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Topic: Roman Curia


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  ROMAN CURIA
There are a number of departments of the Roman Curia, each with their own responsibilities and competencies.
This Commission is charged with assisting the various Dicasteries of the Roman Curia by studying the life of the Church and its development in Latin America.
This is a tribunal of appeal from the Tribunal of the Roman Rota.
www.thesacredheart.com /curia.htm   (1714 words)

  
  The roman curia as the heart of the vatican government   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The roman Curia is composed by around 20 residential cardinals who are living in the vatican state although the total number of the cardinals is about 195 members.
The Roman Curia is the collective name for the complex of secretariats, congregations, tribunals, councils and offices which assists the pope in the exercise of his pastoral office of service to the churches which make up the Roman catholic communion.
Within the Curia, the Secretary of the State is the coordinating office with authority over both the church's internal and external affairs.
www.romanguide.com /vaticancity/rome-curia-vatican.html   (463 words)

  
  NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Roman Curia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Roman Curia can also be loosely compared to cabinets in governments of countries with a Western form of governance, though it only includes a Foreign 'ministry' (the Secetary of State), the secular interal affairs being handled by separate institutions of the Vatican City State, unlike the earlier Papal States.
The Roman Curia was originally established in the 16th Century by Pope Sixtus V with the bull Immensa Aeterni Dei on 22 January 1588.
The Roman Curia is the complex of the organs and the authorities that constitute the administrative apparatus of the Holy See, coordinating and providing the necessary organisation for the correct functioning of the Roman Catholic Church and the achievement of its goals.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Roman-Curia   (3093 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Roman Curia
Curia), in addition to which something will be said of the commissions of cardinals and the pontifical family.
Curia are three: the Sacred Penitentiaria, the Sacred Roman Rota, and the Apostolic Signatura.
According to some authorities, from the seventh century, that is from the pontificate of Benedict II, the penitentiary of the Roman Church was a cardinal priest; this was certainly the case before Gregory X (d.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/13147a.htm   (6978 words)

  
 Roman Curia information - Search.com
The Roman Curia (sometimes, if inaccurately, called the Vatican) is the administrative apparatus of the Holy See, coordinating and providing the necessary organisation for the correct functioning of the Roman Catholic Church and the achievement of its goals.
Curia in medieval and later Latin usage means "court" in the sense of "royal court" rather than "court of law" (though those two meanings are related in history).
The Roman Curia, then, is the Papal Court, and assists the Pope in carrying out his functions.
www.search.com /reference/Roman_Curia   (630 words)

  
 Roman Curia
According to the Constitution "Sapienti consilio" of Pius X, the tribunals of the Curia are three: the Sacred Penitentiaria, the Sacred Roman Rota, and the Apostolic Signatura.
According to some authorities, from the seventh century, that is from the pontificate of Benedict II, the penitentiary of the Roman Church was a cardinal priest; this was certainly the case before Gregory X (d.
The primacy of the Roman See made it necessary that the sovereign pontiff should have in his service officers to write and to transmit his answers to the numerous petitions for favours and to the numerous consultations addressed to him.
www.catholicity.com /encyclopedia/c/curia,roman.html   (6252 words)

  
  Roman Curia
The Roman Curia is the complex of the organs and the authorities that constitute the administrative apparatus of the Holy See, coordinating and providing the necessary organisation for the correct functioning of the Roman Catholic Church and the achievement of its goals.
The Roman Curia, then, is the Papal Court, and assists the Pope in carrying out his functions.
In this sense, the Roman Curia has grown little by little in the history of Catholic Church, its importance reaching an apogee during the later times of Papacy's temporal power, de facto ended in 19th century (with the unification of Italy) and later formally too concluded in 1929 (with Lateran Pacts, or Concordato).
www.black-science.org /wikipedia/r/ro/roman_curia.html   (456 words)

  
 Audit - LoveToKnow 1911   (Site not responding. Last check: )
From this time the powers of the auditores increased until the reform of the curia by Sixtus V., when the creation of the congregations of cardinals for specific purposes tended gradually to withdraw from the Rota its most important functions.
It still, however, ranks as the supreme court of justice in the papal curia, and, as members of it, the auditores enjoy special privileges.
In 1485, by a bull of Innocent VIII., he was given extensive jurisdiction over all civil and criminal causes arising in the curia, or appealed to it from the papal territories.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /audit   (997 words)

  
 The St. Joseph Foundation - Canonical Issues
, because of the Roman primacy the pope is by divine law the judge of the universal Church and final court of appeal for all cases.
The fourth period starts with the reorganization of the Roman Curia by St. Pius X in 1908 with the Constitution, , which is a providential step backwards towards proper procedure in appeals, followed nine years later by a half step in the wrong direction again with the Code of Canon Law in 1917.
As the present policy of the Roman congregations is that of nearly always rejecting recourses made against episcopal decisions, the Signatura is at present submerged with cases.
www.st-joseph-foundation.org /ci-romanappeals.htm   (3395 words)

  
 Asia Times: Saints, imperialists, the Catholic Church and China
The Roman Curia has taken a new round of actions to reflect upon itself, reportedly to "purify the memory" of the Roman Catholic Church in order to salute the beginning of the third millennium in the history of Christianity.
On March 7, 2000, the eve of the Catholic Quadragesima, the Roman Curia published a document entitled "Remembrance and Reparation: the Church and its Errors", which summarized the past errors of the Church from a theological standpoint and appealed for forgiveness.
In 1934, Roman Pope Pius XI hastily declared acknowledgement of Manchukuo and severed, for a special purpose, the Northeast from the missionary district of China by establishing a separate Northeast missionary district in line with the Manchukuo territory.
www.atimes.com /china/CF02Ad03.html   (2384 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Roman Catholic Church Article   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Patriarch of the Roman Catholic Church is the Pope.
The historic Roman Catholic position (as well as that of the Orthodox and other ancient churches), is that women cannot be priests or bishops, because priests and bishops are successors to the Apostles, and that in the sacrifice of the Eucharist the priest acts in representation of Christ.
Within Roman Catholicism itself, debate on the subject now focuses on whether this statement is meant to invoke extraordinary papal infallibility (see the concept of the extraordinary magisterium) and raise the rule that women cannot be Roman Catholic priests to the level of an irreformable dogma of the Roman Catholic Church.
www.ipedia.com /roman_catholic_church_1.html   (4338 words)

  
 Roman Catholic Church - Gurupedia
Three other Roman Catholic bishops use the title Patriarch, the Patriarchs of Venice, Lisbon, and the West Indies, but they are not patriarchs in the strict sense, that is the head of a church, and are thus honorary patriarchs.
The historic Roman Catholic position (as well as that of the Orthodox and other ancient churches), is that women cannot be priests or bishops, because priests and bishops are successors to the Apostles, and that in the sacrifice of the Eucharist the priest acts in representation of Christ.
Within Roman Catholicism itself, debate on the subject now focuses on whether this statement is meant to invoke extraordinary papal infallibility (see the concept of the extraordinary magisterium) and raise the rule that women cannot be Roman Catholic priests to the level of an irreformable dogma of the Roman Catholic Church.
www.gurupedia.com /r/ro/roman_catholic_church.htm   (4112 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for curia
The ruler and curia made policy decisions (as on war, treaties, finances, church relations), and under a powerful ruler the curia often became active as a court of...
Cu·ri·a / ˈkyoŏrēə / the papal court at the Vatican, by which the Roman Catholic Church is governed.
The curia is the pope.' (Paulo Evaristo Arns of Sao Paulo, Brazil)
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=curia   (868 words)

  
 Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Roman curia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Curia in medieval and later Latin usage means "court" in the sense of "royal court" rather than "court of law" (though those two meanings are related in history).
After this act, the Curia obviously does not care any more about the administration of the Stato Pontificio (which territory has had a wide extension over current central Italy), at least due to its reduced national dimensions that would not require such an apparatus, now therefore mainly dedicated to support the Pope's action.
The Secretariat of State (Secretaria Apostolica) - created in the 15th century, it is the dicastery of the closest assistants of the Pope.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/ro/Roman_curia   (481 words)

  
 Roman Curia Information
The Roman Curia - usually (though inaccurately) called the Vatican - is the administrative apparatus of the Holy See, coordinating and providing the necessary organisation for the correct functioning of the Roman Catholic Church and the achievement of its goals.
By this act, the Roman Curia gave up any claim to an administrative role in the defunct Papal States, though it has such with regard to the successor Vatican City State.
In exercising supreme, full, and immediate power in the universal Church, the Roman pontiff makes use of the departments of the Roman Curia which, therefore, perform their duties in his name and with his authority for the good of the churches and in the service of the sacred pastors.
www.bookrags.com /wiki/Roman_Curia   (587 words)

  
 Roman Curia: When we hear the word "Curia", most of us in Rome think of its modern use to describe the ensemble of ...
In ancient Roman times, the Curia was the group of structures that housed the Senate, and, even then, it was also used to describe the bureaucracy surrounding the Senate.
The Curia building that is now shown in the forum incorporates the remains of several generations of the main building, the Senate meeting hall, in the ancient Roman Senate compound.
On display inside the Curia today, but not part of the original structure, are the Plutei Traiani, which are carved stone balustrades which were placed by Trajan either on the edge of the rostrum or on the sides of the fl pavement marking the underground "Tomb of Romulus".
www.mmdtkw.org /VRomanCuria.html   (681 words)

  
 Outlines of Roman History, Chapter 3
The Roman Family.—The smallest group of Roman society was the family, which the early Romans regarded as the most important and sacred of all human institutions.
Every Roman looked with pride upon his family and the deeds of his ancestors; and it was regarded as a great calamity for the family worship to become extinct.
It was a collection of curiae which had united for purposes of common defense and had come to form quite a distinct and well-organized community, like that which had settled upon the Palatine hill, and also like the Sabine community which had settled upon the Quirinal.
www.forumromanum.org /history/morey03.html   (1581 words)

  
 Catholic Culture : Document Library : The Roman Curia and the Ecumenical Council
The term "Roman Curia" is used to designate the complex of congregations, tribunals, and offices which exist to aid the Pope in his government of the universal Church militant of Jesus Christ.
The Roman Pontiff himself is the prefect of three of the congregations, the Holy Office, the Consistorial Congregation, and the Congregation for the Oriental Church.
When the Roman Curia is opposed on these grounds it is obvious that the accusation is made by an individual who has at least some sort of sympathy for the theses which the Holy Office has rejected over the course of the past few years.
catholicculture.org /docs/doc_view.cfm?recnum=2930   (4609 words)

  
 Roman Curia - Definition, explanation
The Roman Curia is the administrative apparatus of the Holy See, coordinating and providing the necessary organisation for the correct functioning of the Roman Catholic Church and the achievement of its goals.
In this sense, the Roman Curia has grown little by little in the history of the Catholic Church, its importance reaching an apogee during the later times of Papacy's temporal power, de facto ended in 19th century (with the unification of Italy) and later formally too concluded in 1929 with the Lateran Treaties, or Concordato.
After this act, the Curia obviously does not care any more about the administration of the Stati Pontificii (the extensive Papal States in central Italy), and is now mainly dedicated to the support of the Pope's ecclesiastical responsibilities.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/r/ro/roman_curia.php   (1032 words)

  
 Roman Catholic Church, Catholicism
The Roman Catholic church, the largest of the Christian churches, although present in all parts of the world, is identified as Roman because of its historical roots in Rome and because of the importance it attaches to the worldwide ministry of the bishop of Rome, the pope.
The Roman Catholic church's prohibition of remarriage after divorce is the strictest of the Christian churches, although the church does admit the possibility of annulments for marriages judged to be invalid.
In the last two centuries the Roman Catholic church has taught as official doctrine that Mary from her conception was kept free of original sin (the Immaculate Conception) and that at the completion of her life was taken up body and soul into heaven (the Assumption).
mb-soft.com /believe/txc/rcatholi.htm   (3897 words)

  
 The Curia (Roman Senate House)
Because the first Curia, the Curia Hostilia, was founded by the third legendary king of Rome, Tullus Hostilius, the plan was laid sacred and accuracy in shape had to be preserved.
The difference between the fa├žade of S. Adriano and the Diocletian Curia shows the gradual elevation of soil which occurred in the Middle Ages; for the entrance was twice raised so that the sill of the 19th century S. Adriano door lay at the height of the lintel of the Diocletian door.
Parker assumed that the Curia was in the basement of the Tabularium on the Capitoline Hill.
www.ancientworlds.net /aw/Article/813842   (3284 words)

  
 Rome, the ROMAN FORUM - Foro Romano, the ancient Roman Forum centre of Rome's social and political life
This arch is famous especially for its celebration of Titus' quashing of the Jewish revolt of 70 AD, which brought to the destruction of the Temple of Jerusalem, still mourned by the Jews up till now.
In addition to the domination of the Jews' homeland, the Romans paid little respect for their religion, and expected them to worship their emperors as gods.
As you will visit the Roman Senate you will inevitably be brought to recall the countless historical events in which Senators decided the fate of Rome.
www.romanhomes.com /your_roman_vacation/quarters/roman-forum.htm   (748 words)

  
 Roman Curia - InformationBlast
Curia in medieval and later Latin usage means "court" in the sense of "royal court" rather than "court of law"(though those two meanings are related in history).
After this act, the Curia obviously does not care any more about the administration of the Stati Pontificii (the extensive Papal States in central Italy), at least due to its reduced national dimensions that would not require such an apparatus, now therefore mainly dedicated to support the Pope's action.
For the Diocese of Rome, these functions are not handled by the Roman Curia, but by the Vicariate General of His Holiness for the City of Rome, as provided by the Apostolic Constitition Ecclesia in Urbe.
www.informationblast.com /Roman_curia.html   (558 words)

  
 CURIA ROMANA - Online Information article about CURIA ROMANA
The constituent parts of the Roman Curia fall essentially into two classes: (I) the tribunals and offices, which for centuries Dtv;s;on.
June 1908, proceeded to a general reorganization of the Roman Curia: Congregations, tribunals and offices.
Inquisition, Roman and universal, or Holy Office (Sacra Congregatio Romanae et universalis Inquisitions seu Sancti Officii), the first of the Congregations, hence called the supreme.
encyclopedia.jrank.org /CRE_DAH/CURIA_ROMANA.html   (6162 words)

  
 Roman Curia
The Roman Curia (sometimes, if inaccurately, called the Vatican) is the administrative apparatus of the Holy See, coordinating and providing the necessary organisation for the correct functioning of the Catholic Church and the achievement of its goals.
An agreement was reached on this issue when in 1929 the Holy See concluded the Lateran Treaties with the Italian State, which had since 1919 occupied the whole of the peninsula, plus Sicily and Sardinia.
By this act, the Roman Curia gave up any claim to an administrative role in the defunt Papal States, though it has such with regard to the successor Vatican City State.
www.savage-comedy.com /_Roman_Curia   (595 words)

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