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Topic: Robert Curthose


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  Robert Curthose - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Robert fled to his uncle's court in Flanders before plundering the county of the Vexin and causing such mayhem that his father King William allied himself with King Philip I of France to stop his rebellious son.
Robert was forced by diplomacy to renounce his claim to the English throne in the Treaty of Alton.
Robert Curthose, sometime Duke of Normandy, eldest son of the Conqueror, was buried in the abbey church of St.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Robert_Curthose   (1464 words)

  
 Robert Curthose
Of the two sons, Robert was considered to be much the weaker and was generally preferred by the nobles who held lands on both sides of the English Channel, since they could more easily circumvent his authority.
Robert married Sybil, daughter of Geoffrey of Brindisi, Count of Conversano (and a grandniece of Robert Guiscard) and had one son, William Clito, heir to the Duchy of Normandy.
In 1106, Henry defeated Robert's army decisively at the Battle of Tinchebray and claimed Normandy as a possession of the English crown, a situation that endured for over a century.
www.guajara.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/r/ro/robert_curthose.html   (571 words)

  
 Robert Curthose   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Robert married Sybil, daughter of Geoffrey of Brindisi, Count of Conversano (Conversano: conversano is an ancient town and comune of bari province in the italyitalian region...
In 1096, Robert left for the Holy Land (Holy Land: An ancient country is southwestern Asia on the east coast of the Mediterranean; a place of pilgrimage for Christianity and Islam and Judaism) on the First Crusade (First Crusade: A Crusade from 1096 to 1099; captured Jerusalem and created a theocracy there).
Robert was forced by diplomacy to renounce his claim to the English throne in the Treaty of Alton (Treaty of Alton: more facts about this subject).
www.absoluteastronomy.com /reference/robert_curthose   (1061 words)

  
 The revolts of Robert Curthose   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Robert was born in 1052 and received as a child the title of Count of Maine.
Robert's attitude was that of the companions with whom he surrounded himself, bearing witness to the changes brought by the conquest.
Robert Curthose sought to obtain from his father the means of showing his rank, and in the face of the reluctance of the Duke-King to share his power, Robert rebelled (1077).
www.mondes-normands.caen.fr /angleterre/histoires/5/histoireNorm5_6.htm   (289 words)

  
 Robert Curthose
Robert finally arrived in England the following year, landing at Portsmouth with his invading army and then marching purposefully inland to meet Henry and his defending army at Alton in Hampshire.
Robert, who might easily have been King Robert I of England if only Henry had not been so ruthless and determined, was captured at the Battle ofTinchebray in 1106.
Robert survived the Battle of Tinchebray by almost twenty-eight years and died in 1134, aged eighty, only a few months before Henry himself.
www.royalty.info /british/Henry_I/robert_curthose.shtml   (598 words)

  
 Robert (II) Curthose (Duke of Normandy)
When the English throne passed to his younger brother William II in 1087, Robert was unable to recover it by war.
In 1106 Robert again attempted to recover England from Henry I, but was defeated at Tinchebrai and imprisoned until his death.
Robert won undying fame for his role on the First Crusade, especially for his charge at Ascalon in 1099 when he captured the Egyptian banner.
www.tiscali.co.uk /reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0020275.html   (158 words)

  
 Robert Curthose
Robert Curthose, the eldest son of William the Conqueror and Matilda of Flanders, was born in about 1053.
In 1061 it was arranged for Robert to Margaret, the sister and heiress of Count Herbert II of Maine.
Robert suggested in 1077 to his father that he should become the ruler of Normandy and Maine.
www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk /NORcurthose.htm   (324 words)

  
 Timelines - Henry I
Robert Curthose landed at Portsmouth to lay claim to the English throne.
Robert de Belleme, Earl of Shrewsbury, whose chief strongholds were in the Welsh Marches, was an exceptionally sadistic man and not popular with the English people.
A son, William Clito, was born to Robert Curthose.
www.historyonthenet.com /Chronology/timelinehenryi.htm   (1392 words)

  
 Robert II on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
ROBERT II [Robert II] (Robert Curthose), c.1054-1134, duke of Normandy (1087-1106); eldest son of King William I of England.
Robert Cahow is shown in a family photo before he was sent to Germany in World War II.
Robert Cahow is shown in a family photo with his fiancee Arlene Larson before he was sent to Germany in World War II.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/R/Rbrt2-N1orm.asp   (1194 words)

  
 Ancestors and Family of Robert II Curthose of Normandy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Robert was the eldest son of King William I of England.
England fell to his younger brother William II, with whom Robert was intermittently at war (1090-96) until Robert, in 1096, pawned Normandy to William so he could join the crusades of Pope Urban II.
Robert married Sibylla of Conversano, daughter of Geoffrey of Conversano and Unknown, in 1100 in Apulia, Sicily, Italy.
nygaard.howards.net /files/35.htm   (193 words)

  
 Robert Curthose - InfoSearchPoint.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
After William's death in 1087, Robert succeeded him as Duke of Normandy, but his younger brother, William Rufus took possession of the English throne.
Robert avoided confrontation by participating in the First Crusade.
However, on his return in 1101 he found that the English throne had passed to a still younger brother, Henry I, and he was not disposed to overlook this affront.
www.infosearchpoint.com /display/Robert_Curthose   (205 words)

  
 Ancestors of Eugene Ashton ANDREW & Anna Louise HANISH Duke Robert England NORMANDY, II ANDREW ANGERMUELLER HANISH ...
Robert was not able to excite any real insurrection in Normandy, but with the aid ofhis friends and of the French king he maintained a border war for some time, and defended castles with success against the king.
Against the demand of Henry he set the claim of Robert, the better claim according even to the law of that day, though the law which he urged was less that which would protect the right of the eldest born than the feudal law regarding homage done and fealty sworn.
Robert wounded his father in the hand and unhorsed him, and wouldindeed have killed him but for a timely rescue by an Englishman, one Tokig of Wallingford, who remounted the overthrown conqueror.
www.geneal.net /1311.htm   (2267 words)

  
 ROBERT CURTHOSE FACTS AND INFORMATION   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
As a child he was betrothed to the heiress of Maine, but she died before they could be wed, and Robert didn't marry until his late forties.
He visited Italy seeking the hand of Matilda of Tuscany, but was unsuccessful.
Robert married Sybilla, daughter of Geoffrey of Brindisi, Count of Conversano (and a grandniece of Robert Guiscard).
www.fandcproperties.com /Robert_Curthose   (1145 words)

  
 Timelines - William II
Robert Curthose did not join the rebellion, choosing to stay in Normandy.
Following a ruling by the Pope that all churchmen must firsly be loyal to their Pope and put their King second, William called this council to deal with the ever increasing gap between himself and his Archbishop of Canterbury, Anselem of Bec.
Robert Curthose decided that he would like to join the Pope's crusade to recover Jerusalem from the Muslims.
www.historyonthenet.com /Chronology/timelinewilliamrufus.htm   (849 words)

  
 World History Database of events in year 1105   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Keeps Rober Curthose arrested for the remaining 28 yrs of his life in Cardiff Castle
Captures Robert Curthose at the battle of Tinchebrai
Robert is taken prisoner by Henry I who rules over Normandy until the end of his reign
badley.info /history/1105.year.html   (163 words)

  
 Robert II, duke of Normandy
Robert II Robert II (Robert Curthose), c.1054–1134, duke of Normandy (1087–1106); eldest son of King
England fell to his younger brother William II, with whom Robert was intermittently at war (1090–96) until Robert went (1096–1100) on the First Crusade.
In Normandy, Robert's misgovernment prompted an invasion by Henry (1105), who defeated (1106) Robert at Tinchebrai, seized Normandy, and kept Robert a prisoner.
www.infoplease.com /ce6/people/A0842064.html   (265 words)

  
 William II
Robert was forced to flee and established himself at Gerberoi.
Robert was besieged at Gerberoi and during the fighting Rufus was wounded.
In 1095 William Rufus decided to bring Robert of Mowbray, the Earl of Northumberland, to justice.
www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk /MEDwilliamII.htm   (1100 words)

  
 LMB Robert Curthose   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
LMB Send private responses to: "Anne Gilbert" > Robert Curthose was the one who built the castle up at Newcastle upon Tyne > but I have actually never really delved much into his story.
Robert "Curthose" or Shortlegs in English, was William "Rufus" older brother.
And he was also Duke of Normandy, but didn't do too well at that job.
medievalbritain.cis.to /pipermail/lmb/2001-May/013871.html   (113 words)

  
 LMB Robert Curthose   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Robert doesn't seem to have possesed the > character to do so.
Wendy: I think that was the trouble with Robert.
He was kind a WYSIWYG kind of guy(What You See Is What You GEt).
medievalbritain.cis.to /pipermail/lmb/2000-March/039869.html   (95 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: St. Vitalis of Savigny
Vitalis gained the respect and confidence of Robert, who bestowed upon him a canonry in the Church of Saint Evroult at Mortain, which he had founded in 1082.
At the same time he concerned himself, like Robert of Arbrissel, with the salvation of the surrounding population, giving practical help to the outcasts who gathered round him.
He was a great preacher, remarkable for zeal, insensible to fatigue, and fearlessly outspoken; he is said to have attempted to reconcile Henry I of England with his brother, Robert Curthose.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/15486c.htm   (268 words)

  
 William Clito --¬† Encyclop√¶dia Britannica
French Guillaume Cliton count of Flanders and titular duke of Normandy (as William IV, or as William III if England's William Rufus' earlier claim to the duchy is not acknowledged).
Son of Duke Robert II Curthose (and grandson of William the Conqueror and Matilda of Flanders), William Clito was supported by Louis VI of France in claiming the duchy when his father…
Duke Robert Curthose, the eldest of the three brothers, who by feudal custom had succeeded to his father's inheritance, Normandy, was returning from the First Crusade and could not assert his own claim...
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9077048   (734 words)

  
 The world's top robert curthose websites
Charles W. David, Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy, Cambridge 1920
Judith Green, "Robert Curthose Reassessed", ''Anglo-Norman Studies vol.
Stephanie Mooers, "'Backers and Stabbers' : Problems of Loyalty in Robert Curthose's Entourage", Journal of British Studies, 21 (1981) 1-17
dirs.org /wiki-article-tab.cfm/robert_curthose   (663 words)

  
 Sons of the conquerer, Robert Curthose, William Rufus, Henry Beauclerc and the grandson Stephen - SLOCOMBE GEORGE   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Sons of the conquerer, Robert Curthose, William Rufus, Henry Beauclerc and the grandson Stephen - SLOCOMBE GEORGE
SLOCOMBE GEORGE Sons of the conquerer, Robert Curthose, William Rufus, Henry Beauclerc and the grandson Stephen
They offer full satisfaction and normal prices - no markups, no hidden costs, no overcharged shipping costs.
www.antiqbook.nl /boox/brb/19503.shtml   (81 words)

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