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Topic: Romanticism


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  Romanticism Art - Artists, Artworks and Biographies
In the visual arts, Romanticism came to signify the departure from classical forms and an emphasis on emotional and spiritual themes.
Caused by the sudden social changes that occurred during the French Revolution and the Napoleonic era, Romanticism was formed as a revolt against Neoclassicism and its emphasis on order, harmony, balance, idealization, and rationality.
Romanticism began in Germany and England in the 1770’s, and had spread throughout Europe by the 1820’s.
wwar.com /masters/movements/romanticism.html   (294 words)

  
  Romanticism
A movement of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries which marked the reaction in literature, philosophy, art, religion, and politics from the neo-classicism and formal orthodoxy of the preceding period.
Romanticism arose so gradually and exhibited so many phases that a satisfactory definition is not possible.
By way of caution it may be said that such descriptions of romanticism as this one probably overstress the distinction between romanticism and classicism or neo-classicism, and cannot hope to resolve that confusion over what "romantic" means which Professor A. Lovejoy asserts has "for a century been the scandal" of literary history and criticism.
www.gothicpress.freeserve.co.uk /Romanticism.htm   (773 words)

  
 Romanticism
These activities set the tone for one aspect of Romanticism: the belief that products of the uncultivated popular imagination could equal or even surpass those of the educated court poets and composers who had previously monopolized the attentions of scholars and connoisseurs.
Whereas during much of the 17th and 18th centuries learned allusions, complexity and grandiosity were prized, the new romantic taste favored simplicity and naturalness; and these were thought to flow most clearly and abundantly from the "spontaneous" outpourings of the untutored common people.
It is precisely people in urban environments aware of the stark contrast between their daily lives and the existence of the inhabitants of the wild who romanticise nature.
www.wsu.edu:8080 /~brians/hum_303/romanticism.html   (3260 words)

  
 Romanticism
Isaiah Berlin claims that, ‘the importance of romanticism is that it is the largest recent movement to transform the lives and the thought of the Western world’.
One of the problems with Romanticism is that it is readily reduced to the popular conception of romanticism, which dictionaries define as relating to being imaginative – in the sense of being fanciful, emotional and divorced from experience.
As Isaiah Berlin points out, ‘the literature on romanticism is larger than romanticism itself, and the literature defining what it is that the literature on romanticism is concerned with is quite large in its turn.’ Romanticism is perhaps best pictured as a tree with complex roots, many branches and varied fruit.
www.greenspirit.org.uk /Resources/Romanticism.htm   (729 words)

  
  Romanticism information - Search.com
Romanticism was a secular and intellectual movement in the history of ideas that originated in late 18th century Western Europe.
In France, Romanticism is associated with the 19th century, particularly in the paintings of Théodore Géricault and Eugène Delacroix, the plays and novels of Victor Hugo (such as Les Misérables and Ninety-Three), and the novels of Stendhal.
In Russia, the principal exponent of Romanticism is Alexander Pushkin.
www.search.com /reference/Romanticism   (2866 words)

  
  Romanticism - MSN Encarta
Romanticism cannot be identified with a single style, technique, or attitude, but romantic painting is generally characterized by a highly imaginative and subjective approach, emotional intensity, and a dreamlike or visionary quality.
Antoine Jean Gros began the transition from neoclassicism to romanticism by moving away from the sober style of his teacher, Jacques-Louis David, to a more colorful and emotional style, influenced by the Flemish Baroque painter Peter Paul Rubens, which he developed in a series of battle paintings glorifying Napoleon.
The main figure for French romanticism was Théodore Géricault, who carried further the dramatic, coloristic tendencies of Gros's style and who shifted the emphasis of battle paintings from heroism to suffering and endurance.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761573163/Romanticism_(art).html   (783 words)

  
  Romanticism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Romanticism was a secular and intellectual movement that originated in late 18th century Western Europe.
In France, Romanticism is associated with the 19th century, particularly in the paintings of Théodore Géricault and Eugène Delacroix, the plays and novels of Victor Hugo (such as Les Misérables and Ninety-Three), and the novels of Stendhal.
In Russia, the principal exponent of Romanticism is Alexander Pushkin.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Romanticism   (2691 words)

  
 romanticism - HighBeam Encyclopedia
The basic aims of romanticism were various: a return to nature and to belief in the goodness of humanity; the rediscovery of the artist as a supremely individual creator; the development of nationalistic pride; and the exaltation of the senses and emotions over reason and intellect.
Nineteenth-century romanticism was characterized by the avoidance of classical forms and rules, emphasis on the emotional and spiritual, representation of the unattainable ideal, nostalgia for the grace of past ages, and a predilection for exotic themes.
Although elements of romanticism are present in the music of Beethoven, Weber, and Schubert, it reached its zenith in the works of Berlioz, Mendelssohn, Schumann, Chopin, Liszt, and Wagner.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-romantic.html   (1504 words)

  
 [No title]
Romanticism was a broadly-based cultural and intellectual movement which spread throughout Europe in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.
Romanticism had so many facets and touched so many different areas of culture that it is not feasible to offer a uniform definition of this phenomenon.
Romanticism is a literary and artistic movement of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries that placed value on emotion or imagination over reason, on the imagination over society.
www.lycos.com /info/romanticism.html   (755 words)

  
 Romanticism Notes   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Romanticism was an artistic and intellectual movement that originated in the late 18th century and stressed strong emotion, imagination, freedom from classical correctness in art forms, and rebellion against social conventions.
Romanticism was an attitude or intellectual orientation that characterized many works of literature, painting, music, architecture, criticism, and historiography in Western civilization over a period from the late 18th to the mid-19th century.
Romanticism can be seen as a rejection of the precepts of order, calm, harmony, balance, idealization, and rationality that typified Classicism in general and late 18th century Neoclassicism in particular.
www.sullivan-county.com /nf0/nov_2000/romanticism.htm   (2012 words)

  
 IHAS: Artist/Movement/Ideas
The Age of Enlightenment, as the 18th century was named for its emphasis on reason and its optimistic faith in a perfectible material and spiritual universe, immolated itself in the flames of the revolutions which closed that century.
The birth of Romanticism is, as historian Paul Johnson has written, also the birth of the modern.
Romanticism, more than anything else, is the cult of the individual--the cultural and psychological nativity of the I--the Self--the inner spark of divinity that links one human being to another and all human beings to the Larger Truth.
www.pbs.org /wnet/ihas/icon/romanticism.html   (552 words)

  
 sociology - Romanticism
Romanticism the movement however, began having an impact on music well before this point in time, beginning with the introduction of elements of dance and song from outside of the court culture then dominant in the patronage of the arts.
Romanticism, by having a unique reverence for what was old as being separate from the present, had strains which both revelled in form, and which rebelled against strictures not seen as "essential".
In France, Romanticism is associated with the 19th century, particularly in the paintings of Théodore Géricault and Eugène Delacroix, the plays of Victor Hugo and the novels of Stendhal.
www.aboutsociology.com /sociology/Romanticism   (2656 words)

  
 Romanticism
Although Romanticism and Neoclassicism were philosophically opposed, they were the dominant European styles for generations, and many artists were affected to a lesser or greater degree by both.
Obvious successors of Romanticism include the Pre-Raphaelite movement and the Symbolist painters.
But Impressionism, and through it almost all of 20th century art, is also firmly rooted in the individualism of the Romantic tradition.
www.artcyclopedia.com /history/romanticism.html   (149 words)

  
 Romanticism by Roger Jones   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Philosophers and writers associated with the Romantic movement include Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832), Freidrich Wilhelm Joseph von Schelling (1775-1854), and George Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831) in Germany; Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) and William Wordsworth (1770-1850) in Britain.
Philosophically romanticism represents a shift from the objective to the subjective: Science claims to describe the objective world, the world understood from no particular viewpoint.
Imagine three people looking at a landscape, one is a farmer, another a property developer and the third an artist.
www.philosopher.org.uk /rom.htm   (2188 words)

  
 Romanticism Art Reproductions, Romanticism Paintings   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Romanticism was an artistic and intellectual movement in the history of ideas that originated in late 18th century Western Europe.
Romanticism is also noted for its elevation of the achievements of what it perceived as heroic individuals and artists.
Romanticism is often understood as a set of new cultural and aesthetic values.
www.topofart.com /movements/Romanticism   (912 words)

  
 Lecture 16: The Romantic Era
Romanticism was the new thought, the critical idea and the creative effort necessary to cope with the old ways of confronting experience.
Romanticism reveals the persistence of Enlightenment thought, the Romantic’s definition of themselves and a gradual awareness of a new enemy.
Romanticism may then be considered as a critique of the inadequacies of what it held to be Enlightened thought.
www.historyguide.org /intellect/lecture16a.html   (3968 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Romanticism therefore values the particular insight, the visionary glimpse into imaginative union with the universe, the emotional certainty and joy that arises from a feeling of intimate association in a envisioned patterned order.
And it is clearly true, that as Romanticism developed, the interest in traditional spirituality and the ritualistic and mystical forms of worship (especially those connected with the Middle Ages) associated with it, grew.
In this view, the development of Romanticism is closely linked to the fact that the growing population of Europe, the reforms in land ownership, and the growing industrialization were producing a huge population of dispossessed people, those with no particular communal roots, who had no traditional sense of social order to fall back upon.
www.mala.bc.ca /~mcneil/lec/lecromanticism.txt   (8286 words)

  
 Definitions of romanticism
Romanticism: a movement of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries that marked the reaction in literature, philosophy, art, religion, and politics from the neoclassicism and formal orthodoxy of the preceding period.
Although romanticism tends at times to regard nature as alien, it more often sees in nature a revelation of Truth, the "living garment of God," and a more suitable subject for art than those aspects of the world sullied by artifice.
Romanticism seeks to find the Absolute, the Ideal, by transcending the actual, whereas realism finds its values in the actual and naturalism in the scientific laws the undergird the actual.
www.vcu.edu /engweb/eng372/intro-h4.htm   (686 words)

  
 Romanticism   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Romanticism, according to Ayn Rand, is a category of art based on the recognition of the principle that man possesses the faculty of volition.
Romanticism (literature), a movement in the literature of virtually every country of Europe, the United States, and Latin America that lasted from about 1750 to about 1870, characterized by reliance on the imagination and subjectivity of approach, freedom of thought and expression, and an idealization of nature.
An increasing demand for spontaneity and lyricism—qualities that the adherents of romanticism found in folk poetry and in medieval romance—led to a rejection of regular meters, strict forms, and other conventions of the classical tradition.
www.tracingboard.com /romanticism.htm   (1737 words)

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