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Topic: Robin Milner


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In the News (Tue 23 Jul 19)

  
  RANKINGSCRIPT.COM - Informationen über Robin Milner in der Kategorie Suchmaschinenoptimierung
Robin Milner (* 1934 in Plymouth) ist ein britischer Informatiker.
Milner erhielt den Turing-Preis für drei große Beiträge zur Informatik:
Ein Milner gewidmetes Informatikbuch, welches viele Bereiche seines Werks abdeckt.
www.rankingscript.com /artikel,de,Robin_Milner.html   (286 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Robin Milner Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Graduating from King's College, Cambridge in 1952, Milner first worked as a schoolteacher than as a programmer at Ferranti, before entering acad...
Graduating from King's College, Cambridge in 1952, Milner first worked as a schoolteacher than as a programmer at Ferranti, before entering academia at City University, London, then Swansea University, Stanford University, and from 1973 at Edinburgh University, before finally returning to Cambridge as the head of the Computer Laboratory in 1995.
An interview with Robin Milner; Martin Berger; 3 September 2003.
www.ipedia.com /robin_milner.html   (254 words)

  
 Amazin' Avenue :: A New York Mets Blog
Milner spent one season apiece at Double-A Memphis and Triple-A Tidewater, hitting for solid average and power at both stops, before getting called up to the Mets for a cup of coffee at the end of the 1971 season.
Milner reported to spring training with the Mets in 1972 and was named "rookie of the spring" after hitting.296 with three homeruns and 11 RBI.
I remember Milner clobbering some tremendous home runs, which, whenever it happened, would promt me to go running upstairs to excitedly interrupt my parents' dinner party or whatever was going on and regale them with details of how many people were on base and what the count was and so forth.
www.amazinavenue.com /story/2007/2/12/223036/051   (1560 words)

  
 Robin Milner -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Robin Milner -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article
Robin Milner is a prominent British (A scientist who specializes in the theory of computation and the design of computers) computer scientist.
In a very different area, Milner also developed a theoretical framework for analysing concurrent systems, the (Click link for more info and facts about calculus of communicating systems) calculus of communicating systems (CCS), and its successor, the (Click link for more info and facts about pi-calculus) pi-calculus.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/r/ro/robin_milner.htm   (138 words)

  
 DBLP: Robin Milner
Robin Milner, Joachim Parrow, David Walker: A Calculus of Mobile Processes, I. Inf.
Robin Milner: A Modal Characterisation of Observable Machine-Behaviour.
Matthew Hennessy, Robin Milner: On Observing Nondeterminism and Concurrency.
sunsite.informatik.rwth-aachen.de /dblp/db/indices/a-tree/m/Milner:Robin.html   (585 words)

  
 ROBIN MILNER FACTS AND INFORMATION
Graduating from King's_College,_Cambridge in 1952, Milner first worked as a schoolteacher then as a programmer at Ferranti, before entering academia at City_University, London, then Swansea_University, Stanford_University, and from 1973 at Edinburgh_University.
In a very different area, Milner also developed a theoretical framework for analyzing concurrent_systems, the Calculus_of_Communicating_Systems (CCS), and its successor, the pi-calculus.
He was made a Fellow of the Royal_Society in 1988 and received the ACM Turing_Award in 1991.
www.bellabuds.com /Robin_Milner   (193 words)

  
 categories: Robin Milner
Robin Milner, to whom this volume is dedicated, has been a cornerstone of the theoretical computer science world for the past three decades or so.
The early professional experiences of Milner were as a schoolteacher and as a programmer at Ferranti, both useful grounding for a computer science academic.
Milner's contributions to theoretical computer science have been in the areas of programming language semantics using domain theory, computer-assisted theorem proving, the programming language ML (standing for "Metalanguage") and, perhaps most significantly, concurrency.
north.ecc.edu /alsani/ct01(1-4)/msg00041.html   (1377 words)

  
 A History of Caml
ML was the meta-language of the Edinburgh version of the LCF proof assistant, both designed by Robin Milner.
It was implemented by a kind of interpreter written in Lisp by Mike Gordon, Robin Milner and Christopher Wadsworth.
Robin Milner thought it was a good moment to propose a new definition of ML in order to avoid divergence between various implementations.
caml.inria.fr /about/history.en.html   (1374 words)

  
 Interview with Robin Milner
Slashdot linked to a long interview with Robin Milner, creator of ML, and known for hindley-milner type inference.
I found it interesting to read about how he moved from one area of subfield of CS to another during the 50's and 60's.
I really enjoyed Milner's introductory book on the pi-calculus, Communicating and Mobile Systems: The Pi-Calculus, which is aimed at upper-level undergrads/beginner grads, so it was challenging in my first year of grad school but not impossible.
www.kimbly.com /blog/000283.html   (593 words)

  
 CoKa Talks   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Robin Milner will be receiving a DSc honorary degree from the University of Aarhus in recognition of his extraordinary research career, rich of stunningly innovative ideas and achievements in several different subjects.
It will be in three parts, touching upon three of the most important chapters of Robin Milner's pioneering activity: PCF and the full abstraction problem, ML and its type system, (mobile) processes and the pi-calculus.
Glynn Winskel will retrace Milner's work about the language PCF and the notion of full abstraction, a notion that has proved to be one of the hardest topics in semantics.
www.brics.dk /Activities/CoKa/CoKaTalks.html   (510 words)

  
 Selected Bibliography on Mobile Processes
Finally, a good (and currently essentially the only) source for a historical account is Milner's Turing Award Lecture, which discusses what led Milner to the introduction of CCS and pi-calculus (the latter done with his co-authors), including the philosophical backgrounds.
However Milner noted, in "Functions as Processes", that summation may not be always positioned as an indispensable operator in the presence of name passing.
This is closely related to Milner's reformulation of pi-calculi in the context of action structure (on which we discuss later).
lamp.epfl.ch /mobility/bib/honda.html   (5401 words)

  
 The Milner Lecture
Before he left Edinburgh for Cambridge, Robin Milner very kindly donated a sum of money to fund an annual lecture in Computer Science at the University of Edinburgh, to be given
The Milner Lecture takes place in the Summer term, and is a public lecture, open to all.
Robin Milner was one of the founding members and the first director of the Laboratory for Foundations of Computer Science.
www.lfcs.inf.ed.ac.uk /events/milner-lecture   (336 words)

  
 A page about process calculus
A lecture by Robin Milner, for the opening of the Computer Laboratory's William Gates Building at the University of Cambridge, on 1 May 2002.
Here, Robin expands upon the pi calculus and introduces the notions of ambients and bigraphs, in which the nesting of nodes represents locality, independently of the edges connecting them.
In this book Robin Milner introduces a new way of modeling communication which reflects his position.
www.fairdene.com /picalculus   (677 words)

  
 DBLP: Robin Milner
Robin Milner, Joachim Parrow, David Walker: A Calculus of Mobile Processes, II Inf.
Kim Guldstrand Larsen, Robin Milner: A Compositional Protocol Verification Using Relativized Bisimulation Inf.
Matthew Hennessy, Robin Milner: Algebraic Laws for Nondeterminism and Concurrency J.
www.informatik.uni-trier.de /~ley/db/indices/a-tree/m/Milner:Robin.html   (610 words)

  
 Pi-calculus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
In theoretical computer science, the π-calculus is a notation originally developed by Robin Milner, Joachim Parrow and David Walker to model concurrency (like λ-calculus is a simple model of sequential programming languages).
A higher order π-calculus can be defined where not names but processes are sent through channels.
Robin Milner : Communicating and Mobile Systems: the Pi-Calculus, Springer Verlag, ISBN 0521658691
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Pi-calculus.html   (565 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Books: Communication and Concurrency (Prentice Hall International Series in Computer Science)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
As one of the leading theoretical computer scientists in Britain, Robin Miller has produced an excellent book containing a well- judged mixture of theory and practical applications.
Milner presents a set of useful, complex theories concisely.
Professor Milner, If you are writing a book for students, it helps if you make it comprehensible.
www.amazon.com /exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0131150073?v=glance   (578 words)

  
 Mike Stannett: Theory of Distributed Systems (COM3190/COM6890) (http://www.dcs.shef.ac.uk/~mps/courses)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The 1989 Tutorial (Part 1): This is the first of a pair of technical reports produced by Robin Milner, Joachim Parrow and David Walker in 1989 (revised 1990), in which they described the first version of their pi-calculus.
The notation, and to some extent the focus, has changed over the intervening years, but in general this is still an excellent introduction to the topic.
Robin Milner, Joachim Parrow and David Walker (1989, revised 1990)
www.dcs.shef.ac.uk /~mps/courses/com3190/lecture05.html   (299 words)

  
 Robin Milner   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Robin Milner was appointed Professor of Computer Science at Cambridge UK in 1995, and was Head of the Computer Laboratory there from January 1996 to October 1999.
Before that he spent two years in the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at Stanford University, then 22 years in the Computer Science Department at the University of Edinburgh, where in 1986 he and colleagues founded the Laboratory for Foundation of Computer Science.
Some of this work is widely accessible through his book "Communication and Concurrency" (1989) and "Communicating and Mobile Systems (1999).
www.cse.ogi.edu /tphols2000/milner.htm   (236 words)

  
 From LCF to HOL   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Many of the developments of the last 25 years have been due to Robin Milner, whose influence on the field of automated reasoning has been diverse and profound.
The multi-faceted contribution of Robin Milner to the development of HOL is remarkable.
Code Milner wrote is still in use today, and the design of the hardware verification system LCF_LSM (a now obsolete stepping stone from LCF to HOL) was inspired by Milner's Calculus of Communicating Systems (CCS).
www.cl.cam.ac.uk /~mjcg/papers/HolHistory.html   (177 words)

  
 A brief history of Caml
ML was the meta-language of the Edinburgh version of the LCF proof assistant., designed by Robin Milner.
It was implemented by a kind of interpretor written in Lisp by Mike Gordon, Robin Milner and Christopher Wadsworth.
Robin Milner thought it was a good moment to propose a new definition of ML in ordre to avoid divergence between various implementations.
www.pps.jussieu.fr /~cousinea/Caml/caml_history.html   (1172 words)

  
 Calculi for Interactive Systems: Theory and Experiment   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
In current work Milner and a PhD student are examining the transitions and congruences generated for various pi-calculi, for comparison with the original theory of the calculus.
Gardner, Milner and Sewell play an active role internationally in the field of practically applicable models of interactive systems.
Milner led the team which originated the pi-calculus, and published the first text book on the topic in 1999; he recently gave invited talks on bigraphical reactive systems at leading conferences including POPL 2001 (London), CONCUR 2001 (Aalborg) and Petri Nets 2001 (Newcastle).
www.doc.ic.ac.uk /~pg/final2001.html   (4034 words)

  
 Computer Science: Official Opening
Cambridge University Professor Robin Milner FRS performed the opening ceremony, attended by alumni, staff and visitors.
Professor Robin Milner (Cambridge), and Mrs Lucy Milner.
The slate plaque commemorating the opening, as unveiled by Robin Milner.
www.swan.ac.uk /compsci/dept/opening/opening.html   (99 words)

  
 Robin Milner, Mads Tofte, and Robert Harper - The Definition of Standard ML   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Robin Milner, Mads Tofte, and Robert Harper - The Definition of Standard ML Robin Milner, Mads Tofte, and Robert Harper - The Definition of Standard ML This book presents the official, formal definition of the programming language ML, including the rules for grammar and static and dynamic semantics.
ML is the most well-developed and prominent of a new group of functional programming languages.
On the cutting edge of theoretical computer science, ML embodies the ideas of static typing and polymorphism and has also contributed a number of novel ideas to the design of programming languages.
www.diku.dk /topps/misc/tofte.def.ML.html   (95 words)

  
 LtU Classic Archives
Ada had something like the CSP or CCS version of communication, the "alt" command representing waiting for one of several different alternatives to happen, so you could see parallel composition sitting in there behind the scene if you look at it with a benevolent eye.
The "containing system" here is, I think, Milner's "real world"; but the relationship between a programming language, as a semantic system (though not just that), and the "real world" would not necessarily be one of correspondance, approximation or "modelling" but rather one of aptness or fitness for purpose.
So the "tension" Milner speaks of, between an analytic/reductionist and a systemic/expansionist approach, may be productive (or may not be necessarily as tense as is supposed).
lambda-the-ultimate.org /classic/message10126.html   (923 words)

  
 PL Seminar Talk for March 18th, 1997   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
-M 4:00 PM The pi calculus was defined by Milner, Parrow, and Walker as a "Calculus of Mobile Processes".
It provides an underlying formal model for interactive systems that can change their configuration on the fly; this spans a large spectrum from mobile telephone networks to Java-like languages.
If time allows, I shall briefly discuss the language PICT (for distributed interactive systems) based upon pi calculus by Pierce, and the application of pi calculus to model authentication protocols by Martin Abadi and Andrew Gordon.
www.cs.wisc.edu /areas/pl/seminar/spr97/mar18.html   (221 words)

  
 References - MLton Standard ML Compiler (SML Compiler)
Dave Berry, Robin Milner, and David N. Turner.
Lessons From the Design of a Standard ML Library.
Robin Milner, Mads Tofte, Robert Harper, and David MacQueen.
www.mlton.org /References   (1175 words)

  
 Citations: A theory of type polymorphism in programming - Milner (ResearchIndex)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Milner, R., A theory of type polymorphism in programming, Journal of Computer and System Sciences 17 (1978), pp.
Milner R. A theory of type polymorphism in programming.
Milner, A theory of type polymorphism in programming.
citeseer.ist.psu.edu /context/12543/0   (376 words)

  
 Books and other materials on Standard ML   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Robin Milner, Mads Tofte and Robert Harper, The Definition of Standard ML, MIT Press 1990, ISBN 0-262-63132-6.
Robin Milner, Mads Tofte, Robert Harper, and David B. MacQueen, The Definition of Standard ML (Revised), MIT Press 1997, ISBN 0-262-63181-4.
Robin Milner and Mads Tofte, Commentary on Standard ML, MIT Press 1991, ISBN 0-262-63137-7.
www.dina.kvl.dk /~sestoft/manual/node22.html   (247 words)

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