what they ought to be, the defeat must be due to the speakers themselves, and they must be blamed accordingly.
But rhetoric we look upon as the power of observing the means of persuasion on almost any subject presented to us; and that is why we say that, in its technical character, it is not concerned with any special or definite class of subjects.
It is not true, as some writers assume in their treatises on rhetoric, that the personal goodness revealed by the speaker contributes nothing to his power of persuasion; on the contrary, his character may almost be called the most effective means of persuasion he possesses.
graduate.gradsch.uga.edu /archive/Aristotle/Rhetoric_(rhetoric).txt   (20838 words)

  
 what is
Rhetoric was thus early established as one of the essentials of an educational system that came to be known as the seven liberal arts, which were divided into two clusters encompassing the linguistic and the mathematical arts, known respectively as the trivium and the quadrivium.
Rhetoric is thus not limited to any particular discipline; as a method of analysis, it can be applied, for example, to political discourse, though it is not political science; to literary works, though it is not literary criticism; and to scientific discourse, though it is not science.
First, a rhetor needs to consider the things that the listeners value, need, hope for, fear, and so on; once the rhetor understands the things they care about, he or she can show how what the audience is asked to do is in accord with values they already hold.
engrwww.usask.ca /oldsite/dept/techcomm/whatis.html   (1718 words)

  
 TheologyWebsite.com Etext Index: Rhetoric by Aristotle   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Rhetoric is useful (1) because things that are true and things that are just have a natural tendency to prevail over their opposites, so that if the decisions of judges are not what they ought to be, the defeat must be due to the speakers themselves, and they must be blamed accordingly.
But rhetoric we look upon as the power of observing the means of persuasion on almost any subject presented to us; and that is why we say that, in its technical character, it is not concerned with any special or definite class of subjects.
It is not true, as some writers assume in their treatises on rhetoric, that the personal goodness revealed by the speaker contributes nothing to his power of persuasion; on the contrary, his character may almost be called the most effective means of persuasion he possesses.
www.theologywebsite.com /etext/aristotle/rhetoric1.shtml   (16171 words)

  
 Rhetoric - Boston College   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Aristotle wrote [The function of rhetoric is] "to see the available means of persuasion in each case." In other words, rhetorical studies attempts to locate the options available for influencing individual persons or groups of people in a variety of different situations.
Since rhetoric focuses on the means of persuasion, critics like Plato have argued that rhetoric does not aim at the greater good, and in some circumstances, Plato complains that rhetorical appeals can be highly unethical.
Instead of indicting rhetoric and chastising rhetoricians, rhetorical studies teaches students to examine persuasive events from a critical perspective, providing an analytical framework that leads to a greater appreciation and understanding of the impact of the persuasive event.
www.bc.edu /schools/cas/communication/undergrad/conc/rhetoric   (559 words)

  
 Rhetoric :: Communication : Gourt
Rhetoric is one of the three original liberal arts or trivium (the other members are dialectic and grammar) in Western culture.
As such, rhetoric is said to flourish in open and democratic societies with rights of free speech, free assembly, and political enfranchisement for some portion of the population.
Both the terms "rhetoric" and "sophistry" are also used today in a pejorative or dismissive sense, when someone wants to distinguish between "empty" words and action, or between true or accurate information and misinformation, propaganda, or "spin," or to denigrate specific forms of verbal reasoning as spurious.
science.gourt.com /Social-Sciences/Communication/Rhetoric.html   (850 words)

  
 I-Prop : Basic Concepts : Rhetoric
While attempting to define rhetoric in his book A Rhetoric of Motives, author Kenneth Burke says, “The most characteristic concern of rhetoric [is] the manipulation of men's beliefs for political ends....the basic function of rhetoric [is] the use of words by human agents to form attitudes or to induce actions in other human agents” (12).
This idea of rhetoric as being the use of words for purposes of persuasion and manipulation is probably the most prevalent connotation of the word today.
Since the author’s use of rhetoric is often intrinsic to the quality of his or her work, one may look at any piece of original literary work to see an example of rhetoric and its relation to intellectual property.
www.gwu.edu /~uw20ip/rhetoric.htm   (1100 words)

  
 CCH - The Rhetoric Stage: the Subject of Rhetoric
The degradation of this word, “rhetoric,” is undoubtedly the result of abuse, both in politics, where language becomes mere strategy and methodology, and in law, where the duty to defend a case becomes an overzealous manipulation of the truth.
But rhetoric we look upon as the power of observing the means of persuasion on almost any subject presented to us; and that is why we say that, in its technical character, it is not limited to any special or definite class of subjects.
Rhetoric used in the context of poetry produced something called “the flowers of rhetoric.” The flowers of rhetoric were beautiful, interesting, or unique turns of phrase which decorated the poetry of the time.
www.classical-homeschooling.org /rhetoric/rhetoric.html   (2689 words)

  
 Rhetoric Department
The Department of Rhetoric at Berkeley trains its majors in the history of rhetorical theory and practice, grounded in argumentation and in the analysis of the symbolic and institutional dimensions of discourse.
Rhetoric's inherent multi-disciplinary subject matter makes it an ideal major for students seeking to obtain the sort of liberal arts education that will prepare them for the diversity of careers requiring advanced critical thinking and communications skills, such as law, business, civil service, education, medicine, science, and so on.
Rhetoric majors are trained in the theory and history of rhetorical practice with a focus in one of three different areas of study -- History and Theory of Rhetoric, Public Discourse, and Narrative and Image.
rhetoric.berkeley.edu /undergraduate.html   (318 words)

  
 Rhetoric
Silva Rhetoricae: The Forest of Rhetoric provided by Dr Gideon Burton of Brigham Young University, is a guide to the terms of classical and renaissance rhetoric: definitions and examples of Greek and Latin terms, discussion of general rhetorical strategies and examples of different types of rhetorical analysis.
Rhetorical analysis does not involve simply identifying and labeling linguistic features, but an examination of the entire context of the communication: “Speech or writing never occurs in a vacuum, but in some historical, cultural, temporal setting that is intimately tied up with how one frames discourse.
Historical analogies are a rhetorical device frequently used by politicians and diplomats to strengthen their arguments or to persuade the public of their views.
www.diplomacy.edu /Language/Rhetoric/analysing.htm   (2027 words)

  
 Rhetoric Department   (Site not responding. Last check: )
All Hampden-Sydney students must pass the Rhetoric Proficiency Exam (or Rhetoric 200) before they may be graduated from the College.
See the Rhetoric Program policy on transfer students.) Students eligible to take the exam receive letters informing them of the date, time, and place of the Rhetoric Proficiency Exam; the letters also advise them to prepare for the exam with the help of the Writing Center staff.
The RPE is a three-hour essay exam which tests a student's ability to invent a reasonable and thoughtful thesis "on a subject not foreign to the student's experience" (Faculty Resolution, 1978) and to construct a reasonably logical and well-supported argument on that thesis.
www.hsc.edu /academics/rhetoric/proficiency.html   (853 words)

  
 Plato on Rhetoric and Poetry (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)
Rhetoric is “the source of freedom for humankind itself and at the same time it is for each person the source of rule over others in one's own city” (452d6-8).
That is, the rhetoric of the great palinode is markedly “poetic.” Especially noteworthy for present purposes is the fact that the theme of inspiration is repeatedly invoked in the first half of the dialogue; poetic inspiration is explicitly discussed.
The Platonic dialogue is a innovative type of rhetoric, and it is hard to believe that it does not at all reflect — whether successfully or not is another matter — Plato's response to the criticisms of writing which he puts into the mouth of his Socrates.
plato.stanford.edu /entries/plato-rhetoric   (13035 words)

  
 Project MUSE - Rhetoric & Public Affairs
Rhetoric & Public Affairs is an interdisciplinary journal devoted to the history, theory, and criticism of public discourse.
Published quarterly, the journal explores the traditional arenas of rhetorical investigation including executive leadership, diplomacy, political campaigns, judicial and legislative deliberations, and public policy debate.
Of special interest are manuscripts that explore the nexus of rhetoric, politics, and ethics-the worlds of persuasion, power, and social values as they meet in the crucible of public debate and deliberation.
muse.jhu.edu /journals/rhetoric_and_public_affairs   (93 words)

  
 fUSION Anomaly. Rhetoric
The founder of rhetoric as a science is said to be Corax of Syracuse, who in the 5th century BC composed the first handbook on the art of rhetoric.
Much as Plato originally condemned the rhetoric of the sophists for its lack of concern for truth, rhetoric now came to be associated with emptiness: it ceased to be connected with ideas.
Rhetorical theory today is much more heavily influenced by the research results and research methods of the behavioral sciences and by theories of literary criticism than by ancient Rhetorical theory.
fusionanomaly.net /rhetoric.html   (2255 words)

  
 Corax: The Crow's Nest | Rhetoric
Rhetoric in Homer, the historians, and the dramatists
Composition and Rhetoric Studies - overview of the controversies, histories, and pedagogical practices of composition and rhetoric.
Rhetoric - introduction to the study of rhetoric, from Aristotle to the present, with emphasis on rhetorical and stylistic analyses of various types of discourse.
www.u.arizona.edu /~tkinney/resources/rhetoric.html   (429 words)

  
 Calvin College - CAS - Programs: Rhetoric and Communication
The study of rhetoric and communication is anchored in the liberal-arts.
Emphasis is given to rhetorical and discussion methods to help students learn about analyzing and constructing oral and written arguments and to work cooperatively doing a research project for class presentation.
Rhetoric provides one important means by which to create community and to enter into public life.
www.calvin.edu /academic/cas/programs/rhetcomm.htm   (2008 words)

  
 the canons of rhetoric
Rhetorical treatises through the centuries have been set up in light of these five categories, although memory and delivery consistently have received less attention.
Although the five canons of rhetoric describe areas of attention in rhetorical pedagogy, these should not be taken as the only educational template for the discipline of rhetoric.
Treatises on rhetoric also discuss at some length the roots or sources of rhetorical ability, and specific kinds of rhetorical exercises intended to promote linguistic facility.
rhetoric.byu.edu /Canons/Canons.htm   (273 words)

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