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Topic: Robert of Normandy


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In the News (Tue 18 Jun 19)

  
  Robert Curthose - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Robert fled to his uncle's court in Flanders before plundering the county of the Vexin and causing such mayhem that his father King William allied himself with King Philip I of France to stop his rebellious son.
Robert married Sybilla, daughter of Geoffrey of Brindisi, Count of Conversano (and a grandniece of Robert Guiscard).
Robert was forced by diplomacy to renounce his claim to the English throne in the Treaty of Alton.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Robert_Curthose   (1158 words)

  
 Normandy
Normandy is a historic and cultural region encompassing the northern French départements of Manche, Calvados, Orne, Eure, and Seine-Maritime and coextensive with the former province of Normandy.
The Normandy coast was repeatedly devastated by raids of the Vikings, or Northmen (see Normans), from the 8th century on, and as its Carolingian rulers became weaker, the Vikings penetrated farther inland in the course of their depredations.
Normandy is a region of flat grasslands and farmlands interrupted by gentle hills and the hedges that commonly serve to demarcate fields.
www.orbilat.com /Encyclopaedia/N/Normandy.html   (917 words)

  
 Wikipedia: Robert Curthose
In 1100, during Robert's absence, William Rufus died, allowing their younger brother Henry to seize the crown of England with popular support.
In 1101, Robert landed at Portsmouth with his army, but his lack of popular support among the English allowed Henry resist the invasion.
In 1106, Henry defeated Robert's army decisively at the Battle of Tinchebray and claimed Normandy as a possession of the English crown, a situation that endured for over a century.
www.factbook.org /wikipedia/en/r/ro/robert_curthose.html   (560 words)

  
 The Age of Chivalry - Robert II Curthose, Duke of Normandy 1087-1106   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Normandy was the family inheritance and as a result went to the eldest son, which was the usual custom, whereas England was a province gained by conquest and could be given to whomever William wished.
Robert, though something of a lousy governor, found a niche in crusading and was present in many of the prominent battles: the Battle of Dorylaeum (1st July 1097), the Siege of Antioch (October 1097 – June 1098), and the Siege of Jerusalem.
Robert de Bellême was a ruthless baron and although he lost his lands in England and Wales to the King he still owned many castles in Normandy (where Bellême itself was located) and went on the rampage; anyone not submitting themselves to him, be they knight or lady, were mutilated or put to death.
www.taoc.co.uk /content/view/30/43   (861 words)

  
 Normandy. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Normandy is a region of flat farmland, forests, and gentle hills.
With the exception of the larger Channel Islands, Normandy was permanently restored to France in 1450, and in 1499, Louis XII established a provincial parlement for Normandy at Rouen.
The revocation of the Edict of Nantes (1685) led to a mass migration of Huguenots from Normandy and a grave economic setback for the region.
www.bartleby.com /65/no/Normndy.html   (525 words)

  
 Robert, Count of Mortain -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
During the next decade Robert was a close counselor of his half-brother, appearing frequently at his court, including the councils at which the (Click link for more info and facts about invasion of England) invasion of England was planned.
Robert seems to have been uninterested in English politics -- some say he lacked the cleverness for it -- and he spent most of the remainder of the Conqueror's reign in Normandy.
Odo seems to have pushed him into action, for Robert took part in the (Click link for more info and facts about Rebellion of 1088) Rebellion of 1088 which attempted to replace William Rufus with (Click link for more info and facts about Robert Curthose) Robert Curthose.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/r/ro/robert,_count_of_mortain.htm   (367 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Normandy
Thus Normandy for nearly a century and a half was at once a sort of promontory of the Christian world in face of Scandinavia and at the same time a coign of Scandinavia thrust into the Christian world.
His rule in Normandy was at first disturbed by the partisans of Guillaume Cliton, son of Robert Courte-Heuse, and later by the plot concocted against him by his own daughter Matilda, widow of Emperor Henry V, who had taken as her second husband Geoffrey Plantagenet, Count of Anjou.
During the French Revolution Normandy was one of the centres of the federalist movement known as the Girondin.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/11104a.htm   (3689 words)

  
 Ancestors and Family of Robert II Curthose of Normandy
Robert was the eldest son of King William I of England.
In Normandy, Robert's misgovernment prompted an invasion by Henry (1105), who defeated (1106) Robert at Tinchebrai, seized Normandy, and kept Robert a prisoner until he died.
Robert married Sibylla of Conversano, daughter of Geoffrey of Conversano and Unknown, in 1100 in Apulia, Sicily, Italy.
nygaard.howards.net /files/35.htm   (193 words)

  
 Ancestors of Eugene Ashton ANDREW & Anna Louise HANISH Duke Robert NORMANDY, I ANDREW ANGERMUELLER HANISH STRUDELL ...
Here Robert of Normandy had brought the tanner's daughter and here the healthy child had been born to her who became William the Conqueror.
The New Columbia Encyclopedia, 1975, p2333, Robert I the Magnificent: Died Abt 1035, Duke of Normandy 1027-1035; father of William the Conqueror.
Had Robert not died on his way back from a pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 1035, it is highly probable that he would have staged an invasion of England on these young men's behalf.
www.geneal.net /1345.htm   (1133 words)

  
 normandy
William married in 1053 at the Cathedral of Notre Dame d'Eu, Normandy to Matilda of Flanders.
Robert was the eldest of a vast number of natural (illegitimate) children of King Henry I. Click on The Children of King Henry for details.
Robert de Caen, called "the Consul", married to Mabel (Maud) Fitz Hamon, daughter and heiress of Robert Fitz Hamon, Lord of Glamorgan and his wife Sibyl who was a daughter of Roger de Montgomery, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury.
www3.sympatico.ca /robert.sewell/normandy.html   (2938 words)

  
 Normandy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Its inhabitants were Christianized in the 3rd and 4th centuries AD and passed under Merovingian Frankish rule in the late 5th century, becoming part of the Frankish kingdom of Neustria.
The Normandy coast was repeatedly devastated by raids of the Vikings, or Northmen, from the 8th century on, and as its Carolingian rulers became weaker, the Vikings penetrated farther inland in the course of their depredations.
William, duke of Normandy and a distant successor to Rollo, mounted an invasion of England in 1066, becoming William I of England (William the Conqueror) and thus uniting the rule of England and Normandy in himself.
www.hfac.uh.edu /gbrown/philosophers/leibniz/BritannicaPages/Normandy/Normandy.html   (904 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Robert II, duke of Normandy (French History, Biography) - Encyclopedia
Robert II (Robert Curthose), c.1054–1134, duke of Normandy (1087–1106); eldest son of King William I of England.
England fell to his younger brother William II, with whom Robert was intermittently at war (1090–96) until Robert went (1096–1100) on the First Crusade.
In Normandy, Robert's misgovernment prompted an invasion by Henry (1105), who defeated (1106) Robert at Tinchebrai, seized Normandy, and kept Robert a prisoner.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/R/Rbrt2-Norm.html   (243 words)

  
 History of England, Medieval Britain
Despite the faults of William ll, England was governed well compared to Normandy, where a constant state of anarchy prevailed and where Duke Robert was unable to control his barons who waged private wars, built castles without license and acted as petty, independent sovereigns.
Robert was held captive in Cardiff Castle in Wales to spend the remainder of his life a closely-guarded prisoner.
His one great mistake was to entrust the infant son of Robert, William the Clito, to the charge of one who would later raise a rebellion against him, and for twenty years, the policies of Henry and his Norman possessions was determined by those who continued to plot against him.
www.britannia.com /history/narmedhist2.html   (2955 words)

  
 Robert Knight v Normandy Mining Limited (2000) NTMC 2Workers compensation -- work health - partial incapacity -- ...
On one argument, because of the worker's natural susceptibility to underground conditions, he was never suited to working underground, and the question thus arises whether or not, as a result of his condition preventing him from returning underground, he has been incapacitated for work in any way as a result of his employment at Woodcutters.
Whatever the basis of suspension, it was imposed on the worker and the worker, at least for the purposes of these proceedings, appears to have accepted the period of suspension.
On the evidence the drug and alcohol policies of Brambles and Normandy which were in draft form at the relevant time appear to have as their intent to provide for temporary suspension on the first occasion that an employee was in breach of the guidelines.
www.nt.gov.au /ntsc/doc/sentencing_remarks/0/2000/0/NS000090.htm   (5733 words)

  
 Ancestors of Eugene Ashton ANDREW & Anna Louise HANISH Duchess Sibyl De Conversana NORMANDY ANDREW ANGERMUELLER HANISH ...
The ground of Robert's rebellion was the common one of dissatisfaction with his position and his father's refusal to part with any of his power in his favour.
Robert was not able to exciteany real insurrection in Normandy, but with the aid of his friends and of the French king he maintained a border war for some time, and defended castles with success against the king.
Against the demand of Henry he set the claim of Robert, the better claim according even to the law of that day, though the law which he urged was less that which would protect the right of the eldest born than the feudal law regarding homage done and fealty sworn.
www.geneal.net /1321.htm   (2347 words)

  
 DUKE ROBERT OF NORMANDY
1054-1134), Duke of Normandy, was the eldest son of King William I of England.
After William's death in 1087, Robert succeeded him as Duke of Normandy, but his younger brother, William Rufus took possession of the English throne.
However, on his return in 1101 he found that the English throne had passed to a still younger brother, Henry I, and he was not disposed to overlook this affront.
www.websters-online-dictionary.org /definition/DUKE+ROBERT+OF+NORMANDY   (191 words)

  
 September 27th
ROBERT, DUKE OF By the battle of Tinchebrai, fought this day in 1106, was decided the destiny of the dukedom of Normandy, and of its unfortunate ruler Robert, the eldest son of William the Conqueror.
Leaving to his brother William the care of his Norman subjects, he yielded to the religious and chivalric spirit of the times, and with the choicest of the nobility set out to show his valour on the plains of Syria, where he was one of the chiefs of the first Crusade.
We can only praise the courage and military exploits of Duke Robert in the east; they were so extraordinary as to obtain him the offer of the crown of Jerusalem, which, on his refusal, was given to Godfrey of Bouillon.
www.thebookofdays.com /months/sept/27.htm   (880 words)

  
 CNN.com - AngloGold lifts bid for Normandy by 16% - November 29, 2001
Normandy said later its board would meet as soon as possible to consider its position.
Normandy, based in Adelaide, is Australia's biggest gold miner, producing more than 2 million ounces a year.
Normandy executive chairman Robert Champion de Crespigny told shareholders on November 15 that he and the other board members intended to accept the Newmont offer.
archives.cnn.com /2001/BUSINESS/asia/11/28/aust.anglogold.biz   (631 words)

  
 Normandy
William II of Normandy, King of England, Duke of Normandy, "the Conqueror", b 14 Oct 1028, Falaise, Normandy, d 10 Sep 1087, Hermenbraville, Rouen, Normandy.
She md Geoffrey V of Anjou, "Le Bon", Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, 22 May 1127, Sarthe, France, son of Fulk V of Anjou, Count of Anjou, and Erembourg of Maine.
She md Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulan, 1165, son of Sir Waleran de Beaumont, Earl of Worcester, Count of Meulan, and Agnes/Elizabeth de Montfort.
www.geneajourney.com /nrmndy.html   (2966 words)

  
 Welcome to WWW.BeMentFamily.Com
Oplaendinge, Jarl of the Uplands of Norway) was born 1052 in Normandy, France, and died 10 Feb 1133/34 in Cardiff, Glamorganshire, Wales.
Son of Robert II Curthose; aided by Louis VI of France and Fulk of Anjou, attempted several times in vain to recover Normandy from Henry I of England, who had imprisoned Robert (1106); made count of Flanders by Louis (1127); killed by rival for Flanders, Thierry d' Alsace, at siege of Alost.
Oplaendinge, Jarl of the Uplands of Norway) was born 1062 in Normandy, France, and died 8 Mar 1134/35 in Marsilly, France.
www.bementfamily.com /report3b.htm   (16791 words)

  
 MSN Encarta - Multimedia - Normandy Invasion, 1944
American photographer Robert Capa photographed the invasion of Normandy, France, on June 6, 1944.
Known for his war photographs, Capa worked to capture the drama of an event rather than to create a technical masterpiece.
He continued to photograph battles until he was killed by a land mine in Vietnam in 1954.
encarta.msn.com /media_461524810/Normandy_Invasion_1944.html   (60 words)

  
 Ancestors of Eugene Ashton ANDREW & Anna Louise HANISH Duke Robert England NORMANDY, II ANDREW ANGERMUELLER HANISH ...
Robert was not able to excite any real insurrection in Normandy, but with the aid ofhis friends and of the French king he maintained a border war for some time, and defended castles with success against the king.
Robert of Belleme, who commanded the rear division, seeing the battle going againstthe duke, took to flight and left the rest of the army to its fate.
Robert wounded his father in the hand and unhorsed him, and wouldindeed have killed him but for a timely rescue by an Englishman, one Tokig of Wallingford, who remounted the overthrown conqueror.
www.geneal.net /1311.htm   (2267 words)

  
 CNN.com - AngloGold extends Normandy bid - December 17, 2001
Normandy chief Robert de Crespigny and his board have recommended that shareholders accept the Newmont offer.
Normandy executive chairman Robert de Crespigny and the board have recommended that shareholders reject AngloGold's offer in favor of Newmont.
Normandy shares were unchanged at midday Tuesday at A$1.81, after closing Monday at a 3-1/2 year high.
archives.cnn.com /2001/BUSINESS/asia/12/17/aust.anglo.biz   (373 words)

  
 Normans - William the Conqueror
William, the illegitimate son of Robert, Duke of Normandy, was born at Falaise Castle, Normandy, in 1027 or 1028.
He defended Normandy well from repeated attacks by the French and was feared as a military leader.
William was a distant cousin of the English King Edward the Confessor and claimed that Edward, who had no children, had promised him the throne of England.
www.historyonthenet.com /Normans/williamconqueror.htm   (237 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: William the Conqueror
William was the natural son of Robert, Duke of Normandy, his mother, Herleva, being the daughter of a tanner of Falaise.
He seems to have been a youth of clean life and of much natural piety, while the years of storm and stress through which he passed gave him an endurance and far-sighted resolution of character which lasted to his life's end.
Through the mediation of Lanfranc, the future archbishop, the union was legitimized by papal dispensation in 1059, but William and his wife consented to found two abbeys at Caen, by way of penance for their contumacy.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/15642c.htm   (1528 words)

  
 Normandy
With the exception of the larger Channel Islands, Normandy was permanently restored to France in 1450, and in 1499, Louis XII established a provincial
The Normandy Campaign: From D-Day to the Liberation of Paris.
Normandy Mining Limited Report On Activities for the Three Months Ended 30 September 1999.
www.infoplease.com /ce6/world/A0835890.html   (556 words)

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