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Topic: Roger Cotes


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In the News (Sat 20 Jul 19)

  
  Roger Cotes
Roger Cotes accomplishments and life can be summed up as a great case of might have been.
Cotes concluded that the Newton's law of gravitation was confirmed by observation of celestial phenomenon and did not depend on unexplained occult forces which Cartesian critics alleged.
Cotes had discovered an important theorem on the nth roots of unity, foresaw the method of least squares, and he discovered a method for integrating rational fractions with binomial denominators.
numericalmethods.eng.usf.edu /anecdotes/cotes.html   (655 words)

  
 Cotes biography
Roger later attended the famous St Paul's School in London, but he continued to be advised by his uncle and the two exchanged letters on mathematical topics during the time that Roget spent at school in London.
Cotes was particularly pleased with his rectification of the logarithmic curve as he made clear in a letter to his friend William Jones in 1712.
Cotes discovered an important theorem on the nth roots of unity, gave the continued fraction expansion of e, invented radian measure of angles, anticipated the method of least squares, published graphs of tangents and secants, and discovered a method of integrating rational fractions with binomial denominators.
www-history.mcs.st-and.ac.uk /history/Biographies/Cotes.html   (1632 words)

  
 Roger Cotes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Roger Cotes (Burbage, Leicestershire July 10, 1682 – June 5, 1716 in Cambridge, Cambridgeshire) was an English mathematician.
Roger Cotes is known for working closely with Isaac Newton by proofreading the second edition of his famous book Principia before publication.
Cotes began his professional educational career with a particular focus on astronomy.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Roger_Cotes   (731 words)

  
 Roger Cotes Biography | World of Mathematics
Cotes was born in Burbage, England, the son of the Reverend Robert Cotes and his wife, Grace.
Cotes was admitted as a scholarship student to Trinity College in Cambridge in 1699.
Cotes died from a fever at the age of 33.
www.bookrags.com /biography/roger-cotes-wom   (699 words)

  
 Untitled Document   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Presentation of John Cotes, chaplain, to the church of All Saints, Helmeswell, in the diocese of Lincoln, void by the resignation of William Estby.
Cotes Hall is the seat of JJ Matthews, Esq, and Aspley belongs to James Deakin, Esq.
A second time, Thomas Cotes and his wife were arrested and brought to the Marshalsea prison for being outlaws and not appearing before the king concerning the unlawful eviction of the manor of Brocton.
www.uiowa.edu /~c030149a/Claycamp/cotes.htm   (3080 words)

  
 Roger Cotes Biography | scit_04123_package.xml
Cotes was born in Burbage, England, in 1682, son of the Reverend Robert and Grace Cotes.
Cotes became friends with Newton, and the two men corresponded on subjects such as telescopes, clocks, and the movement of heavenly bodies.
Cotes, who received no financial remuneration for his years of labor on the project, wrote a preface in which he defended Newton's ideas on empirical grounds.
www.bookrags.com /biography/roger-cotes-scit-04123   (412 words)

  
 Cotes
Roger Cotes was a Fellow of Trinity College Cambridge in 1707.
Cotes was particularly pleased with his rectification of the logarithmic curve as he makes clear in a letter to his friend William
Cotes discovered an important theorem on the nth roots of unity, anticipated the method of least squares and discovered a method of integrating rational fractions with binomial denominators.
www.educ.fc.ul.pt /icm/icm2003/icm14/Cotes.htm   (264 words)

  
 Harmonia Mensurarum
Cotes was the newly appointed professor of astronomy at Trinity College, a position he had gained with Bentley's support.
Cotes died at the age of 34, prompting Newton to make the famous remark that "if he had lived, we might have known something".
Cotes, however, supplies me a ready-made title, in his "Harmonia Mensurarum," and there is no reason why I should not be fluent, at least, upon the fluents of fractional expressions.
www.mathpages.com /home/kmath192/kmath192.htm   (2316 words)

  
 Cotes
Roger Cotes was an English mathematician who edited the second edition of Newton's Principia...
Cotes' Spiral -- from MathWorld Cotes' Spiral -- from MathWorld A spiral that gives the solution to the central orbit problem under a radial force law \ddot\mathbf{r}= -\mu\left\vert{\mathbf{r}}\right\vert^{-3}\hat\mathbf{r}, where \mu is a...
Cotes, Roger (1682-1716) English mathematician who worked with Newton in the preparation of the...
www.321wine.com /wines/cotes.php   (953 words)

  
 Untitled Document   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
The like Thomas Cotes, of the county of Salop, for not appearing to answer Philip Holgot, Roger Berde and John Gantron, executors of the will of John de Lanton, kinght, and Roger Collying and Alianorn his wife, co-executrix of the said Philip, Roger and John, and return 40 marks unjustly detained.
Pardons of Outlawry : Thomas Cotes of the county of Salop for not appearing to answer John Buterlegh of Salisbury clothier, touching a debt of 20l.
Revocation of protection for half a year, with clause volumus, dated 8 September, granted to Thomas Cotes, going to Brittany in the compnay of Thomas de Percy, on certificate of the sheriffs of London that he has not gone but is in the city on his own affairs.
www.uiowa.edu /~c030149a/Claycamp/tomcotes.htm   (323 words)

  
 Roger Cotes - Natural Philosopher - Cambridge University Press   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Roger Cotes (1682-1716) was the first Plumian Professor of Astronomy and Experimental Philosophy, at Trinity College, Cambridge.
Cotes died young and published only one paper, the Logometria, during his lifetime; a translation of this paper is given in the Appendix.
Dr Gowing discusses Cotes' work in some detail but has written the work in such a way that the more technical aspects of the mathematics can be omitted at first reading whilst still giving a clear idea of Cotes' achievement.
www.cambridge.org /uk/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=0521526493   (219 words)

  
 [No title]
He held a variety of college posts, and in 1716, on the death of Cotes, was elected to succeed him as Plumian Professor, a position he retained until 1760.
Smith, like his cousin Cotes, was throughout life the 'decided partizan' of Richard Bentley, the master of Trinity, in his struggles with the fellows.
Smith's father, John Smith, was rector of the parish of Lea; his mother, Hannah Smith, was the aunt of Roger Cotes, Plumian professor of astronomy at Cambridge.
www.europa.com /~telscope/smith-r.txt   (3271 words)

  
 Newton's Philosophy (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)
Although Cotes was one of Newton's ablest defenders, his role as what we might call a Newtonian spokesperson did not prevent him from challenging Newton on occasion, nor from interpreting the implications of Newton's theory of gravity in a way that may have been at odds with Newton's preferred interpretation.
If Cotes has the ordinary, rather than the technical, meaning in mind, then gravity's cause is something that we could, as far as his discussion is concerned, hope to discover, even if we do not yet know it in 1713.
If Cotes has the technical sense in mind, however, then gravity's cause is obviously not something that we could hope to discover, not because it is hidden or microscopic, but because it is not intelligible and therefore not the sort of thing that could be discovered.
plato.stanford.edu /entries/newton-philosophy   (7624 words)

  
 Roger Cotes   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Roger Cotes born July 10, 1682 in Burbage, Leicestershire, England died June 5, 1716 in Cambridge, Cambridgeshire was a mathematician.
Roger Cotes is known for working closely with Isaac Newton by proofreading his famous book Principia before publication.
He also invented the quadrature formulas known as Newton-Cotes formulas.
bopedia.com /en/wikipedia/r/ro/roger_cotes.html   (61 words)

  
 §7. His Reforms at Cambridge. XIII. Scholars and Antiquaries. Vol. 9. From Steele and Addison to Pope and Swift. ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Thus, the first lectures delivered by Vigani as professor of chemistry (1702) were given in a laboratory (then called an elaboratory) fitted up by Bentley in the rooms now occupied by the bursar at Trinity.
For Roger Cotes, Newton’s greatest pupil, he built an observatory over the central gate of the college.
His urgent pressure induced the reluctant Newton to prepare the second and improved edition of the Principia, in 1713; and he himself defrayed the cost of the publication.
www.bonus.com /contour/bartlettqu/http@@/www.bartleby.com/219/1307.html   (532 words)

  
 Cotes Coat of Arms
As a surname, it comes from their residence at "the cotes," a township in Count Stafford.
The word Cote is derived from the Old English word "cote," which refers to a "cottage."
Cotes is also a Sept of the Clan MacDonald
www.houseofnames.com /xq/asp.c/qx/cotes-coat-arms.htm   (1364 words)

  
 COTES, ROGER (1682-1716) - Online Information article about COTES, ROGER (1682-1716)
Maclaurin, and a discussion of the curves known as " Cotes' Spirals," which occur as the path of a particle described under the See also:
In 1738 Dr Robert Smith published Cotes' Hydro-statical and Pneumatical Lectures, a work which was held in great estimation.
Isaac Newton said, " If Mr Cotes had lived, we should have known something." COTES-DU-See also:
encyclopedia.jrank.org /COR_CRE/COTES_ROGER_1682_1716_.html   (1270 words)

  
 Cotes Family Crest
In continental Europe, the most ancient recorded family crest was discovered upon the monumental effigy of a Count of Wasserburg in the church of St. Emeran, at Ratisobon, Germany...
In the Cotes coat of arms as in all coat of arms the crest is only one element of the full armorial achievement.
We encourage you to study the Cotes genealogy to find out if you descend from someone who bore a particular family crest.
www.houseofnames.com /xq/asp.fc/qx/cotes-family-crest.htm?a=54323-224   (601 words)

  
 Home of Tetration - History
It was later found, that Euler was not the first to discover the formula that now bears his name.
It was first proved, in an obscure form, by Roger Cotes in 1714.
Cotes is also known for working with Isaac Newton during the publication of his major work, Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica, commonly referred to as "The Principia."
tetration.itgo.com /hist.html   (812 words)

  
 betting on Roger Laurent   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Roger Penske, Roger Williamson, Roland Flockhart, Rolf Stommelen, Ron Ratzenberger.
In Vegas it dollars him two days, Moore five hundred took a pop at a two-time world champion and Roger betting (not to be confused with the actor), Gambling politics state government and of business the betting big business and hidden networks / Laurent Eric translated by Andrew Brown.
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www.officialsportsbetting.com /motorsports/betting-on-Roger-Laurent.php   (844 words)

  
 Roger Cotes edited the second edition of the Principia
Roger Cotes edited the second edition of the Principia
Roger Cotes edited the second edition of the
Now the mutual and mutually equal attraction of bodies is a branch of the third Law of Motion, and how this branch is deduced from Phaenomena you may see at the end of the Corollaries of the Laws of Motion, pag.
homepages.wmich.edu /~mcgrew/ntoc.htm   (131 words)

  
 Newton-Cotes formulas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In numerical analysis, the Newton-Cotes formulas, also called the Newton-Cotes rules, are a group of formulas for numerical integration (also called quadrature) based on evaluating the integrand at n+1 equally-spaced points.
They are named after Isaac Newton and Roger Cotes.
However, for large n a Newton-Cotes rule can sometimes suffer from catastrophic Runge's phenomena where the error diverges exponentially for large n.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Newton-Cotes_formulas   (494 words)

  
 Cancer Decisions - Free Newsletter -September 12, 2004
Although it was written almost three hundred years ago, Cotes’ aphorism still rings true today because it speaks of the fallibility of human nature, and the tendency of scientists and philosophers alike to confuse hypothesis with fact.
It was not only in Newton’s day that scientists fell blindly in love with ideas and selectively ignored data that might have shaken their convictions.
But, as you will see, even though a group as prominent and respected as NSABP was able to cast doubt on the value of this form of treatment in early colon cancer, many other equally prominent medical voices have been raised in defense of the status quo.
www.cancerdecisions.com /091204_page.html   (2569 words)

  
 [Newton, Isaac], PHILOSOPHIÆ NATURALIS PRINCIPIA MATHEMATICA Auctore Isaaco Newtono, Equite Aurato. Edition Secunda ...
"Richard Bentley, Master of Trinity College, was instrumental in bringing out this second edition, which was edited by Roger Cotes, F.R.S. In his important preface, Cotes attacks the Cartesian philosophy then still in vogue in the universities, and refutes an assertion that Newton's theory of attraction is a causa occulta.
Few could grasp Newton's reasoning at the time, and his fame was spread on the Continent by Voltaire's ELEMENS DE LA PHILOSOPHIE DE NEUTON, 1738" (PMM).
Roger Cotes, 1682-1716, "was not only able enough to see where Principia could be improved, but also able to criticise Newton and correct his errors without ever antagonising him - no mean feat...
www.polybiblio.com /bud/19328.html   (505 words)

  
 TAYLOR, Brook; COTES, Roger., Methodus incrementorum directa & inversa. (bound with) Philosophical Transactions, Volume ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
TAYLOR, Brook; COTES, Roger., Methodus incrementorum directa & inversa.
Cotes (1682-1716) here cleverly demonstrates the two methods for computing logarithms for any given number, which he then generally applies to a great number of problems, including arc lengths, atmospheric density, quadratures, and the attraction of bodies.
This item is listed on Bibliopoly by B.
www.polybiblio.com /blroot/4371.html   (193 words)

  
 Birthday Calendar Dates
Death of Roger Cotes, on this day in 1716.
  Cotes was one of those mathematicians, like Pascal and Galois, who died at an early age and who showed remarkable promise in their field.
  Cotes died of a violent fever at the age of 33.
www.math.utsa.edu /~fnorman/4123/birthdates.htm   (1713 words)

  
 Roger Cotes - Natural Philosopher - Cambridge University Press   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Roger Cotes - Natural Philosopher - Cambridge University Press
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 Untitled
Tom Richmond - A Geometric Theorem of Roger Cotes
Tom Richmond (Western Kentucky University) - A Geometric Theorem of Roger Cotes
An amazingly simple answer follows from a theorem of Newton's contemporary Roger Cotes.
www.wku.edu /~david.benko/schedule.htm   (2782 words)

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