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Topic: River Wye


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In the News (Sat 20 Jul 19)

  
  Aspen Wye River Conference Centers - Marriot Conference Centers
The site, sections of which were once known as the Wye Plantation, was donated to the Aspen Institute by Mr.
William Paca, a signee of the Declaration of Independence and third governor of Maryland, maintained his family estate here and a monument to his memory stands near the Houghton House.
At Aspen Wye River, ideas have been known to flow as easily as the river.
www.aspenwyeriver.com /conference.asp   (323 words)

  
  River Wye: Waterscape.com
The river that defined the 'cult of the picturesque', the Wye carves its way through stunning borderland scenery attracting canoeists, sight-seers and walkers in equal measure.
The River Wye is born on the slopes of Plynlimon and carves its way through mid-Wales and the Marches until it reaches the River Severn 153 miles later.
Wye trows (similar to the types of boats found on the River Severn), group-pulled boats, fishing boats, coracles and even a steam tug have come down this river.
www.waterscape.com /River_Wye   (222 words)

  
  NationMaster - Encyclopedia: River Wye   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Newtown (Welsh: Y Drenewydd) is a town with a population of 10,542 (1993) lying on the River Severn in mid Wales.
The River Avon or Avon is a river in or adjoining the counties of Leicestershire, Northamptonshire, Warwickshire, Worcestershire and Gloucestershire in the midlands of England.
The River Nene is a river in the east of England.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/River-Wye   (3208 words)

  
 River Wye - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Wye itself is a Site of Special Scientific Interest and one of the most important rivers in the UK for nature conservation.
The Wye is largely unpolluted and is therefore considered one of the best rivers for salmon fishing in the United Kingdom, outside of Scotland.
A viewpoint near The Biblins on the Wye is known as 'Three counties view' as it is the meeting place of the counties of Herefordshire, Gloucestershire and Monmouthshire.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/River_Wye   (638 words)

  
 River Wye (disambiguation) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
River Wye, a river flowing from Axe Edge Moor, Buxton to the River Derwent
Wye River, New Zealand, a minor river in the South Island of New Zealand
Wye River, a tourist village on the west coast of Victoria, Australia
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Wye_River   (156 words)

  
 Derbyshire Rivers - River Wye in Derbyshire England
Derbyshire Rivers - River Wye in Derbyshire England
The River Wye rises on Axe Edge above Buxton and flows in a south easterly direction through Buxton and Bakewell to join the Derwent at Rowsley, 15 miles later.
The river Wye widens into a broad river valley leading to Bakewell where it passes beneath an 13th century bridge with 5 gothic arches before passing Haddon Hall and joining the river Lathkill before flowing on to Rowsley and the junction with the Derwent.
www.derbyshireuk.net /river_wye.html   (374 words)

  
 The River Wye - the major tributary of the Derwent
The River Wye rises in Buxton and flows east via magnificent gorge scenery and limestone dales to reach the River Derwent at Rowsley
The River Wye is the major river of the western part of the Peak, rising on Axe Edge above Buxton (as do the Rivers Dove and Manifold, all within the space of a few kilometres) and flowing eastwards through Buxton and Bakewell to join the Derwent at Rowsley.
At the end of Ashwood Dale the road leaves the river because the Wye enters Cheedale, with steep cliffs on either side and sections where the lower valley is often difficult to even walk along.
www.cressbrook.co.uk /features/wye.php   (498 words)

  
 Limestone Gorge: Wye Dale   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The River Wye, a major tributary of the Derwent, flows west to east from Buxton to Rowsley and maintains a continuous flow of water across the limestone outcrop.
The river originates on the impermeable strata at the margins of the limestone west of Buxton and it is this headwater flow which sustains the river course across the limestone bedrock.
It is likely that the river cut down into the bedrock in response to a lowering of sea levels during the ice age.
www.bgs.ac.uk /foundation-web/Wye_Dale.html   (218 words)

  
 wye tour   (Site not responding. Last check: )
However, once the Railway was extended further to Monmouth, the Wye Tour gradually fell into decline as rail travel became a more comfortable and convenient mode of transport - with the vast majority of the route visible from the comfort of a railway carriage.
However, even these trips were always subject to the fluctuating river levels and eventually declined in the early 20th century and the Wilton Castle II retired to rot, moored beside the riverbank.
River cruises were reintroduced for a few years in the early 1990's following a short route from the Hope and Anchor up to the Rowing Club then downstream to Wilton Bridge and back again.
www.wyevalley.fsworld.co.uk /wye_tour.htm   (775 words)

  
 Fishing   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Wye, long regarded as the premier salmon river of England, has, like many other rivers in the UK, suffered a reduction in the runs of salmon, particularly the early multi sea winter fish or ‘Springers’ as the deep bodied portmanteau fish are called.
The River Lugg which joins the Wye at Mordiford, is a much smaller river although it holds a similar pattern of fish to the main river.
Below Hay the Wye would not be classed as a trout river due to the nature of the water, although there are large numbers of trout in the river and there are numerous runs where trout will come to the fly.
www.theriverwye.co.uk /newpage2.htm   (3006 words)

  
 Wye Island Natural Resources Management Area
Wye Island NRMA is located in the tidal recesses of the Chesapeake Bay between the Wye River and the Wye East River.
Wye Island NRMA has two handicapped accessible waterfowl blinds that were donated to DNR through a Boy Scouts of America Eagle Scout project.
Wye Island is a popular destination for boaters looking for a quiet cove to anchor for the night or weekend.
www.dnr.state.md.us /publiclands/eastern/wyeisland.html   (1867 words)

  
 River Wye   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Wye itself is a Site of Special Scientific Interest and one of the most important rivers in Britain fornature conservation.
The Wye is largely unpolluted and is therefore considered one of the bestrivers for salmon fishing in Britain,outside of Scotland.
A viewpoint near The Biblins on the Wye is known as 'Threecounties view' as it is the meeting place of the counties of Herefordshire, Gloucestershire and Monmouthshire.
www.therfcc.org /river-wye-175223.html   (218 words)

  
 ECN Freshwater Site - River Wye
The River Wye itself is a Site of Special Scientific Interest and one of the most important rivers in Britain in nature conservation terms.
The surface water in the Wye and its tributaries is mostly unpolluted, so much of it is suitable as a source of drinking water and for supporting a salmon and trout fishery.
The biological quality of the river is generally good and supports several rare or scarce species including the mayfly Potamanthus luteus, the freshwater pearl mussel Margaritifera margaritifera and the native crayfish.
www.ecn.ac.uk /sites/wye.html   (253 words)

  
 River Wye   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Its source is in the Welsh mountains at Plynlimon at 741 m above sea level.
The Wye itself is a Site of Special Scientific Interest and one of the most important rivers in Britain for nature conservation.
The Wye is largely unpolluted and is therefore considered one of the best rivers for salmon fishing in Britain, outside of Scotland.
bopedia.com /en/wikipedia/r/ri/river_wye.html   (231 words)

  
 Bridge Over the River Wye   (Site not responding. Last check: )
However, in the Wye memorandum, these (Israeli) priorities were reversed, and the issue of redeployment was dealt with first, with 10% of West Bank land to be returned to Palestinian control, and another 3% being designated as a nature preserve.
For their part, Palestinian opponents of the Wye memorandum refuse it on the basis of the Israeli promotion of it as "land for security", thereby ignoring the terms of agreement of the peace process, which are UN Resolutions 224 and 338, along with the principle of land for peace.
The planners and implementors of this attack do not see that the Wye memorandum is positive in that it liberates more land, frees more Palestinian prisoners, and improves the lives of Palestinians by making possible the opening of the Palestinian airport and a free passage between Gaza and the West Bank.
www.fateh.net /e_editor/98/311098.htm   (1600 words)

  
 Canoeing On The River Wye Resources   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The River Wye has its source on Mount Plynlimmon in Wales; it then follows a winding course for 135 miles finally emptying itself into the River Severn...
The river Wye, on the England/Wales border, is one of
The River Wye is one of Britain's most scenic and unspoilt rivers.
www.all-about-olympic-games.com /canoeing_on_the_river_wye_c17.php   (285 words)

  
 River Wye   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Wye itself is a Site of Special Scientific Interest and one of the most important in Britain for nature conservation.
Walkers can enjoy the Wye Valley Walk which follows the route of the Wye from Hay-on-Wye to Chepstow along a of well maintained way-marked paths.
A viewpoint near The Biblins the Wye is known as 'Three counties as it is the meeting place of counties of Herefordshire Gloucestershire and Monmouthshire.
www.freeglossary.com /River_Wye   (265 words)

  
 Conwy Richards - Coracle Types - The River Usk Coracle and River Wye Coracle
The River Wye is surrounded by a more varied countryside than any other British river, starting in the Welsh Mountains and for the next 135 miles it flows through constantly changing scenery of woods and gorges till that gives way to rich farmland as it flows on its way to join the River Severn.
The River Wye is muddy, which is the reason why no Sea Trout venture into it unlike the large Salmon it attracts.
River Usk photograph showing a coracle fisherman taken in the 1920's looking towards Abergavenny, this bridge was opened in 1906 replacing an older Chain Bridge.
www.coracle-fishing.net /text-files/types-usk.htm   (816 words)

  
 A Walk along the River Wye in the Wye Valley   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Wye Walkers: Cees from Holland and Terence, Sam, Daryl and 2 dogs, Shadow and Jessie, a Doberman cross Collie and a Welsh Springer Spaniel, myself the delivery man. In the weeks running up to the expedition rainfall had been heavy and I was concerned the weather may deteriorate again.
From Builth to Erwood that Monday was not such a big distance, but it is very difficult to follow the river Wye, as a lot of people living there try to discourage the walkers by putting up signs saying that it is forbidden to walk through their property.
Through more woods we met the river Wye again and followed it leading us to the Hole-in-the-Wall, and then there was Ross at the end, in the light it looked like a white church and is wonderful mirroring itself in the River Wye.
www.wyevalley.uk.com /walk.php   (7675 words)

  
 Flooded River Wye at Ross, 6 February 2004 - Wyenot.com
The River Wye flooding is a fairly regular occurrance and happens on average at least once per year.
A view of the flooded River Wye from Bridstow Bridge, Ross-on-Wye, Herefordshire on 6th February 2004.
A view of the flooded River Wye from Wye Street, Ross-on-Wye, Herefordshire on 6th February 2004.
www.wyenot.com /floodfeb04.htm   (240 words)

  
 Fishing in Kite Country - Fishing - River Wye
On the River Wye the salmon fishing season extends from the 3rd March to the 17th October, with some minor variations.
The town of Hay on Wye is world famous on account of its numerous second-hand bookshops, where you could spend hours searching for almost any kind of book you could imagine.
Wye Valley Canoes at Glasbury will let you have a variety of canoes for anything from several hours to several days and will even pick you up if you decide to head off for a long-distance paddle.
www.fishing-in-kite-country.co.uk /fishing/rwye.html   (1836 words)

  
 River | Wye Valley Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB)
The River Wye is one of the finest rivers in Britain, and so it has been awarded status nationally as a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and internationally as a Special Area of Conservation (SAC) under the European Habitats and Species Directive.
Some are characteristic of the river and others are migratory species such as the allis and twaite shad, sea and river lampreys, and the Atlantic salmon.
Populations in the area of the Wye are recovering, but most otters are now on the tributary streams rather than the lower reaches of the main river.
www.wyevalleyaonb.org.uk /pages/wye_so_special/river.asp   (363 words)

  
 Hands on Nature - River Wye
The River Wye is renowned for its stunning scenery and wildlife.
The river and its valley are home to a wealth of wildlife including some of the most rare and endangered species of fish.
The River Wye is the fifth longest in Britain, rising in Wales and eventually forming part of the border between England and Wales.
www.bbc.co.uk /handsonnature/waterways/river_wye.shtml   (459 words)

  
 Canoe Hire on the River Wye with Black Mountain Activities   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Your journey continues after Hay with another 5 miles of meandering scenic river, Your destination is either the old wooden toll bridge at Whitney on Wye, or the Boat Inn (which is a further 10 minutes paddling).
Preston on Wye to Hereford ten miles traveling time Five to Six hours, there is no places for to stop for lunch apart for stopping on the side of the river bank for a picnic.
The campsite is located on the river left after Home Lacy Bridge which is a modern bridge at the junction of the B4399 add B4224.
www.blackmountain.co.uk /water/hire.htm   (878 words)

  
 THE WEIR GARDENS   (Site not responding. Last check: )
A visit was arranged in late March 2002 by Peter Williams of the Association of Roman Archaeology, with a view to observing the effects and extent of recent high water levels of the River Wye on the Roman remains.
The bed of the River Wye is here strewn with many large, dressed stones measuring around three or four feet on a side, each of which must weigh many tons.
Upon descending to the level of the river in order to more closely observe the effects of erosion on the Roman structures, Peter and myself observed what at first appeared to be a ceramic box-flue of the type used in Roman bath-houses.
www.roman-britain.org /places/weir_gardens.htm   (1216 words)

  
 Environment Agency - River Wye and its tributaries from Wycombe Marsh to Bourne E...
Environment Agency - River Wye and its tributaries from Wycombe Marsh to Bourne E...
You are in: Subjects > Flood > Current Flood Warnings in Force > River Wye and its tributaries from Wycombe Marsh to Bourne E...
River Wye and its tributaries from Wycombe Marsh to Bourne End
www.environment-agency.gov.uk /subjects/flood/floodwarning/25_1?time=1006790100   (150 words)

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