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Topic: Robert Peel


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In the News (Sun 16 Dec 18)

  
  Sir Robert Peel (1788-1850)
Robert Peel twice served as Prime Minister: from 10 December 1834 to 8 April 1835 and from 30 August 1841 to 29 June 1846.
Peel, the the eldest son and third of eleven children of Robert Peel (the first Baronet) and Ellen Yates, was born on 5 February 1788 at Chamber Hall near Bury in Lancashire.
Peel made his forty-minute long maiden speech on 23 January 1810 in which he seconded the reply to the King's speech at the opening of parliament; for his efforts, he was applauded by those who heard him speak.
www.victorianweb.org /history/pms/peel/peel10.html   (2101 words)

  
  Sir Robert Peel
During the depression of 1826, it was Peel who organised the response to the widespread unrest that was gripping Lancashire's textile regions and, three years later, after a brief spell out of office, he introduced his Metropolitan Police Act.
Peel expanded on the idea, and his system was quickly copied by other cities and towns before spreading across the world.
Peel was elected to his late father's Tamworth seat in 1830 and in 1834 became Prime Minister in a minority Conservative government, issuing his Tamworth Manifesto promising Tory support for modest electoral reform.
www.cottontimes.co.uk /peeljnr.htm   (418 words)

  
  Robert Peel
Peel felt compelled to resign his seat at Oxford, as what had made him attractive to that constituency in the first place was his opposition to it (in 1815 he had, in fact, challenged to a duel the man most associated with emancipation, Daniel O'Connell).
Peel therefore asked that some of this coterie be dismissed and replaced with their Conservative counterparts, provoking the so-called Bedchamber Crisis[?].
Peel was thrown from his horse while riding up Constitution Hill[?] in London on June 29, 1850, and died three days later at the age of 62.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ro/Robert_Peel.html   (1625 words)

  
  Robert Peel
Sir Robert Peel, 2nd Baronet (February 5, 1788–July 2, 1850) was British Prime Minister from December 1834 to April 1835, and again from June 1841 to June 29, 1846.
Peel felt compelled to resign his seat at Oxford, as what had made him attractive to that constituency in the first place was his opposition to it (in 1815 he had, in fact, challenged to a duel the man most associated with emancipation, Daniel O'Connell).
Peel was thrown from his horse while riding up Constitution Hill in London on June 29, 1850, and died three days later at the age of 62.
encyclopedia.codeboy.net /wikipedia/r/ro/robert_peel.html   (1591 words)

  
 Robert Peel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Peel was selected as Prime Minister, though he was in Italy at the time, so Wellington acted as a caretaker for the three weeks in November and December it took Peel to return.
Peel therefore asked that some of this coterie be dismissed and replaced with their Conservative counterparts, provoking the so-called Bedchamber Crisis.
Peel was thrown from his horse while riding up Constitution Hill in London on 29 June 1850, and died three days later at the age of 62.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Robert_Peel   (1808 words)

  
 SIR ROBERT PEEL - LoveToKnow Article on SIR ROBERT PEEL   (Site not responding. Last check: )
From his classical studies Robert Peel derived not only the classical, though somewhat pompous, character of his speeches and the Latin quotations with which they were often happily interspcrsed but something of his lofty ideal of political ambition.
Peel was converted to the currency doctrines of the economists, and proclaimed his conversion in a great speech on the 24th of May 1819, in which he moved and carried four resolutions embodying the recommendations of the bullion committee in favor of a return to cash payments.
WILLIAM YATES PEEL (1789-1858), educated at Harrow and at St John's College, Cambridge, was a member of parliament from 1817 to 1837, and again from 1847 to 1852; he was undersecretary for home affairs in 1828, and was a lord of the treasury in 1830 and again in 1834-1835.
97.1911encyclopedia.org /P/PE/PEEL_SIR_ROBERT.htm   (5920 words)

  
 Sir Robert Peel
Peel Tower, another monument erected to mark the life of Sir Robert Peel, was built by public subscription at a cost of £1000 and dedicated, the day after the of, the statue of Sir Robert, by Joshua Knowles of Stormer Hill.
Robert Peel was born on 5 th February 1788 the third child of Robert Senior and Ellen Peel who lived at Chamber Hall near Bury Ground.
Peel returned to the Commons as the MP for the family seat of Tamworth and for the first time he was now a member of the opposition party.
www.mbbcanal.demon.co.uk /trail/bury/Robertpeel/robertpeel.html   (1197 words)

  
 Sir Robert Peel (1788-1850)
Robert Peel was born on 5 February 1788 at Chamber Hall near Bury in Lancashire.
Peel made his forty-minute long maiden speech on 23 January 1810 in which he seconded the reply to the King's speech at the opening of parliament; for his efforts, he was applauded by those who heard him speak.
Peel was on holiday in Italy but eventually was tracked down on 25 November; he returned and took up the post of both PM and Chancellor of the Exchequer on 9 December 1834.
www.dialspace.dial.pipex.com /town/terrace/adw03/pms/peelbio.htm   (2268 words)

  
 Robert Peel - Textop Wiki
Sir Robert Peel, 2nd Baronet (5 February 1788 – 2 July 1850) was a Conservative Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from December 10, 1834 to April 8, 1835, and again from August 30, 1841 to June 29, 1846.
Peel was born in the Lancashire town of Bury to the industrialist and Member of Parliament Sir Robert Peel.
Peel felt compelled to resign his seat at Oxford, as he had stood on a platform of opposition to Catholic Emancipation (in 1815 he had, in fact, challenged to a duel the man most associated with emancipation, Daniel O'Connell).
www.textop.org /wiki/index.php?title=Robert_Peel   (2359 words)

  
 The Peel Society. The home of the Peel Society on the web.
The Peel Society was founded in 1979 to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the establishment of the Metropolitan Police Force.
Sir Robert Peel, is remembered for many notable Acts of Parliament and policies, such as the founding of the Metropolitan Police in 1829 and in the same year, Catholic Emancipation.
The Peel Society is seeking to establish in Tamworth a national Memorial to Sir Robert Peel, Second Baronet which celebrates the life and work of Sir Robert Peel and the period in which he lived.
www.thepeelsociety.org.uk   (445 words)

  
 Sir Robert Peel
Robert Peel's period in government - as prime minister and in other offices - was a milestone for social reform.
Robert Peel was the son of a wealthy Lancashire cotton mill owner who was also Member of Parliament for Tamworth.
Lady Peel was distraught at her husband's death and lived a quiet life until her own death in 1859.
www.number-10.gov.uk /output/Page151.asp   (877 words)

  
 Sir Robert Peel
Peel, however, was himself the controlling intellect of the government of which he was the head, and was doubtless superior in attainments and political genius to Wellington, to Earl Grey, and Lord John Russell,--premiers like him, and prominent as statesmen.
Peel, although only home secretary under Wellington, was the prominent member of the administration, and was practically the leader of the House of Commons, in which character he himself introduced the bill for Catholic relief.
Sir Robert Peel's mission was that of a financier and political economist, which, next to that of warrior, brings the greatest influence and fame in a commercial and manufacturing country like England.
www.aardbargain.com /peel-robert.html   (5766 words)

  
 Robert Peel, Sir Biography | Encyclopedia of World Biography
Robert Peel was born on Feb. 5, 1788, at Chamber Hall, Bury, Lancashire, close to the cotton mills that had made his father's immense fortune.
In 1819 Peel chaired the committee of the House of Commons that made the crucial recommendation that Britain return to the gold standard, and the statute that accomplished this was commonly known as "Peel's Act." It was also during this period that Peel made a singularly happy marriage with society belle Julia Floyd.
Peel's first government is notable mainly in that it allowed him to redefine Tory goals, particularly in the Tamworth Manifesto, which he issued to his constituents on the eve of the general election.
www.bookrags.com /biography/robert-peel-sir   (1699 words)

  
 Britannia Government: Prime Ministers
Peel entered Parliament as a Tory, in 1809, a party which he sought to reform under the name of the Conservative Party, following the passage of the reform Bill of 1832 which he opposed.
Peel was prime minister twice, falling from favour due to the repeal of the Corn Laws.
Peel died 2 July 1850 from injuries sustained on 29 June when he was thrown from a horse.
www.britannia.com /gov/primes/prime28.html   (246 words)

  
 Robert Peel
Robert Peel was educated at Harrow School and Christ Church, Oxford, where he won a double first in classics and mathematics.
Robert Peel entered the House of Commons in April 1809, at the age of twenty-one.
However, Robert Peel was not successful in carrying out this policy and eventually he became seen as one of the leading opponents to Catholic Emancipation.
www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk /PRpeel.htm   (1747 words)

  
 Sir Robert Peel
Robert Peel was born on the 5th February 1788 at Chamber Hall, Bury, the first son and third child of Robert Peel Senior (a wealthy cotton spinner and print works owner) and Ellen Peel who lived at Chamber Hall, Bury.
Peel became a Cabinet minister in 1822 when he was 34 years old as Home Secretary for Lord Liverpool's Tory government, he reformed the gaols and reduced the amount of offences that carried the death penalty.
Peel was a shrewd businessman and, aware that his introduction of machinery was sure to cause problems among traditional Lancashire textile workers, he built a new factory in Tamworth and manned it partly with pauper children from London workhouses.
www.ourwardfamily.com /sir_robert_peel.htm   (1226 words)

  
 Timeline of Sir Robert Peel's Life
Peel became Under-Secretary for War and the Colonies in the Tory government of Spencer Perceval, at the age of 22.
Peel became the Chief Secretary for Ireland in the new government of Lord Liverpool.
Peel reformed the gaols and reduced the amount of offences that carried the death penalty.
www.thecore.nus.edu.sg /landow/victorian/history/peel.html   (850 words)

  
 Peel, Sir Robert. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
In opposing parliamentary reform he recovered some of the Tory support that he lost by this position, and after the Reform Bill of 1832 (see Reform Acts) had passed despite his opposition, he rallied the party and was prime minister for a brief term (1834–35).
Peel was asked to form a cabinet in 1839 but declined when the young Queen Victoria refused to make requested changes in her household.
Peel had formerly defended these laws, which protected Tory agricultural interests, but he was impressed by the arguments of Richard Cobden against them and convinced by the disastrous effect of the potato famine in Ireland.
www.bartleby.com /65/pe/Peel-Sir.html   (455 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Robert Peel   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Robert Peel (often known as Bobby Peel) was a Yorkshire and England cricket player: a left-arm spinner who ranks as one of the finest bowlers of the 1890s.
Born on February 12, 1857, Peel emerged in first-class cricket for Yorkshire in 1882 and quickly established himself as a skilful left-arm spin bowler with extraordinary accuracy of pitch and the ability to bowl a fast ball that obtained many wickets.
Peel equalled his 1888 haul of 171 wickets in 1890, and came close to a thousand runs in 1889 and 1891, scoring in the former year 158 against Middlesex.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Robert-Peel   (1177 words)

  
 Sir Robert Peel
Robert Peel was born at Peelfold, Lancashire on 25th April 1750.
At the age of twenty-three Robert Peel was made a partner and soon afterwards took charge of the company.
Peel was aware that some factory owner's treated their young workers very badly.
lancefuhrer.com /peel.htm   (306 words)

  
 Peel & Repeal - Irish Nationalism in Wake of Famine
Peel's first job when he came into office in 1841 was to balance the budget for the Whigs had mismanaged funds.
Peel further reiterated that the scarcity of the potato was mounting towards "appalling" levels for, because of the famine on the continent, it was going to be impossible to secure the amount of potatoes needed from any foreign source.
Robert Peel's actions were certainly Victorian; he understood the responsibilities of his position as Prime Minister and he did what he thought was right to preserve the union of Great Britian.
www.geocities.com /Athens/Aegean/7023/peel.html   (3744 words)

  
 Who is Sir Robert Peel?
Robert Peel was born into a noble family in the late 1780s, his father was a successful Lancashire businessman who had benefitted greAtly at the start of the industrial revolution.
Peel was an Ultra but as the head of the party it fell tto him to give in to Catholic Emancipation, which contrasted greatly with his 'orange peel' years, and led many Tories to view him as a traitor.
Peel's economic focus was maybe a logical extention of his background in industry, but it won him many enemies who saw it as an all consuming obsession.
sdsd.essortment.com /robertpeelsir_pao.htm   (714 words)

  
 Peel Web home page
Peel was responsible for the establishment of the Metropolitan Police Force in 1829 and was Prime Minister for a short time in 1834-5.
Peel has been seen as both the founder and betrayer of the Conservative Party and also as the real founder of the Liberal Party.
The Peel Web continues the story begun in another, related web, The Age of George III
www.historyhome.co.uk /peel/peelhome.htm   (554 words)

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