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In the News (Sat 20 Jul 19)

  
 Encyclopedia: Richard II of England
Richard II (January 6, 1367– February 14, 1400) was the son of Edward the Black Prince, Prince of Wales, and Joan "The Fair Maid of Kent".
Richard II, born in 1367, was the son of Edward, the Black Prince and Joan, the Fair Maid of Kent.
Richard also lacked the thirst for battle of his grandfather: his Scottish campaign in 1385 was not decisive, and he signed a 28-year truce with France in 1396 which was hugely unpopular at home in spite of the dividends that peace brought to the kingdom.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Richard-II-of-England   (6419 words)

  
 Richard III of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Richard III (2 October 1452– 22 August 1485) was the King of England from 1483 until his death and the last king from the House of York.
Richard was born at Fotheringay Castle, the fourth surviving son of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York (who had been a strong claimant to the throne of King Henry VI) and Cecily Neville.
Despite rumours that Richard's claims were true, evidence was lacking, and until recently it has generally been accepted that Richard's chief motive for taking the crown was that he felt that his own power and wealth would be threatened under Edward V, who was presumably sympathetic to his Woodville relatives.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Richard_III_of_England   (3249 words)

  
 Richard I of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Richard's bowels were buried at the foot of the tower from which the shot was loosed, his heart was buried at Rouen, while the rest of his remains were buried next to his father at Fontevraud Abbey near Chinon and Saumur, France.
Richard officially proclaimed his nephew, the son of Geoffrey, Arthur of Brittany, as his heir, and Tancred promised to later marry one of his daughters to Arthur when he came of age (Arthur was only four years old at the time).
Richard was a younger maternal half-brother of Marie de Champagne and Alix of France.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Richard_I_of_England   (3249 words)

  
 Richard III of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Richard III (2 October 1452 – 22 August 1485) was the King of England from 1483 until his death and the last king from the House of York.
Despite rumours that Richard's claims were true, evidence was lacking, and until recently it has generally been accepted that Richard's chief motive for taking the crown was that he felt that his own power and wealth would be threatened under Edward V, who was presumably sympathetic to his Woodville relatives.
Richard was born at Fotheringay Castle, the fourth son of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York (who had been a strong claimant to the throne of King Henry VI) and Cecily Neville.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Richard_III_of_England   (3249 words)

  
 Richard II (play) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Richard II is a play written by William Shakespeare around 1595 and based on the life of King Richard II of England.
The historical parallels in the succession of Richard II may have been intended as political comment on the contemporary situation, with the weak Richard II analogous to Queen Elizabeth and an implicit argument in favour of her replacement by a monarch capable of creating a stable dynasty.
After that, Bolingbroke's father, John of Gaunt, dies and Richard II seizes all of his land and money.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Richard_II_(play)   (1322 words)

  
 Edward IV of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Edward was born on April 28, 1442, at Rouen in France, the eldest son of Richard, Duke of York (a leading claimant to the throne of England) and Cecily Neville.
Although his son was quickly barred from the throne and succeeded by Richard of Gloucester, Edward IV's daughter, Elizabeth of York, later became the Queen consort of Henry VII of England.
Edward IV ( April 28, 1442 – April 9, 1483) was King of England from March 4, 1461 to April 9, 1483, with a break of a few months in the period 1470 - 1471.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Edward_IV_of_England   (1322 words)

  
 King Richard IV of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
King Richard IV of England was a fictional character in the first series of the BBC comedy series The Black Adder, played by Brian Blessed.
The character is loosely based on Prince Richard, Duke of York ( 1473 - 1483?), son of Edward IV, brother to Edward V, who was, it is believed, murdered to the political benefit of his uncle, Richard III in 1483.
He was actually similar to Henry VIII with his large red beard, desire to disestablish the church and his massive appetite (at one point he is seen to eat the back end of a horse).
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Richard_IV_of_England   (1322 words)

  
 Richard IV of England
Richard IV of England is a fictional king in the comedy Blackadder, corresponding to the real life Richard, Duke of York.
www.ceca.de /encyclopedia/r/ri/richard_iv_of_england.html   (1322 words)

  
 Richard III (play) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It is perhaps strange that in presenting the cycle of vengeance Shakespeare omitted the fact that the real-life Richard himself had a son who died prematurely, which some contemporary historians viewed as divine retribution for the fate of Edward's sons--which of course Margaret would claim as retribution for the fate of her son.
Richard's language and undertones of self-remorse seem to indicate that, in the final hour, he is repentant for his evil deeds, however, it is too late.
Richard III is the culmination of the cycle of "Wars of the Roses" plays.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Richard_III_(play)   (2019 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Richard I, King of England
Richard was induced to surrender England to the Emperor (as John a few years later was to make over England to the Holy See), and then Henry conferred the kingdom upon his captive as a fief at the Diet of Mainz, in Feb., 1194 (see Bloch, "Forschungen", Appendix IV).
But other quarrels followed between Richard and his father, and it was in the heat of the most desperate of these, in which the astuteness of Philip Augustus had contrived to implicate Henry's favourite son John, that the old King died broken-hearted, 6 July, 1189.
Richard I, born at Oxford, 6 Sept, 1157; died at Chaluz, France, 6 April, 1199; was known to the minstrels of a later age, rather than to his contemporaries, as "Coeur-de-Lion".
www.newadvent.org /cathen/13041b.htm   (2019 words)

  
 Richard II of England
Richard II (January 6?, 1367 - February 14, 1400) was the son of Edward the Black Prince, Prince of Wales, and Joan "The Fair Maid of Kent".
Out of the fact that Richard was born at Epiphany and that three kings were present at his birth came a legend that, despite being a second son, he was destined for great things.
Richard is said to have been devoted to her.
mywiseowl.com /articles/Richard_II_of_England   (2019 words)

  
 History Bookshop.com: Richard I, King of England
Richard was the third son of Henry II and Eleanor.
England was taxed again and again by Richard's chancellor, William de Longchamp, and his efforts resulted in the payment of the ransom and Richard's release.
Richard is often viewed as a legendary figure in English history: his romantic and dynamic image have caught the imagination, as have his brave and chivalrous exploits as a soldier throughout Europe and the Holy Lands.
www.historybookshop.com /articles/people/monarchs/richard-1.asp   (2019 words)

  
 King Richard I - The Lionheart The Knights Templar templarhistory.com
Richard Plantagenet came into the world September 8th in the year 1157 AD Although born in Oxfordshire England, Richard was a child of Aquitaine a part of Southern France.
While Richard Plantagenet is revered as one of the great warrior kings of England, he is perhaps best known as "the absent king." This is due to the fact that during his reign from 1189-1199, he spent a total of six months in England.
At the age of fourteen, Richard was named the Duke of Aquitane in the church of St. Hillaire at Poitiers which was one of the lands made homage to the French King.
www.templarhistory.com /richard.html   (2019 words)

  
 Britannia: Monarchs of Britain
Richard II, born in 1367, was the son of Edward, the Black Prince and Joan, the Fair Maid of Kent.
Richard was but ten years old when he succeeded his grandfather, Edward III; England was ruled by a council under the leadership of John of Gaunt, and Richard was tutored by Sir Simon Burley.
Richard travelled to Ireland in 1399 to quell warring chieftains, allowing Bolingboke to return to England and be elected king by Parliament.
www.britannia.com /history/monarchs/mon33.html   (2019 words)

  
 Richard I of England - Simple English Wikipedia
Richard I of England (September 8, 1157– April 6, 1199) was the son of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine.
This short article needs someone to make it better.
simple.wikipedia.org /wiki/Richard_I_of_England   (2019 words)

  
 History of the Monarchy > The Plantagenets > Richard II
Richard took his revenge in 1397, arresting or banishing many of his opponents; his cousin, Henry of Bolingbroke, was also subsequently banished.
Risings in support of Richard led to his murder in Pontefract Castle; Henry V subsequently had his body buried in Westminster Abbey.
Richard pursued policies of peace with France (his second wife was Isabella of Valois); Richard still called himself king of France and refused to give up Calais, but his reign was concurrent with a 28 year truce in the Hundred Years War.
www.royal.gov.uk /output/Page67.asp   (447 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Richard I, King of England
Richard was induced to surrender England to the Emperor (as John a few years later was to make over England to the Holy See), and then Henry conferred the kingdom upon his captive as a fief at the Diet of Mainz, in Feb., 1194 (see Bloch, "Forschungen", Appendix IV).
But other quarrels followed between Richard and his father, and it was in the heat of the most desperate of these, in which the astuteness of Philip Augustus had contrived to implicate Henry's favourite son John, that the old King died broken-hearted, 6 July, 1189.
Richard I, born at Oxford, 6 Sept, 1157; died at Chaluz, France, 6 April, 1199; was known to the minstrels of a later age, rather than to his contemporaries, as "Coeur-de-Lion".
www.newadvent.org /cathen/13041b.htm   (1540 words)

  
 TimeRef - History Timelines
The marriage of Richard II and the seven or eight year-old daughter of Charles VI, King of France was arranged.
Bolingbroke should have inherited the lands from his father, John of Gaunt, but Richard had other ideas.
Richard, the son of Edward the Black Prince, and grandson of Edward III, became king.
www.btinternet.com /~timeref/hstt55.htm   (1611 words)

  
 Richard II by William Shakespeare: A searchable online version at The Literature Network
Consequently, Richard II flees to Flint Castle with Aumerle, the Earl of Salisbury, Sir Stephen Scroop, and Bishop Carlisle.
Richard II is ordered by Henry IV (Bol.) to go to Northern England and Richard's wife (the Queen) is ordered to return to her native France.
Edmund's (York's) son the Duke of Aumerle helps Richard II defend the crown, gaining courage from the hope that Heaven will support the "right", since Richard II feels he is the rightful King of England.
www.online-literature.com /shakespeare/richardII   (1859 words)

  
 Here is a sample annotated bibliography for Richard II
Richard’s speech about sad stories on the death of kings is reminiscent of Chaucer’s “Monk’s Tale.” Language reflects the contrast of two ways of life—the old order of the Plantagenants to the newer order of Henry IV.
In Richard II the use of language is still conventional, showing Shakespeare’s affection for words for their own sake, not yet achieving the expressionism of meaning through a single bold metaphor as will be achieved later.
Cubeta reminds us that when Richard II was written, Elizabeth I was within six years of her death in 1603, and she had been queen for thirty-four years, and she had not married nor produced or designated an heir, creating fear over her succession.
daphne.palomar.edu /CHRISTINE/e250/Richard2/annbibrichard2.htm   (2077 words)

  
 King Richard II
Richard II, King of England, younger son of Edward the Black Prince by Joan "the Fair Maid of Kent", was born at Bordeaux on the 6th of January 1367.
When Richard lost his crown in 1399 Isabella was captured by Henry IV's partisans and sent to Sonning, near Reading, while her father, Charles VI, asked in vain for the restoration of his daughter and of her dowry.
Richard's second queen, Isabella (1389-1409), was born in Paris on the 9th of November 1389, and was married to the English king at Calais in October, or November, 1396, but on account of the bride's youth the marriage was never consummated.
www.nndb.com /people/704/000093425   (1488 words)

  
 DragonBear History: All That: Richard II
Richard was crowned king at the age of 10 on the death of his grandfather, Edward III (1377), and a council of regents was appointed to rule until he came of age.
In 1399, John of Gaunt- Duke of Lancaster, Richard's uncle, the most powerful magnate in England, and sole source of political stability in the government - died; Gaunt's son and heir (and Richard's cousin), Henry Bolingbroke, was living abroad as one of the banished Lords Appellant.
In the First Middle Ages, Richard II of England "expressly said...that his laws were in his own mouth or, occasionally, in his own breast" - that is, not just that the King's word was the law, but sometimes his unspoken thought.
www.dragonbear.com /richard2.html   (1412 words)

  
 (Richard - Robert II )
Richard III (Duke of Normandy) (____ - 1027)
Richard I "Coeur (King of England) (1157 - 1199)
Richard I the (Duke of Normandy) (____ - 0996)
home.comcast.net /~smcdonald91/genealogy/index/ind0035.html   (155 words)

  
 History of ENGLAND
The history plays of William Shakespeare concentrate on a span of about ninety years from the end of the reign of Richard II to the seizing of the crown by Henry VII.
Meanwhile, in June 1483, the duke of Gloucester is proclaimed by a parliament at Westminster as Richard III.
The boy is crowned Henry VI of England at Westminster in 1429, and Henry II of France in Paris in 1431.
www.historyworld.net /wrldhis/PlainTextHistories.asp?groupid=2968&HistoryID=ac72   (1285 words)

  
 Henry IV, king of England. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
In 1387 he joined the opposition to King Richard II led by his uncle, Thomas of Woodstock, duke of Gloucester, and became one of the five “lords appellant” who ruled England in 1388–89.
Early in 1400, supporters of Richard II rebelled, but the revolt was easily suppressed and most of its leaders were subsequently executed.
A rebellion of 1405 in the north was crushed, and the leaders, among them Richard Le Scrope, archbishop of York, were executed; Henry was severely criticized for their deaths.
www.bartleby.com /65/he/Henry4Eng.html   (1285 words)

  
 Richard Cromwell
Richard Cromwell ( October 4 1626 - July 12 1712) was the third son of Oliver Cromwell and was Lord Protector of England Scotland and Ireland for little over eight months from September 3 1658 until May 25 1659.
This was the beginning of a period of restoration of the Commonwealth of England but led to a state of that resulted in the return of the King Charles II of England and the English Restoration.
Unlike his father Richard was not accountable for the death of King Charles I.
www.freeglossary.com /Richard_Cromwell   (1285 words)

  
 Britannia: Monarchs of Britain
Richard was but ten years old when he succeeded his grandfather, Edward III; England was ruled by a council under the leadership of John of Gaunt, and Richard was tutored by Sir Simon Burley.
Richard II, born in 1367, was the son of Edward, the Black Prince and Joan, the Fair Maid of Kent.
Richard travelled to Ireland in 1399 to quell warring chieftains, allowing Bolingboke to return to England and be elected king by Parliament.
britannia.com /history/monarchs/mon33.html   (1285 words)

  
 History of the Monarchy > The Lancastrians > Henry IV
Exiled for life by Richard II in 1399, Henry's successful usurpation did not lead to general recognition of his claim (he remained unrecognised as King by Charles VI of France).
An outbreak of the plague in 1400 was accompanied by a revolt in Wales led by Owen Glendower.
Henry IV spent much of the early part of his reign fighting to keep control of his lands.
www.royal.gov.uk /output/Page52.asp   (1285 words)

  
 Richard Neville 16th Earl Of Warwick
He was the richest man in England outside the royal family, and he used his wealth and power to help depose the " Lancastrian " Henry VI in favor of the " Yorkist " Edward IV, and then later to place Henry VI back on the throne.
Warwick was the eldest son of Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury and Alice Montagu, Countess of Salisbury.
Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick ( 1428 - April 14, 1471) is better known as "Warwick the Kingmaker".
www.wikiverse.org /richard-neville-16th-earl-of-warwick   (1285 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Richard III of England
Richard of Shrewsbury, 1st Duke of York and 1st Duke of Norfolk (17 August 1473–1483?) was the second son of King Edward IV of England and Elizabeth Woodville and, thus, the younger brother of King Edward V. In January 1478, when he was about 4 years old, he married...
Tower of London (1939) is an American film, starring Basil Rathbone and Boris Karloff, about King Richard III of England and the Princes in the Tower, set in the Tower of London.
The Princes in the Tower Edward V of England (1470–1483?) and Richard of Shrewsbury, 1st Duke of York, (1473–1483?) were the two young princes, sons of Edward IV of England and Elizabeth Woodville, who were declared illegitimate by the Act of Parliament known as Titulus Regius.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Richard-III-of-England   (1285 words)

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