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Topic: Richter scale


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In the News (Fri 16 Aug 19)

  
  The Severity of an Earthquake
Richter of the California Institute of Technology as a mathematical device to compare the size of earthquakes.
The Richter Scale is not used to express damage.
This scale, composed of 12 increasing levels of intensity that range from imperceptible shaking to catastrophic destruction, is designated by Roman numerals.
pubs.usgs.gov /gip/earthq4/severitygip.html   (1578 words)

  
 Richter Magnitude
Charles F. Richter's most valuable contributions was to recognize that the seismic waves radiated by all earthquakes can provide good estimates of their magnitudes.
Richter showed that, the larger the intrinsic energy of the earthquake, the larger the amplitude of ground motion at a given distance.
He calibrated his scale of magnitudes using measured maximum amplitudes of shear waves on seismometers particularly sensitive to shear waves with periods of about one second.
www.seismo.unr.edu /ftp/pub/louie/class/100/magnitude.html   (1477 words)

  
  Hough, S.E.: Richter's Scale: Measure of an Earthquake, Measure of a Man.
By developing the scale that bears his name, Charles Richter not only invented the concept of magnitude as a measure of earthquake size, he turned himself into nothing less than a household word.
Drawing on the wealth of papers Richter left behind, as well as dozens of interviews with his family and colleagues, Susan Hough takes the reader deep into Richter's complex life story, setting it in the context of his family and interpersonal attachments, his academic career, and the history of seismology.
Among his colleagues Richter was known as intensely private, passionately interested in earthquakes, and iconoclastic.
press.princeton.edu /titles/8248.html   (655 words)

  
  Richter Scale - Search Results - MSN Encarta   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Richter Scale, method of ranking the strength or size of an earthquake.
The Richter scale is based on measurement of seismic waves, used to determine the magnitude of an earthquake at its epicenter.
- scale for measuring earthquakes: a scale from 1 to 10 used to measure the severity of earthquakes according to the amount of energy released, with a higher number indicating stronger tremors.
encarta.msn.com /Richter_Scale.html   (185 words)

  
 Richter magnitude scale Summary
Richter measured ground movement with a seismograph and calculated the magnitude based on the height of the waves on the seismogram (the paper record).
It is a base-10 logarithmic scale obtained by calculating the logarithm of the combined horizontal amplitude of the largest displacement from zero on a seismometer output.
Richter arbitrarily chose a magnitude 0 event to be an earthquake that would show a maximum combined horizontal displacement of 1 micrometre on a seismogram recorded using a Wood-Anderson torsion seismometer 100 km from the earthquake epicenter.
www.bookrags.com /Richter_magnitude_scale   (2525 words)

  
  ipedia.com: Richter magnitude scale Article   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Richter's local magnitude scale was originally intended to be used only in a particular study area in California, and on seismograms recorded on a particular instrument, the Wood-Anderson torsion seismometer.
Richter magnitude is a logarithmic scale obtained by calculating the logarithm of the combined horizontal amplitude of the largest displacement from zero on a seismogram.
Richter's motivation for creating the local magnitude scale was to separate the vastly larger number of smaller earthquakes from the relatively fewer larger earthquakes observed in California at the time.
www.ipedia.com /richter_magnitude_scale_1.html   (0 words)

  
 Richter scale - Uncyclopedia
However, Richter's scale fell off the table it was sitting on during the great earthquake of San Francisco and broke due to the impact.
Hearst, an unemployed hobo, was surprised by the donation, but still bore the scars of the loss of his own beloved piece of meat, Roastbeef, which had been condemned by health inspectors and destroyed during the Great Botulism Rush of '49, so he took the cash and became a newspaper proprietor.
Richter's scale was never forgotten: from that moment on, every time an earthquake shatters the earth, everybody in the world remembers the Richter scale.
uncyclopedia.org /wiki/Richter_scale   (0 words)

  
 What is the richter scale?
The Richter Scale measures the magnitude of an earthquake.
Charles Richter and Beno Gutenberg developed the scale in 1935 and it was originally intended to be used only in a particular study area in California, and on seismograms recorded on a particular instrument, the Wood-Anderson torsion seismometer.
Richter arbitrarily chose a magnitude 0 event to be an earthquake that would show a maximum combined horizontal displacement of 1 micrometre on a seismograph recording for every 100 km the seismometer was from the earthquake epicenter.
www.essortment.com /hobbies/richterscale_tsjm.htm   (790 words)

  
 Charles F. Richter Biography | Encyclopedia of World Biography
Charles F. Richter (1900-1985) was one of the developers of the Richter Scale which is used to measure the magnitude of earthquakes.
Richter chose to use the term "magnitude" to describe an earthquake's strength because of his early interest in astronomy; stargazers use the word to describe the brightness of stars.
Richter did not seem concerned that Gutenberg's name was not included at first; but in later years, after Gutenberg was already dead, Richter began to insist that his colleague be recognized for expanding the scale to apply to earthquakes all over the globe, not just in southern California.
www.bookrags.com /biography/charles-f-richter   (1764 words)

  
 - Earthquake - Richter Scale
The seismograph that Charles Richter used to invent his scale in 1935 was one kind, adjusted one way.
Richter worked in California, where earthquakes are shallow (less than 10 miles deep), and near (less than 350 miles from seismograph).
That is four meters, or 4,000 millimeters, or 6.6 on the Richter scale.
members.tripod.com /~jeffbower/richter.html   (459 words)

  
 Richter Scale: World of Earth Science
His system of measurement, called the Richter scale, was based on his studies of earthquakes in southern California.
Richter measured ground movement with a seismograph, compared the reading to others taken at various distances from the epicenter, then calculated an average magnitude from all reports.
Today the modified Mercalli scale is often used in combination with the Richter scale because both methods are helpful in gauging the total impact of an earthquake.
science.enotes.com /earth-science/richter-scale   (395 words)

  
 Teaching Treasures richter scale project   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Richter scale is a measurement using the numbers 1 to 12 to express the magnitude of earthquakes.
This scale was named after a man named Charles Robert Richter but he also had a working partner who's name was Beno Gutenberg, both men were American seismologists.
Each number on the scale refers to the magnitude of an earth tremor or earthquake as a logarithmic expression of the amount of energy released during the tremor.
teachingtreasures.com.au /sciencenames/richter_scale.htm   (73 words)

  
 Richter scale
Quantitative scale of earthquake magnitude based on the measurement of seismic waves, used to indicate the magnitude of an earthquake at its epicentre.
The Richter scale is logarithmic, so an earthquake of 6.0 is ten times greater than one of 5.0.
The magnitude of an earthquake differs from its intensity, measured by the Mercalli scale, which is qualitative and varies from place to place for the same earthquake.
www.tiscali.co.uk /reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0007810.html   (0 words)

  
 The Richter Scale: What It Is And What It Measures   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Introduced in 1935, the scale is named for American physicist Charles F. Richter of the California Institute of Technology, who evolved it from patterns he discovered by studying more than 200 earthquakes a year.
The Richter scale is a more objective, quantitative basis of measuring earthquakes than the other widely-used standard, the 12-point Mercalli scale, the U.S. Geological Survey says.
The Richter scale does not measure an earthquake's effects, but gives its strength in terms of the energy released, as measured by seismographs.
virtual.yosemite.cc.ca.us /jtolhurst/ESGIS/Earth_Science/quake_richter_dc_2.html   (0 words)

  
 The Richter Magnitude Scale, Alaska Science Forum
Magnitude scales in general often seem to be devised with a devilish intent to mislead.
It's a fairly common occurrence for visitors at the Geophysical Institute's seismology laboratory to ask if they can see the Richter scale as if it were a piece of equipment, but on that request we have to disappoint them.
At the other end of the scale, a Richter magnitude could be assigned to an earthquake of any size, no matter how great, but the largest earthquakes ever recorded have not exceeded about magnitude 9.
www.gi.alaska.edu /ScienceForum/ASF7/701.html   (800 words)

  
 H e a r t l a n d S c i e n c e - - The Ohio Academy of Science -
The Richter magnitude is calculated from the amplitude of the largest seismic wave recorded for the earthquake.
This means that for each single number of increase on the scale the amplitude of motion of the ground increases tenfold.
The 1906 San Francisco earthquake was measured as 7.8 on the Richter scale.
www.heartlandscience.org /medhs/richter.htm   (0 words)

  
 richter scale
The Richter scale, used to measure earthquake intensity, was developed in 1953 by Charles Richter.
IT measures an earthquake's magnitude (intensity) on a scale of 1 to 8.8 which means that each whole number on the scale represents a 10-fold increase in power.
The difference in time between the first and second (primary and secondary) waves is measured, and another factor is added (which takes into account the fact that the waves become weaker as they travel away from the focus) to determine the magnitude of the earthquake.
library.thinkquest.org /22360/richter.html   (108 words)

  
 The Trekkie nudist behind the Richter scale   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Richter, it turns out, was also an avid nudist, a frustrated but prolific poet, a Trekkie, a devoted backpacker profiled in the pages of Field and Stream, and a philandering spouse who was quite possibly in love with his sister and whose globe-trotting wife may have been a lesbian.
Richter's scale was a first -- important in that it provided seismologists with a standardized means of measuring earthquakes where there was none -- but hardly the last word.
Developed when Richter was in his mid-30s, it established him as a leader in his adopted field (his doctorate was in physics), but Richter's most celebrated accomplishment was plagued by questions of whether he deserved full credit for it.
www.sfgate.com /cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/01/21/RVG8CNHARA1.DTL&feed=rss.books   (969 words)

  
 Richter Scale, etc.
In 1935, Charles Richter was looking for a simple way to categorize earthquakes by the energy they release, rather than subjective descriptions of their impacts on human settlements.
Because the energy at a given frequency is related to the size of the fault that produced the earthquake, the scale tends to 'saturate' when an earthquake reaches a certain size.
That's why a new magnitude scale was developed in the 1980's; the moment-magnitude scale relies on the lowest seismic frequencies, which are most sensitive to the scale of the earthquake-producing fault.
amos.indiana.edu /library/scripts/richter.html   (251 words)

  
 Richter Scale and Exponential Functions
The Richter Scale is a logarithmic function that uses the common base, 10.
Because the Richter Scale uses a base of 10 each increase of 1 in the strength of an earthquake on the Richter Scale means that there is 10 times as much ground movement.
The weakest earthquake commonly felt is a 3 on the Richter Scale.
www.nwic.edu /tenrm/spring2001/Richter.htm   (886 words)

  
 Richter magnitude scale: earthquakes: office of emergency management: departments: City of Fort Collins
His method, known as the "Richter Magnitude Scale" uses a scientific logarithm to determine the magnitude of an earthquake by measuring the acceleration of the ground during a shock.
The Richter Scale, as it is now widely known, is an open-ended scale.
The interesting thing about the Richter Scale is that for each incremental rating of one that an earthquake scores, its strength or energy is actually multiplied by a factor of 10.
www.fcgov.com /oem/richter-scale.php   (282 words)

  
 Richter Scale and Mercalli Scale
The strength of an earthquake is usually measured on one of two scales, the Modified Mercalli Scale and the Richter Scale.
He took the existing Mercalli scale and tried to add a 'scientific' scale based on accurate measurements that could be recorded by seismographs (instruments used to measure vibration) regardless of their global location.
The Richter scale for earthquake measurements is logarithmic.
www.geography-site.co.uk /pages/physical/earth/richt.html   (0 words)

  
 Richter's Scale: Measure of an Earthquake, Measure of a Man Natural History - Find Articles
The expected answer is one measured by Richter's scale of magnitudes, even though its scientific usefulness has largely been superseded by more modern standards.
Richter, you see, left seemingly everything he ever wrote to the Caltech archives--perhaps in anticipation that one day a biographer would tackle the task of putting his life in order.
She strongly suggests that Richter suffered from Asperger's syndrome, a mild form of autism, which could account for both his ability to concentrate on details and his difficulty in connecting with people.
findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_m1134/is_1_116/ai_n17216514   (615 words)

  
 The Richter Scale - www.on-this-day.com   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Richter magnitude scale was developed in 1935 by Charles F. Richter of the California Institute of Technology.
On the Richter Scale, the magnitude of quake is expressed in whole numbers and decimal fractions.
The Richter Scale is not used to express damage.
www.on-this-day.com /onthisday/docs/assorted/richterscale.htm   (161 words)

  
 UALR Arkansas Earthquake Center - Richter Scale, Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale, Moment Magnitude Scale,   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Richter magnitude scale was developed in 1935 by Charles F. Richter of the California Institute of Technology as a mathematical device to compare the size of earthquakes.
On the Richter Scale, magnitude is expressed in whole numbers and decimal fractions.
Because of the logarithmic basis of the scale, each whole number increase in magnitude represents a tenfold increase in measured amplitude; as an estimate of energy, each whole number step in the magnitude scale corresponds to the release of about 31 times more energy than the amount associated with the preceding whole number value.
quake.ualr.edu /public/richter.htm   (487 words)

  
 Earthquakes and Richter Scale - Weather
When earthquakes are reported, their intensity is given a number on the Richter Scale.
The Richter Scale was a much more objective measurement of the vibrations of the earth.
The Richter Scale goes from 0, with no vibration at all, to 10, which is higher than any known earthquake.
www.bellaonline.com /articles/art27151.asp   (307 words)

  
 Richter Scale Explained   (Site not responding. Last check: )
This scale is quantitative and based on the amount of energy released by an earthquake.
The Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale is a qualitative assessment of the kinds of damage done by an earthquake.
To avoid confusion with the Richter Magnitude scale, the Mercalli scale is reported using Roman Numerals on a scale from I to XII.
www.geology.wisc.edu /courses/g115/quake/richter.html   (0 words)

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