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Topic: Rosenhan experiment


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In the News (Thu 25 Apr 19)

  
  Rosenhan
Rosenhan claims that the study demonstrates that psychiatrists cannot reliably tell the difference between people who are sane and those who are insane.
Rosenhan explains that psychiatric labels tend to stick in a way that medical labels do not and that everything a patient does is interpreted in accordance with the diagnostic label once it has been applied.
Rosenhan noted that experience of hospitalisation for the pseudo patients was one of depersonalisation and powerlessness.
www.holah.karoo.net /rosenhan.htm   (1073 words)

  
  Rosenhan experiment « Peoples Health and Fitness
The Rosenhan experiment was a famous experiment into the validity of psychiatric diagnosis conducted by David Rosenhan in 1972.
For this experiment, Rosenhan used a well-known research and teaching hospital, whose staff had heard of the results of the initial study but claimed that similar errors could not be made at their institution.
Rosenhan arranged with them that during a three month period, one or more pseudopatients would attempt to gain admission and the staff would rate every incoming patient as to the likelihood they were an impostor.
resistancetraining.wordpress.com /2007/04/20/rosenhan-experiment   (1605 words)

  
  Rosenhan experiment Information
The Rosenhan experiment was a famous experiment into the validity of psychiatric diagnosis conducted by David Rosenhan in 1972.
For this experiment, Rosenhan used a well-known research and teaching hospital, whose staff had heard of the results of the initial study but claimed that similar errors could not be made at their institution.
Rosenhan arranged with them that during a three month period, one or more pseudopatients would attempt to gain admission and the staff would rate every incoming patient as to the likelihood they were an impostor.
www.bookrags.com /wiki/Rosenhan_experiment   (1025 words)

  
  Rosenhan experiment
For this experiment, Rosenhan used a well-known research and teaching hospital, whose staff had heard of the results of the initial study but claimed that similar errors could not be made at their institution.
Rosenhan arranged with them that during a three month period, one or more pseudopatients would attempt to gain admission and the staff would rate every incoming patient as to the likelihood they were an impostor.
Rosenhan published his findings in Science, criticising the validity of psychiatric diagnosis and the disempowering and demeaning nature of patient care experienced by the associates in the study.
www.mrsci.com /Psychiatry/Rosenhan_experiment.php   (720 words)

  
  Rosenhan experiment
The Rosenhan experiment was an investigation into the validity of psychiatric diagnosis conducted by David Rosenhan in 1972.
For this experiment, Rosenhan used a well-known research and teaching hospital, whose staff had heard of the results of the initial study, but claimed that similar errors could not be made at their institution.
Rosenhan claimed that during a three month period one or more pseudopatients would attempt to gain admission and the staff were required to detect which patients were impostors.
pedia.newsfilter.co.uk /wikipedia/r/ro/rosenhan_experiment.html   (697 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: David Rosenhan
Rosenhan claims that the study demonstrates that psychiatrists cannot reliably tell the difference between people who are sane and those who are insane.
Rosenhan explains that psychiatric labels tend to stick in a way that medical labels do not and that everything a patient does is interpreted in accordance with the diagnostic label once it has been applied.
Rosenhan noted that experience of hospitalisation for the pseudo patients was one of depersonalisation and powerlessness.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/David-Rosenhan   (281 words)

  
 The Rosenhan Labelling Experiment - 1973: Oral Presentation notes. - CheatHouse.com
Rosenhan was one of the first psychologists to specifically design an experiment to investigate people’s perceptions of sanity and insanity.
The aim of this experiment was to determine if psychiatric diagnosis is in the mind of observers and is more related to the environment in which the person is situated, rather than the person’s behaviour.
Rosenhan had sent no pseudo patients into the hospital and the people the staff suspected to be fake were in fact genuine patients.
www.cheathouse.com /essay/essay_view.php?p_essay_id=100302   (367 words)

  
 Psychology Experiments - Rosenhan, Milgram, Zimbardo Prison
The study went swimmingly well - within just two days of the experiment four of the 'prisoners' were released owing to severe emotional reactions - rage, depression, crying and severe anxiety - and a fifth was released after he manifested a severe "psychosomatic rash".
Rosenhan's study understandably upset a great number of mental health professionals who suggested that they themselves view their patients objectively and took offense at the implication that mental health professionals perceive their patients according to the needs and norms of the institution.
"The experiment must continue" the researcher told the nervous subject, who did as he was told and delivered what he thought was a severe or potentially fatal electric shock to the other 'subject'.
www.23nlpeople.com /NLP/psychology-experiments-milgram-zimbardo-rosenhan.html   (1689 words)

  
 Rosenhan experiment . Enpsychlopedia
Rosenhan believes that his pseudopatients are "sane" because 1) they did not, in fact, hear any strange voices and 2) they claimed they did only as part of an "experiment." But from another and wider angle, the pseudopatients can be judged to be, if not insane, then at least very curious people.
But Dr. Rosenhan and his co-conspirators have legitimized the act -- have "sanified" it, if you will -- by calling it "an experiment." To them, an experiment is a semantic environment of unimpeachable legitimacy -- which is to say, experimenters do not need to explain their behaviour.
But it is just as reasonable to suppose that Dr. Rosenhan and his pseudopatients are strange and unreliable people themselves, and that the doctors in the mental hospitals were entirely competent and judicious.
enpsychlopedia.org /psypsych/Rosenhan_experiment   (1394 words)

  
 Newman Study Site Rosenhan
Rosenhan and seven associates had themselves committed to different mental hospitals by complaining that they were hearing voices (a symptom commonly believed to be characteristic of schizophrenia).
Rosenhan didn't conclude that the staffs at these hospitals were incompetent or dishonest.
Rather, Rosenhan reasoned, the labels were so powerful that they profoundly affected the way information was processed and perceived.
www.pineforge.com /newman4study/resources/rosenhan1.htm   (651 words)

  
 Omnipelagos.com ~ article "Rosenhan experiment"
The Rosenhan experiment was a famous experiment into the validity of psychiatric diagnosis conducted by David Rosenhan in 1972.
Rosenhan believes that his pseudopatients are "sane" because 1) they did not, in fact, hear any strange voices and 2) they claimed they did only as part of an "experiment." But from another and wider angle, the pseudopatients can be judged to be, if not insane, then at least very curious people.
But Dr. Rosenhan and his co-conspirators have legitimized the act -- have "sanified" it, if you will -- by calling it "an experiment." To them, an experiment is a semantic environment of unimpeachable legitimacy -- which is to say, experimenters do not need to explain their behaviour.
www.omnipelagos.com /entry?n=rosenhan_experiment   (1379 words)

  
 Alternative News Network, Cairns, tropical north Queensland, Australia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
We do know that each pseudopatient, Rosenhan included, said that the voice was of the same sex as he or she, that it had been bothering the pseudopatient to some extent, that he or she had come to the unit on the advice of friends who had heard that "this was a good hospital".
Rosenhan and his confederates were given some therapy, and when they told of the joys, satisfactions and disappointments of an ordinary life - remember, they were making nothing up save the original complaint - all found that their pasts were reconfigured to fit the diagnosis: "This white 39-year-old male...
Rosenhan followed all orders while in hospital, asked for privileges, helped other patients to deal with their problems, offered legal advice, probably played his fair share of ping pong, and took copious notes, which the staff labelled as "writing behaviour" and saw as part of his paranoid schizophrenic diagnosis.
altnews.com.au /nuke/article.php?sid=6419&mode=thread&order=0   (5164 words)

  
 Rosenhan experiment - InformationBlast
The Rosenhan experiment was an investigation into the validity of psychiatry.
It was conducted by David Rosenhan in 1972.
Lauren Slater claimed in 2004 to have repeated Rosenhan's study by presenting at the emergency rooms of multiple hospitals with a single auditory hallucination.
www.informationblast.com /Rosenhan_experiment.html   (354 words)

  
 Can a psychiatrist tell what's wrong? - By Michael Brus - Slate Magazine
Recently, a new study tried to repeat the experiment and failed, supposedly proving that shrinks aren't as clueless today as they were a generation ago.
Rosenhan titled his study "On Being Sane in Insane Places" and argued that psychiatric diagnosis has more to do with the presumptions of clinicians, and their tendency to treat ordinary behavior as pathological when it occurs on a psych ward, than with a rational assessment of symptoms.
The Rosenhan study, which is still mentioned in undergraduate textbooks, continues to be an albatross for psychiatry.
www.slate.com /id/2144123   (1984 words)

  
 How free is free will? - Salon
In 1972, Rosenhan, a psychologist, wanted to see whether psychiatrists were, as they claimed to be, objective investigators of mental disorder, or whether they were closer to subjective guessers.
Rosenhan's experiment rocked the world of psychiatry, deeply shaking the belief, cherished among many in the profession, that psychiatry is well grounded in science.
Slater tells him that Rosenhan is suffering from a disease that can't be diagnosed, and that he's paralyzed.
dir.salon.com /story/books/review/2004/05/21/slater/index3.html?pn=3   (777 words)

  
 Boxing for Science
Rosenhan’s experiment consisted of explicit entrapment (essentially a “quality control” study), much like the police using minors in sting operations to procure tobacco or alcohol and female police officers posing as prostitutes to solicit offers of money for sex.
The experiment to test the competency of mental health facilities was judged worthy by its financial backers and participants, though as ‘hard’ science yields precise results, ‘soft’ science most often produces data which necessitates interpretation by assumption and requires a well argued presentation.
In much the same way as Rosenhan’s experiment begs the question of inherent systemic ineptitude versus common error in psychiatric diagnosis, so too it should be asked if Spitzer used “pseudoscience” in error when an expression such as quasi-science may have been a better choice.
www.flavinscorner.com /scibadly4.htm   (1452 words)

  
 Rosenhan experiment Psychiatry
The Rosenhan experiment was an investigation into the validity of psychiatricdiagnosisconducted by David Rosenhanin 1972.
Rosenhan published his findings in Science, criticising the validity of psychiatric diagnosis and the disempoweringand demeaning nature of patient care experienced by the associates in the study.
She claimed that she was not admitted to any of the hospitals but was given prescriptions for antipsychoticsand antidepressants.
www.lumrix.com /medical/psychiatry/rosenhan_experiment.html   (742 words)

  
 Science Experiment   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Quatermass Experiment - The Quatermass Experiment is a British television science-fiction serial, transmitted by BBC Television in the summer of 1953, and re-staged by BBC Four in 2005.
Rosenhan experiment - The Rosenhan experiment was an investigation into the validity of psychiatric diagnosis conducted by David Rosenhan in 1972.
Science Experiment - Science Experiment The Quatermass Experiment - The Quatermass Experiment is a British television science-fiction serial, transmitted by BBC Television in the summer of 1953, and re-staged by BBC Four in 2005.
sc26.mcgreevey97.com /scienceexperiment.html   (1265 words)

  
 SOCIAL STRUCTURE, Russ Long's Lecture Notes
Rosenhan notes that often there is only a loose association between the person labeled mentally ill and the actual act.
Rosenhan notes that in all likelihood some of the professional staff also realized that Rosenhan's students were not really "sick," but said nothing in order to save face.
In the second part of the experiment Rosenhan informed the hospitals that they could expect one or more pseudo patient to enter their hospital.
www.delmar.edu /socsci/rlong/intro/roles.htm   (1881 words)

  
 Alkaline Earth | Rosenhan experiment
The Rosenbaum experiment led Robert Spitzer to introduce more quantifiable diagnostic system, theoretically to avoid such disasters recurring.
I learned about this craziness from episode 1 of the BBC documentary called "The Trap.", by the same fellow who did The Power of Nightmares.
i miss my old physics classes where we could have gedanken experiments with "perfect" planes and spheres.
alkalineearth.com /link.ae/3334   (776 words)

  
 History News Network
Rosenhan's paper describing his findings, On Being Sane In Insane Places, was published in Science, where it burst like a bomb on the world of psychiatry.
Rosenhan uses that as proof of how ridiculous psychiatrists are because there had never been any reports before of 'thud' as an auditory hallucination.
Rosenhan's experiment, like, perhaps, any piece of good art, is prismatic, powerful and flawed.
hnn.us /blogs/entries/3280.html   (1632 words)

  
 APS Observer - Opening Skinner's Box Causes Controversy
The controversy dates back to Rosenhan's paper, "On Being Sane in Insane Places," which appeared in Science, about eight pseudo-patients who gained admission into mental hospitals by pretending to hear voices saying "empty," "hollow," or "thud." With one exception, the pseudo-patients were diagnosed with schizophrenia, despite behaving regularly in every other way.
Rosenhan, who was among the pseudo-patients, concluded that psychiatric diagnoses might exist as much in the minds of the observer as in the behavior of the observed.
In Slater's book — which looks at great psychological studies from the 20th century — she reports that Spitzer told her that Rosenhan's experiment could never be recreated, given the improved guidelines of the DSM-III.
www.psychologicalscience.org /observer/getArticle.cfm?id=1947   (1503 words)

  
 Rosenhan experiment - Psychology Wiki - a Wikia wiki   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Rosenhan experiment - Psychology Wiki - a Wikia wiki
Rosenhan published his findings in Science, criticising the validity of psychiatric diagnosis and the disempowering and demeaning nature of patient care experienced by the associates in the study.
In this vein psychiatrist Robert Spitzer claimed in a 1975 criticism of Rosenhan's study:
psychology.wikia.com /wiki/Rosenhan_experiment   (872 words)

  
 Powell's Books - Review-a-Day - Opening Skinner's Box: Great Psychological Experiments of the Twentieth Century by ...
Opening Skinner's Box, in which Slater guides us through 10 landmark psychological experiments, brims with moments like this one — unbelievable little scenes in which Slater or one of the many people she encounters does or says something so unexpected that you'll wonder, for just a split second, whether you're reading fiction.
Slater does reproduce Rosenhan's experiments, and manages to show that even today psychiatrists are something of a guessing crowd.
Take, for example, the work of John Darley and Bibb Latané, psychologists who devised a series of experiments to test why it is that people sometimes ignore other people's calls for help, and why, at other times, we will leap to others' comfort.
www.powells.com /review/2004_05_28.html   (2358 words)

  
 Greenhead College: Beacon Site Archive :   (Site not responding. Last check: )
*           Rosenhan notes that there is an enormous overlap in the behavap in the behaves terminology reflects the sickness model of abnormalityheir sanity (35 out of 118 patients voiced their suspicions).
The DV was the psychiatrists admission of the pseudopatient on the strength of a particular diagnostic label.
Some argue that Rosenhan's findings woudl not be replicated today since versions of DSM II have addressed themselves to the whole problem of unreliability, especially unclear criteria.
www.greenhead.ac.uk /beacon_archive/psychology/resources/Rosenhan.htm   (2715 words)

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