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Topic: Robert Simson


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In the News (Mon 22 Jul 19)

  
  Simson biography
Simson also set himself the task of preparing an edition of Euclid's Elements in as perfect a form as possible, and his edition of Euclid's books 1-6, 11 and 12 was for many years the standard text and formed the basis of textbooks on geometry written by other authors.
Robert Simson was the first person to be appointed to the office of Clerk (later known as Clerk of Senate), which he took up in 1728 and only demitted when he retired in 1761.
Robert Simson died in his eight-first year and was buried in the neighbouring Blackfriars burial ground, where a marble tombstone, bearing a long laudatory Latin inscription, was raised in his memory.
www-history.mcs.st-and.ac.uk /history/Biographies/Simson.html   (1822 words)

  
  ROBERT SIMSON - LoveToKnow Article on ROBERT SIMSON   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
(1687-1768), Scottish mathematician, the eldest so1~i of John Simson of Kirktonhill in Ayrshire, was born on the 14th of October 1687.
He was intended for the church, but the bent of his mind was towards mathematics, and, when a prospect opened of his succeeding to the mathematical chair at the university of Glasgow, he p ceeded to London for further study.
Simsons contributions to mathematical knowledge took the form of critical editions and commentaries on the works of the ancient ge~meters.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /S/SI/SIMSON_ROBERT.htm   (360 words)

  
 Robert Simson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Robert Simson (October 14, 1687 – October 1, 1768) was a mathematician and professor of mathematics.
The eldest son of John Simson of Kirktonhill in Ayrshire, he was intended for the church, but the bent of his mind was towards mathematics, and, when a prospect opened of his succeeding to the mathematical chair at the university of Glasgow, he proceeded to London for further study.
Simson's contributions to mathematical knowledge took the form of critical editions and commentaries on the works of the ancient geometers.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Robert_Simson   (402 words)

  
 math lessons - Robert Simson
Robert Simson (October 4, 1687 – October 1, 1768) was a mathematician and professor of mathematics.
The the eldest son of John Simson of Kirktonhill in Ayrshire, he was intended for the church, but the bent of his mind was towards mathematics, and, when a prospect opened of his succeeding to the mathematical chair at the university of Glasgow, he proceeded to London for further study.
Simson's contributions to mathematical knowledge took the form of critical editions and commentaries on the works of the ancient geometers.
www.mathdaily.com /lessons/Robert_Simson   (403 words)

  
 Robert Simson
SIMSON, (DR) ROBERT, a mathematician, was the eldest son of Mr John Simson of Kirton-hall, in Ayrshire, and was born on the 14th October, 1687.
The first occupation of Mr Simson, was to arrange a proper course of instruction for the students who attended his lectures, in two distinct classes; accordingly, he prepared elementary sketches of some branches, on which there were not suitable treatises in general use.
In 1758, Dr Simson having arrived at the advanced age of seventy-one years, found it expedient to employ an assistant in teaching; and in 1761, on his recommendation, the reverend Dr Williamson was made his assistant and successor.
www.electricscotland.com /History/other/simson_robert.htm   (1785 words)

  
 Simson
Some 850 volumes, mainly early mathematical and astronomical texts, comprising the library of Robert Simson (1687-1768), Professor of Mathematics at Glasgow University from 1712 to 1761.
Simson, influenced by Edmund Halley, concentrated his research on the early Greek mathematicians and he published important works on Euclid, Pappus of Alexandria and Apollonius of Perga.
Simson’s library, which reflects his special interest in the Greek mathematical writers, was bequeathed to the University in 1768.
special.lib.gla.ac.uk /collection/simson.html   (109 words)

  
 ROBERT SIMSON (1687-1768) - Online Information article about ROBERT SIMSON (1687-1768)
SIMSON (1687-1768), Scottish mathematician, the eldest son of See also:
CHURCH (according to most authorities derived from the Gr.
Simson is greatest as a landscapist; his " Solway See also:
encyclopedia.jrank.org /SHA_SIV/SIMSON_ROBERT_1687_1768_.html   (708 words)

  
 ROBERT SIMSON FACTS AND INFORMATION
Robert Simson (October_14, 1687 – October_1, 1768) was a mathematician and professor of mathematics.
The eldest son of John Simson of Kirktonhill in Ayrshire, he was intended for the church, but the bent of his mind was towards mathematics, and, when a prospect opened of his succeeding to the mathematical chair at the university_of_Glasgow, he proceeded to London for further study.
The pedal_line of a triangle is sometimes called the Simson Line after him.
www.bellabuds.com /Robert_Simson   (380 words)

  
 §6. Robert Sempill and "The Life and Death of Habbie Simson". XIV. Scottish Popular Poetry before Burns. Vol. 9. ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Robert Sempill and "The Life and Death of Habbie Simson".
Meanwhile, the old poetic methods of the “makaris” had been preserved or revived by Robert Sempill, of Beltrees, Renfrewshire, in his eulogy of the village piper of Kilbarchan, Habbie Simson.
If The Life and Death of Habbie Simson is but a moderately good achievement, it is hardly exaggeration to affirm that, but for it, the course of Scottish vernacular verse would, in certain almost cardinal respects, have been widely different from what it turned out to be.
www.bonus.com /contour/bartlettqu/http@@/www.bartleby.com/219/1406.html   (462 words)

  
 Robert Simson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Robert Simson (October 4, 1687 – October 1, 1768) was a mathematician and professor of mathematics.
Simson's line theorem (http://agutie.homestead.com/files/simsontheorem1.html) by Antonio Gutierrez from "Geometry Step by Step from the Land of the Incas"
Angle between two Simson's lines (http://agutie.homestead.com/files/simsonangletheorem1.html) by Antonio Gutierrez from "Geometry Step by Step from the Land of the Incas"
www.secaucus.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Robert_Simson   (445 words)

  
 Robert Simson -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Robert Simson (October 4, 1687 – October 1, 1768) was a mathematician and professor of (A science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement) mathematics.
Simson's contributions to mathematical knowledge took the form of critical editions and commentaries on the works of the ancient (A mathematician specializing in geometry) geometers.
The volume contains also dissertations on (The exponent required to produce a given number) Logarithms and on the Limits of Quantities and Ratios, and a few problems illustrative of the ancient geometrical analysis.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/r/ro/robert_simson.htm   (462 words)

  
 Simson line
This definition is somewhat strange, for nowhere in the works of Robert Simson (1687-1768) any reference was found to the line that bears his name.
For example, existence of Simson lines together with the Pivot theorem could be used to demonstrate the existence of Miquel's point for a 4-line.
As an example, consider the Simson line of a point P and the diametrically opposite to P point Q. The Simson lines of P and Q are orthogonal.
www.cut-the-knot.org /ctk/SimsonLine.shtml   (1129 words)

  
 Salisbury "Crossroad of Delmarva"
Simson previously requested to change the name of the purchaser to Dana Simson and John Orth instead of Dana Simson, t/a Chesapeake East Company.
AGREED TO: Paragraph to read: Simson will spend the sum of One Hundred Eighty Thousand Dollars ($180,000) on renovation of the building within the time period of spring of 1999 as set forth in the Proposal for the property, Exhibit B attached hereto and made a part hereof.
Simson advised Council of her landscaping and ornamental fence plans for the area.
www.ci.salisbury.md.us /CityClerk/98apr27.html   (3261 words)

  
 simson   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
The Simson lines for two points on the opposite ends of a diameter are perpendicular to each other, and meet on the Nine Point Circle.
At the suggestion of Edmond Halley, for whom the comet is named, Simson devoted himself to the restoration of the work of the early Greek geometers, such as Euclid and Apollonius of Perga.
Although Simson did make numerous discoveries in geometry and may have found a proof of this one, he certainly was not the first to do so.
www.pballew.net /simson.html   (262 words)

  
 Toms Family Tree - pafn12 - Generated by Personal Ancestral File
Robert Leete was born circa 1525 in England.
She married Robert Leete, son of John Leete and Ellen Burgoyne, on 6 April 1573 in Great Eversden, Cambridgeshire, England.
The time period when George and Susanna were married can be determined by John Simson's burial at Watertown on 10 June 1643 and by the sales of Simson's real estate.
www.showshown.com /pedigree/pafn12.htm   (1139 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Books: Database Nation (Hardback)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Simson Garfinkel couples this idea with concepts like "data shadow" and "datasphere" in Database Nation, offering a decidedly unappealing scenario of how we have overlooked privacy with the advent of advanced technology.
Simson Garfinkel's book is a work of great importance which should be read by anyone concerned about Freedom in the Internet Age.
Simson Garfinkel paints a chilling picture of the complete lack of privacy today because we have the technology to store and retrieve almost every transaction and occurrence that goes on in our lives.
www.amazon.com /exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1565926536?v=glance   (3269 words)

  
 Simson Coat of Arms
The name Simson is of Anglo-Saxon origin and came from the baptismal name Simon, which was originally derived from the Hebrew word Shimeon meaning obedience.
They named their children after saints in the hope that the child would be blessed or protected by the saint.
Some of the first settlers of this name or some of its variants were: Henry Simpson who settled in Maine in 1635; John and Joe Simpson settled in Boston in 1635; Robert Simpson settled in Maryland in 1633; another Robert Simpson settled in Salem in 1630.
www.houseofnames.com /xq/asp.c/qx/simson-coat-arms.htm   (1317 words)

  
 BSHM: Gazetteer -- G
Robert Simson (1687-1768) was the third Professor for 50 years from 1711 to 1761.
Simson's 1756 edition of Euclid was in use until the early 20C.
A Simson Chair was founded in 1955 and held by Ian Naismith Sneddon (1919-) in 1956-1985.
www.dcs.warwick.ac.uk /bshm/zingaz/G.html   (2093 words)

  
 ISTE | February (No. 5)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Simson’s Theorem, for example, is a simple historical construction that lends itself to using software to explore the theorem and variations of it.
Simson Line where P is a vertex of acute triangle.
The Simson exploration was unique for most students because many had not heard of the theorem before its presentation in class.
www.iste.org /inhouse/publications/ll/28/5/28e/index.cfm?Section=LL_28_5   (1609 words)

  
 Simson   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
The angle between the Simson lines SIM and S'I'M' of two points P and P' is half the angle of the arc PP'.Simson line Application.
Simson is the associate dean for academic affairs at Cornell University Law School in New York.
Gary J. Simson is a professor of law and Associate Dean of Academic Affairs at Cornell Law School.
supersearching.com /k/simson.html   (698 words)

  
 Worldroots.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Ephraim Turner, lieutenant of Captain Oliver's company, was the son of Robert Turner, who came to Boston, September 4, 1633, in the ship Griffin, with Rev. John Cotton.
Robert and his wife Penelope had their eldest son Ephraim who was born December 13, 1639.
His children, all born in Boston, were: Derlow born Dec. 3, 1663; Robert born June 17, 1665; Sarah born March 24, 1666-7; Abigail born June 8, 1669; Ephraim born Nov. 23, 1670; Elizabeth born August 19, 1672; Deliverance born August 1, 1673.
worldroots.com /brigitte/famous/a/appletonstory.htm   (3208 words)

  
 Xah: Special Plane Curves: Deltoid
An inversion of deltoid with respect to its center.(according to Robert C. Yates, this is Cote's spiral)
The line passing through them is called Simson line of the triangle with respect to P. Find Simson lines for other points P on the circle.
The pedal of deltoid with respect to a cusp, vertex, or center is a folium with one, two, or three loops respectively.
xahlee.org /SpecialPlaneCurves_dir/Deltoid_dir/deltoid.html   (545 words)

  
 Robert Burns - The Works of Robert Burns
The whole book is available for reading as 9.pdf files and our sincere thanks to the author George Scott Wilkie for allowing us to publish his book on the site.
At the inaugural "Robert Burns Memorial Lecture" in the UN Building Jan. 13th 2004.
This is a.pdf file about Robert Burns taken from the publication Scottish Men of Letters of the eighteenth century.
www.electricscotland.com /burns   (363 words)

  
 Forma estándar   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
In the english speaking literature the problem is associated with Robert Simson who tought at about 1750 at the University of Glasgow
In the case that there is an angle of 120° the Fermat point coincides with the vertex of an angle.
If there is an angles, which is larger than 120°, the intersection point of the Simson lines lies outside of the triangle and is not the point minimizing the sum of the distances.
www.mathematik.uni-kl.de /~mamaeusch/standort_e/kap7.html   (710 words)

  
 Robert Burns Country: The Burns Encyclopedia: Simson, Patrick (1765-1848)
Son of John Simson of Ochiltree, and brother of William.
Patrick was session clerk at Ochiltree, and did much to sort out the confused parish register.
He was responsible for correcting the proofs of the reprints issued by the Auchinleck Press, by permission of Sir Alexander Boswell.
www.robertburns.org /encyclopedia/SimsonPatrick1765-1848.790.shtml   (345 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Books: Houses that Change the World   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Simson writes with grace, clear exegesis of Scripture, and a heart to touch the nations with the gospel.
Wolfgang Simson gives readers a vision of how house churches can be planted, and how these home meetings are a good tool for evangelism.
I got the impression that Wolfgang Simson's view of church government was a bit more like a cell church system put into house church packaging.
www.amazon.com /exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/185078356X?v=glance   (1853 words)

  
 The Oakland Press: Local News: They're stuck on rare stamps
Robert Simson, owner of Mark-Lane Stamps of New York, had two of the rarest stamps in the room: Both are 1918 red and blue biplane stamps on which the plane appears to be upside down.
There are 81 left of the original 100 stamps that were sold on a single sheet for $24 in Washington, D.C., said Simson, who has "Not for Sale" clearly marked on the two he has owned and cared for for 20 years.
"A copy that is not as well centered as these sold for $110,000" at a recent show, said Simson, who started collecting about 50 years ago, when he was 9 and a poor kid in the Bronx.
www.theoaklandpress.com /stories/111504/loc_20041115025.shtml   (722 words)

  
 WILLIAM SIMSON - LoveToKnow Article on WILLIAM SIMSON   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
WILLIAM SIMSON - LoveToKnow Article on WILLIAM SIMSON
Simson is greatest as a landscapist; his Soiway MossSunset, exhibited in the Royal Scottish Academy of 1831 and now in the National Gallery, Edinburgh, ranks as one of the finest examples of the early Scottish school of landscape.
To properly cite this WILLIAM SIMSON article in your work, copy the complete reference below:
www.1911encyclopedia.org /S/SI/SIMSON_WILLIAM.htm   (152 words)

  
 The Halcyon: The Newsletter of the Friends of the Thomas Fisher Library Issue #26, November 2000
In medicine, a succession of Scottish physicians from Archibald Pitcairne through to Robert Whytt, John Gregory, and William Cullen established themselves as theorists of the first rank in Europe, while the Edinburgh medical school founded in the 1720s gradually displaced Leyden as the centre of medical education in the Atlantic world.
In the physical sciences, Scottish professors were among the first to introduce Newtonian science into their teaching, and Sir Isaac Newton counted amongst his earliest disciples a number of Scots, including Pitcairne, and David Gregory, who left Edinburgh to become the Savillian Professor of Astronomy at Oxford in 1691.
With the assistance of the typefounder Alexander Wilson, Robert and Andrew Foulis became famous primarily for their editions of the classics, which were renowned for both their physical beauty and their scholarly excellence.
www.library.utoronto.ca /development/news/halcyon/nov2000/article6.htm   (1478 words)

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