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Topic: Roman dictator


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  Roman dictator - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The dictator was the highest magistrate in degree of precedence (Praetor Maximus) and was attended by 24 lictors.
When a dictator was considered necessary, the Senate passed a senatus consultum that one of the consuls should nominate a dictator; and without a previous decree of the senate the consuls had not the power of naming a dictator.
There was no appeal from the sentence of the dictator (unless the dictator changed his mind), and accordingly the lictors bore the axes in the fasces before them even in the city, as a symbol of their absolute power over the lives of the citizens.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Roman_dictator   (2230 words)

  
 Dictator - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
However unlike the original Roman dictators, modern dictators do not give themselves the title "dictator"; it is generally used by their opponents as a term of abuse for totalitarian rule, just like despot and tyrant (also unlike their counterparts in antiquity).
Roman dictators were usually experienced generals and politicians, were invested with sweeping authority over the citizens, but they were originally limited to a term of six months and lacked power over the public finances.
The benevolent dictator is a more modern version of the classical "enlightened despot," being an absolute ruler who exercises his or her political power for the benefit of the people rather than exclusively for his or her own benefit.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Dictator   (1804 words)

  
 [No title]
Romans engaged in a battle with the Latins.
The Roman army under the command of the military tribunes Q. Servius Fidenas, Q. Sulpicius and P. Cornelius Maluginensis are defeated by the Gauls, led by King Brennus.
284 BC - The Gallic raiders are forcibly ejected from the ager Gallicus by the Romans.
www.novaroma.org /camenaeum/RomanTimeline.txt   (25003 words)

  
 Roman dictator information - Search.com
The dictator was the highest magistrate in degree of precedence (Praetor Maximus) and was attended by 24 lictors.
When a dictator was considered necessary, the Senate passed a senatus consultum that one of the consuls should nominate a dictator; and without a previous decree of the senate the consuls had not the power of naming a dictator.
There was no appeal from the sentence of the dictator (unless the dictator changed his mind), and accordingly the lictors bore the axes in the fasces before them even in the city, as a symbol of their absolute power over the lives of the citizens.
domainhelp.search.com /reference/Roman_dictator   (2275 words)

  
 Dictator - Voyager, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
However unlike the Roman original, they rarely use it as a title, for it is generally used by their opponents as a term of abuse for totalitarian rule, just like despot and tyrant (also unlike Antiquity).
In modern usage, the term "dictator" is generally used to describe a leader who holds an extraordinary amount of personal power, especially the power to make laws without effective restraint by a legislative assembly.
Monarchs and military dictators are also excluded from these definitions, because their rule relies on the consent of other political powers (the barons or the army).
www.voyager.in /Dictator   (1343 words)

  
 Roman Gods
Roman gods originated in the ancient "village" of Rome as the faceless and formless deities that supported farmers in their efforts with the land.
Roman gods began taking on the forms that we would recognize today during the dynasty of the Etruscan kings that ruled the city of Rome in the 6th century BC.
The Roman Republic was ruled by two chief magistrates, each of whom was elected to a one-year term.
www.allabouthistory.org /roman-gods.htm   (911 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Dictatorship   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Originally a legitimate military office in the Roman Republic, the dictator was given his powers by the Senate (see Roman dictator).
Often, a dictator creates what is known as a family dictatorship in which leadership of the country passes to the dictator's son, brother, or other realitve after his death.
Dictator Charles King of Liberia for example once claimed to have been "re-elected" by a majority that was more than 15% larger than his country's entire electorate and Saddam Hussein claimed 100% voter turnout in a ballot on his rule.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Dictatorship   (1047 words)

  
 Fall of the Roman Republic
It was a culmination of several individual actions or achievements, coupled with social conditions that weighed heavily on Roman society.
Periods of stability were mixed in with those of near collapse while powerful generals or inciters of the Roman mob jockeyed for position.
Beginning with the Punic Wars and Roman conquest outside of Italy, followed by massive importation of slaves, the face of Roman life was changing far more rapidly than the governing body could deal with.
www.unrv.com /roman-republic/fall-of-roman-republic.php   (680 words)

  
 Roman dictator   (Site not responding. Last check: )
A legal innovation of the Roman Republic, the ''dictator'' (Latin for "one who dictates (orders)") — also known as the ''Praetor maximus'' ("The supreme Praetor") ''magister populi'' ("master of the peoples") — was an extraordinary magistrate (''magistratus extraordinarius'') whose function was to perform extraordinary tasks exceeding the authority of any of the ordinary magistrates.
This dictator held absolute military and civil power in the State, and was obligated to appoint as his deputy a master of the horse (''magister equitum'').
After the end of the war, the Dictatoship was outlawed, replaced with the ''senatus consultam ultimum'', an emergency act of the Senate that authorized the two consuls to take whatever actions were needed to defend the Republic.
www.infothis.com /find/Roman_dictator   (804 words)

  
 Dictator
A consul or (in emergency situations) praetor could appoint a dictator; this proposal could not be vetoed.
After 202, the dictatorship was abolished; in emergency situations, the Senate gave extraordinary powers to the consuls (the senatusconsultum ultimum, the proclamation of the state of emergency).
Every year, the Romans appointed a dictator whose only task it was to fix a nail to the wall of the temple of Jupiter (the meaning of this ritual is unclear).
www.livius.org /di-dn/dictator/dictator.html   (352 words)

  
 [No title]
Roman armies under Roman generals had to travel to these lands, defeat armies, remove governments and establish their own government and culture which they protected through the presence of an army and the threat of war.
Dictators impose their will upon their own nation and other nations which are not weak enough to resist them.
Dictators must impose their control over conquered regions (and sometimes their own country) by force of arms, and even these efforts are not always successful.
www.geocities.com /dmathew1/hal3.htm   (4157 words)

  
 The Roman Legions
Roman legions defended the imperial frontiers from the Scottish border to the deserts of Arabia, from the Danube to the Atlas mountains in northern Africa.
The Romans were especially expert at clever and speedy field maneuvers and the ancient art of siege warfare.
The soldiers were so good that the Romans even found them to be their best weapon at sea: they equipped their galleys with a combination grappling hook/gangplank which both snared the enemy and enabled the infantry to board.
www.culturalresources.com /Romleg.html   (913 words)

  
 Caesar Assassinated!!
In a meeting of the senate, the beloved and revered roman dictator, Gaius Julius Caesar was savagely murdered.
The Roman officials have not released many details but they do say that they are holding Marcus, Junius, Brutus, Gaius, and Cassius along with other senators on account that a witness had seen the group with Caesar just moments before his death.
Caesar became a Roman hero and that is why his death came as such a shock to practically all of the roman citizens.
www.dl.ket.org /sampler/latinpg   (317 words)

  
 BBC - h2g2 - Julius Caesar - Roman Dictator
This was a rather turbulent province and afforded Caesar the excuse for looting towns and plundering the silver mines of Gallic.
The Romans held a great dislike of kings - the expulsion of the Tarquin Royal Family was a major historical moment to the Roman mind.
Conversely, scholar Peter Wiseman (in his Roman Drama and Roman History, Exeter University Press, 1998, 61-63) has pointed out that 'anerriphthô kubos' is a proverb as well as a quote from Menander, and that Suetonius might have been quoting from a play about Caesar's crossing of the Rubicon.
www.bbc.co.uk /dna/h2g2/A531767   (2598 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/40s BC
Civil war in Roman Republic between Julius Caesar and forces of the Roman Senate (49 - 45 BC).
The former emerges victorious and becomes Roman dictator for life.
Julius Caesar, Roman dictator is assassinated by 23 members of a conspiracy against him.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/40s_BC   (241 words)

  
 Ancient Rome, republic, augustus, jews, christians, pax roman, cicero, government, laws, society
Roman Dictator An explanation of the office and a list of all the dictators in the republic.
Roman History A history of the Roman republics and the subsequent evolution of dictatorships.
Jews in the Roman Empire A brief description of the persecution of the Jews in Rome and the destruction of the temple.
www.crf-usa.org /cityyouth/rome.htm   (658 words)

  
 Roman Questions
A Roman dictator was a regular magistrate, nominated by another office-holder, usually a consul (who was authorized to do so by the senate) and he normally served for a six-month term--or less, if he was appointed e.g.
Consequently, Romans felt a mix of contempt and respect for other cultures--a fruitful mix in some sense, since the contempt encouraged their military ambitions while the respect motivated them to preserve what was best about e.g.
The Romans were careful not to let this get out of hand, and there never seems to have been a real problem with discipline or insubordination (auxiliary troops liked plunder too).
www.people.virginia.edu /~bgh2n/romanquestions.html   (3844 words)

  
 Mr. Dowling's Julius Caesar Page
Many Romans wanted a strong leader, and the ambitious Julius Caesar was an obvious choice.
In that time, dictators were temporary rulers elected in times of crisis, but Caesar was elected because of his popularity.
The last Roman dictator had been elected almost 150 years earlier, at the end of the second Punic War.
www.mrdowling.com /702-caesar.html   (501 words)

  
 BrianSanders   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Fabius’ first act as dictator was to admonish the Romans for not properly honoring the gods, which he believed to be the cause of their misfortunes.
“Romans called Marcellus their sword, and Fabius their buckler” (Posidonius as quoted in Plutarch Fabius.19) and Hannibal “dreaded Marcellus when he was in motion, and Fabius when he sat still”.
Earlier Romans had followed this strategy, what today might be called a policy of preemptive strikes, when dealing with the Latins, Etruscans, and other surrounding peoples to prevent them from some day becoming strong enough to pose a major threat.
web.ics.purdue.edu /~bpsander/frame_free/ff_fabius_v_scipio.htm   (3603 words)

  
 Istria on the Internet - History - Histri and Romans   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Roman Dictator chose a position not far from them at the junction of the Anio and the Tiber, and extended his lines as far as possible from the one river to the other.
The Dictator from the other side had attacked the second line of reserves, and whilst the enemy faced about to meet the sudden charges and confused shouts, he had thrown his victorious horse and foot across their front.
The Dictator had now reached the enemies' abandoned camp, and his soldiers were anxious to disperse in quest of booty, but when he saw the signal he reminded them that there was richer spoil in the city, and led them up to the gate.
www.istrianet.org /istria/history/histri-romans/livy04-eng.htm   (21234 words)

  
 roman dictator - Books, journals, articles @ The Questia Online Library
Roman Honor Roman Honor The Fire in the Bones Carlin A. Barton UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA...Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Barton, Carlin A. Roman honor: the fire in the bones/Carlin A. Barton.
vi 53, 10 the ceremonial of a Roman nobles funeral, and the exhibition of...
DICTATOR originally a Roman magistrate appointed to rule the state...the office in 44 b.c., Rome had 88 dictators.
www.questia.com /search/roman-dictator   (1727 words)

  
 Livy's History of Rome
He left Q. Sulpicius, lieutenant-general, in charge of the camp, and gave the command of the cavalry to M. Fabius, lieutenant-general, with orders not to move their troops before daylight, as it was difficult to handle them in the confusion of a night attack.
Besides taking every measure which any other general of prudence and energy would have taken under the circumstances, the Dictator gave a striking instance of his courage and generalship, which deserves especial praise, for, on ascertaining that the enemy had left his camp with the greater part of his force, he sent M.
When the Dictator saw the smoke - the agreed signal - he called out that the enemy's camp was taken, and ordered the news to be spread everywhere.
mcadams.posc.mu.edu /txt/ah/Livy/Livy04.html   (21151 words)

  
 Forum Romanum
Roman, let this be your care, your art: To beat down the proud, and teach the ways of peace.
A Dictator is Appointed, A Resolution to the Crisis
Re: A Dictator is Appointed, A Resolution to the Crisis
www.novaroma.org /forum/mainlist/1999/1999-07-04.html   (8134 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
It should be noted that the original Roman system of nomenclature is used (the tria nomina) with full names and filiation to the extent of grandchildren.
Roman Empire (31 B.C. Emperors 31 B.C. Consuls 30 B.C. Consuls A.D. Consuls A.D. Consuls A.D. Eastern Roman Empire (A.D. Emperors A.D. Consuls A.D. (of both Empires)
Western Roman Empire: Emperors A.D. Barbarian Kings of Italy A.D. Consuls A.D. (of both Empires)
www.ghg.net /shetler/rome/rulers   (116 words)

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