Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Romanian substratum words


Related Topics

  
  Romanians
The Romanian people, are a nation in the meaning ''an ethnos '' (in Romanian: ''popor),'' defined more by a sense of sharing a common Romanian culture and having a Romanian mother tongue, than by citizenship or by being subjects to any particular country.
Until the 19th century, it denoted the speakers of Romanian, and was a much more distinct concept than that of ''Romania, the country of the Romanians.'' The Moldavia ns and the Wallachia ns had already split off and shaped separate national identities.
Romanian Catholics are present in Transylvania, Bucharest, and parts of Moldavia, belonging to both the Eastern Rite (Romanian Catholic Church) and the Roman Rite (Roman Catholic Church).
www.seattleluxury.com /encyclopedia/entry/romanians   (2455 words)

  
  Eastern Romance substratum - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Older Romanian etymological dictionaries tended to assume a borrowing in many cases, usually from a Slavic language or from Hungarian, but etymological analysis may show that, in many cases, the sense of borrowing was from Romanian to the neighboring languages.
Many of the Romanian substratum words have Albanian cognates, and if these words are in fact Dacian, it indicates that the Dacian language may have been on the same branch as Albanian.
Another one is Bryndza, a type of cheese made in Eastern Austria, Poland, Slovakia and Ukraine, the word being derived from the Romanian word for cheese.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/List_of_Dacian_words   (690 words)

  
 Talk:Eastern Romance substratum - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Olteanu correctly identifies ţur- as a substratum Dacian stem that meant 'a tube, a tunnel', and he cites the ancient Greek word Syrinx (=Surinx, that 'Y' is always an Upsilon) as being from the same stem.
The stem is definitely an ancient Balkan stem, and the Romanian words are from Dacian and Thracian.
This is from a good-sized cluster of anc.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Talk:List_of_Dacian_words   (6042 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Romanian language
Romanian (limba română IPA /'limba ro'mɨnə/) is the fifth of the Romance languages in terms of number of speakers.
Romanian is also an official or administrative language in various communities and organisations (such as the Latin Union and the European Union - the last as of 2007).
Romanian is one of the five languages in which religious services are performed in the autonomous monastic state of Mount Athos, spoken in the sketae of Prodromos and Lacu (a sketa being a community of monks; sketae is plural).
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Romanian-language   (1231 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Eastern Romance substratum
Older Romanian etymological dictionaries tended to assume a borrowing in many cases, usually from a Slavic language or from Hungarian, but etymological analysis may show that, in many cases, the direction of borrowing was from Romanian to the neighboring languages.
Many of the Romanian substratum words have Albanian cognates, and if these words are in fact Dacian, it indicates that the Dacian language may have been on the same branch as Albanian.
Another one is Bryndza, a type of cheese made in Eastern Austria, Poland, Slovakia and Ukraine, the word being derived from the Romanian word for cheese.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Eastern_Romance_substratum   (679 words)

  
 Romanian_language LANGUAGE SCHOOL EXPLORER
All the dialects of Romanian are believed to have been unified in a Common Romanian language until sometime between the 7th and the 10th century when the area was influenced by the Byzantine Empire and Romanian became influenced by the Slavonic languages.
Romanian is a Romance language, belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European language family, having much in common with languages such as French, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish.
Romanian is one of the five languages in which religious services are performed in the autonomous monastic state of Mount Athos, spoken in the sketae of Prodromos and Lacu (a sketa being a community of monks; sketae is plural).
www.school-explorer.com /info/Romanian_language   (5163 words)

  
 Transylvania
Romanians claim that they are the descendants of Romanized Dacians, and base their present claim to Transylvania on this assertion.
Romanian is also similar to Albanian morphology and phonology and includes derivatives of Albanian words that denote body parts, kinship, plants and animals and, most significantly, shepherd words.
Romanian also lacks any words of Old German origin, which is significant because the presence of the Goths and the Gepidae in Transylvania.
www.geocities.com /transmagyar/Part_1_.htm   (2395 words)

  
 Middle East Open Encyclopedia: Romanian language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-24)
All the dialects of Romanian are believed to have been unified in a Common Romanian language until sometime between the 7th and the 10th century when the area was influenced by the Byzantine Empire and Romanian became influenced by the Slavonic languages.
Romanian is a Romance language, belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European language family, having much in common with languages such as French, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish.
Romanian is spoken mostly in Romania, Moldova, Ukraine, Hungary, Serbia and Montenegro, Bulgaria, but there are also Romanian language speakers in countries like Canada, United States, Germany, Israel, Australia and New Zealand, mainly due to post-World War II emigration.
www.baghdadmuseum.org /ref?title=Romanian_language   (4327 words)

  
 Romanian a MADE up language | Antimoon Forum   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-24)
Romanian developed in a region that was surrounded by slavic countries.
The Romanian church was preaching in bulgarian slavic during the 13th to 18th century, so naturally this had a huge effect on the languages lexicality but little on its syntax.
But this is fact, Romanian was a latin language from the moment it became the first romance language to the moment of the "national awakening" and there after.
www.antimoon.com /forum/t2101-300.htm   (1947 words)

  
 Articles - Romanians   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-24)
The Romanians (români in present-day Romanian and rumâni in historical contexts) are an ethnic group; they are the majority inhabitants of Romania and of Moldova (where they are also called Moldovans); each of these countries also have other significant ethnic minorities, and the Romanians constitute an ethnic minority in several nearby countries.
The Romanians (Romanian: românii), or the Romanian people, are a nation in the meaning an ethnos (in Romanian: popor), defined more by a sense of sharing a common Romanian culture and having a Romanian mother tongue, than by citizenship or by being subjects to any particular country.
Romanian Catholics are present in Transylvania, Bucharest, and parts of Moldavia, belonging to both the Eastern Rite (Romanian Catholic Church) and the Roman Rite (Roman Catholic Church).
www.couponsa.com /articles/Romanians   (2193 words)

  
 Thracian language: Encyclopedia topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-24)
There are also substratum words in the Romanian language that are cited as evidence of the genetic relationship of the Thracian language to ancient Greek and the ancient Macedonian (Macedonian: A native or inhabitant of Macedon) language (the extinct language of Macedon), and perhaps to other Centum language branches.
The most reliable Thracian words are the words which have been explicitly cited and described as Thracian by the ancient author (author: Writes (books or stories or articles or the like) professionally (for pay)) s.
Another source for the Thracian vocabulary is words of unknown or uncertain etymology found in Bulgarian (Bulgarian: A native or inhabitant of Bulgaria), Romanian (Romanian: A native or inhabitant of Romania), and Aromanian (Aromanian: aromanian...
www.absoluteastronomy.com /reference/thracian_language   (1255 words)

  
 Dacian language: Encyclopedia topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-24)
It is thought that these words entered from the Dacian language in ancient times, and are the remains of the Dacian language.
Whatever the case, contact between proto-Albanian and the Romanian substrate language was disrupted before the Roman conquest of the Dacians in 106 (106: more facts about this subject), as shown by phonetical correspondences that cannot be explained by later phonetical changes of either Romanian and Albanian.
Origin of Romanians (Origin of Romanians: the romanians (and vlachs) are a nation speaking romanian, a romance languagesromance...
www.absoluteastronomy.com /reference/dacian_language   (903 words)

  
 Culture of Romania - Psychology Central   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-24)
Some customs, names and a substratum of words in the Romanian language are considered Dacian influence, although some are also disputed, as is the theory of Daco-Romanian continuity which has at times played a significant role in Romanian national identity.
The first half of the 20th century is regarded by many as the golden age of Romanian culture and it is the period when it reached its main level of international affirmation and a strong connection to the European cultural trends.
Many Romanian rock bands of the 1970s and 1980s, such as Iris and Holograf, continue to be popular, particularly with the middle-aged, while since the 1990s there has been growth in the boy band and hip hop genres.
www.psychcentral.com /psypsych/Culture_of_Romania   (4977 words)

  
 Language contact - Psychology Wiki
Much is made about the contemporary borrowing of English words into other languages, but this phenomenon is not new, nor is it even very large by historical standards.
Albanian borrowed so many words from Iranian languages, for example, that it was at first considered a branch of the Indo-Iranian languages, and was not recognized as an independent branch of the Indo-European languages for many decades.
Romanian was influenced by the Slavic languages spoken by neighboring tribes in the centuries after the fall of the Roman Empire, not only in vocabulary but also in phonology and morphology.
psychology.wikia.com /wiki/Language_contact   (1043 words)

  
 [No title]
The large number of words pertaining to the shepherd way of life among the substratum words indicate that they were mainly shepherds, who also practised some relatively primitive agriculture.
The Romanian word for "village" itself - sat - is from Latin fossatum "area surrounded by moats or ditches"; likewise, when such villages formed a "popular Romania", it was known to the common people as tara " country", from the Latin term terra.
Summarizing the formation of the Romanian people and their language, one may say that the process proper began with the Romanization of the population north of the Danube in the second to fourth centuries; at the heart of it were the two main ethnic elements, Dacian and Roman.
www.hungarianhistory.com /lib/pas/pas05.htm   (2483 words)

  
 Folklore & Traditions   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-24)
However, the linguist Dr. Sorin Paliga challenges the notion that the Romanian word Zmeu is of Slavic origin, and hypothesizes that the pan-Slavic forms were an early Slavic loan from the Dacian language.
In Romanian mythology, Meşterul Manole (roughly: Manole the Craftsman) is the architect of the Curtea de Argeş Monastery in Wallachia.
In Romanian mythology, strigoi (same form singular or plural) are the evil souls of the dead rising from the tombs (or living) that transform into an animal or phantomatic apparition during the night to haunt the countryside, troubling whoever it encounters.
www.restromania.com /RomanianFolkloreAndTraditions.htm   (7157 words)

  
 Romanian 101 > Romanian Language > Influences
About 300 words found only in Romanian (in all dialects) or with a cognate in the Albanian language may be inherited from Dacian, many of them being related to pastoral life (for example: balaur=dragon; brânza=cheese; mal=shore; see: Eastern Romance substratum).
A different view is that these non-Latin words (many with Albanian cognates) are not necessarily Dacian, but rather were brought into the territory that is modern Romania by Romance-speaking shepherds migrating north from Albania, Serbia, and northern Greece who became the Romanian people.
It was estimated that about 38% of the number of words in Romanian are of French or Italian origin and adding this to the words that were inherited from Latin, it makes about 75-85% of the Romanian words that can be traced to Latin.
www.101languages.net /romanian/influences.html   (724 words)

  
 Romanian@languagesnet.EU- - Universitatea din Bucuresti
Romanian is a Neolatin language, descendant of the vulgar (popular) Latin.
The history of the Romanian language reveals a special relationship between conservationism, language loyalty and vitality, a high degree of flexibility in contact with diverse cultures and languages.
Romanian minorities are to be found in territories neighbouring Romania and in diaspora communities all over the world.
www.unibuc.ro /ro/romanianlanguagesnet.eu-   (10891 words)

  
 UCLA Language Materials Project Language Profiles Page
Words are made up through the use of the letters alone - in which case, their value is the default vowel /á/, or letters in combination with various symbols representing vowel sounds and tones.
As a result, loan words with final consonants or consonant clusters such as "fl" or "brake", for intance, are usually pronounced with an extra vowel inserted between the consonants.
The English word "Burma" or "Burmese" is /ba-ma/ in colloquial, and /myan-ma/ in literary Burmese, which are usually used with a suffix attached to it.
www.lmp.ucla.edu /Profile.aspx?LangID=72   (2051 words)

  
 A New Dimension of the Linguistical Relations between Romanian and Greek   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-24)
We know indeed such a word: phren, phrenos "mind", whose oldest meaning was in fact "diaphragm, the membrane which separates the thorax from the abdomenon", thus almost identical to that of the romanian word.
Such a word exists in old Greek indeed: spyrthízō means "(about animals, mainly horses) to run with jumps, or hitting their bellies with their legs" which explains also the semantic relation between rom.
There are many Romanian words supposed to come from south-Slavic, but whose direct bulgarian or serbian correspondents either do not fit the possible etymon, or they differ from their common Slavic pattern.
soltdm.tripod.com /limbimod/romana/grecrom.htm   (1874 words)

  
 Greek language
A large number of words and expressions have remained unchanged through the centuries, and have found their way into a number of other languages, including Latin, German, French, and English.
The word εστι "is" in Ancient Greek gains ν, and the accusative articles τον and την in Modern Greek lose it, depending on the start of the next word; this is called "movable nu".
In τον πατερα'' "the father" the first word is pronounced "tom", and in Modern Greek (but not Ancient Greek, which had an independent "b" sound) the second word is pronounced "batera" because "mp" is pronounced as "mb".
www.nebulasearch.com /encyclopedia/article/Greek_language.html   (1639 words)

  
 [No title]
Bronze Age civilization was established throughout the Romanian territories by the efforts and intelligence of the Dacian population, the branch of the great Thracian people north of the Danube.
In the practical absence of Dacian words with known senses, the investigation must be made with Thracian words, which are preserved mostly in Greek or Latin texts.
Words pertaining to shepherd terminology and the life in a mountainous territory of forests are the largest semantic group among these lexical elements, indicating the main occupation of the ancestors of the Rumanians (cf.
www.hungarian-history.hu /lib/pas/pas03.htm   (1737 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Dacian language
the substratum words found in the current Romanian language, the language that is spoken in almost all the places Dacians lived: there are about 400 words with uncertain origin (like brânză=cheese, balaur=dragon, etc), about 160 of which have cognates in Albanian.
The Dacian language may form the substratum of the Proto-Romanian language, which developed from the Vulgar Latin spoken in the Balkans north of the Jirecek line that roughly divides Latin influence from Greek influence.
Whether Dacian in fact forms the substratum of Proto-Romanian is disputed (see Origin of Romanians), yet this theory does not rely on the Romanization having occurred in Dacia, as Dacian was also spoken in Moesia, and as far south as northern Dardania.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Dacian_language   (844 words)

  
 Sample Entry: Language / Encyclopedia of Linguistics
Other features are of interest, particularly word and sentence structure; for example, Serbo-Croatian has begun to simplify its nouns--as has occurred more radically in Macedonian and Bulgarian--by reducing the number of grammatical endings ("cases"), especially in the plural.
Linguists have tended to concentrate on the structure of Macedonian and Bulgarian words and their relationship to syntax and meaning, as well as on the interaction of the languages with others in the Balkan linguistic convergence area (or Sprachbund).
For the period between the 10th and 12th centuries, the textual evidence of the Proto-Macedonian and Bulgarian is important for the earliest body of attestations of Slavic in general, known as the canonical period of Old Church Slavic.
strazny.com /encyclopedia/sample-language.html   (1627 words)

  
 Megleno-Romanian_language LANGUAGE SCHOOL EXPLORER
Megleno-Romanian (known as Vlăheşte by speakers and Moglenitic, Meglenitic or Megleno-Romanian by linguists) is a Romance language, similar to Aromanian, and Romanian spoken in the Moglená region of Greece, in a few villages in the Republic of Macedonia and also in a few villages in Romania.
Some linguists consider it to be an intermediary between Romanian and Aromanian, often being considered either a dialect of Romanian or Aromanian or an independent language.
There are a number of Byzantine and Modern Greek words, several dozens which are also found in Daco-Romanian (Romanian language) and Aromanian and about 80 words that were borrowed via Bulgarian and other languages of the Balkans.
www.school-explorer.com /info/Megleno-Romanian_language   (659 words)

  
 Language Kinship vs. Language Union: an article by Cyril Babaev
But if languages look like each other or sound like each other, or their lexicons have the majority of common roots, that does not always mean that they used to be one some time ago.
As for morphology, most of the Balkan tongues have their dative and genitive cases coincided in one, though this process was never under way in Slavic languages (Romanian may be the language which introduced this feature).
It is widely known that the lexicon of both groups includes plenty of common words, many of them were borrowed from Slavic into Baltic or vice versa.
indoeuro.bizland.com /archive/article20.html   (2481 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.