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Topic: Royal Flying Corps


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In the News (Sun 17 Feb 19)

  
  Stinson, Junkers, Royal Flying Corps, Winnipeg Falcons Pictures
Flying Club, now sadly closed due to lack of income.
Royal Flying Corps Diaries in Egypt January to March 1918
Royal Flying Corps Diaries in Egypt April to December 1918
www.kw.igs.net /~brianj   (422 words)

  
  Royal Flying Corps - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Royal Flying Corps (RFC) was the over-land air arm of the British military during most of World War I.
The Royal Navy however was not keen on having naval aviation under the control of an Army corps and formed its own Royal Naval Air Service.
Eleven RFC members received the Victoria Cross during World War I. Before the Battle of the Somme (1916) the RFC had 421 aircraft, with four kite-balloon squadrons and fourteen balloons.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Royal_Flying_Corps   (1476 words)

  
 The Royal Air Force - History Section   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
The standard of flying improved still more after the introduction of the Gosport tube which enabled the instructor to talk with his pupil, a capability which had previously been restricted to the few moments of quiet before and during a stall.
In 1918 the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Naval Air Service were amalgamated to form the Royal Air Force and as part of the reorganisation CFS became the Flying Instructors School.
Flying took place on the Tiger Moth, Harvard, Mosquito, Lancaster, Spitfire and one hour on the Vampire was included on the course to give some jet experience.
www.raf.mod.uk /history/cfshistory.html   (2046 words)

  
 ROYAL FLYING CORPS FACTS AND INFORMATION   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
The Royal Flying Corps (RFC) was the over-land air arm of the British military during most of World_War_I.
Formed by Royal Warrant on May_13, 1912, the RFC superseded the Air Battalion of the Royal_Engineers.
The RFC was responsible for manning observation balloons on the Western_front.
velocipay.com /Royal_Flying_Corps   (1345 words)

  
 Royal Flying Corps   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
The Royal Navy however was not keen on having aviation under the control of an Army corps and formed its own Royal Naval Air Service.
The RFC's first casualties of World War were before the Corps even arrived in Lt Robert R. Skene and Air Mechanic Barlow were killed on August 12 1914 when their probably overloaded plane crashed the way to rendezvous with the rest the RFC near Dover.
Eleven RFC members received the Victoria Cross during World War I. Before the Battle of the Somme (1916) the RFC had 421 aircraft with kite-balloon squadrons and fourteen balloons.
www.freeglossary.com /Royal_Flying_Corps   (989 words)

  
 James McCudden - Five Years in the Royal Flying Corps   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
In the pre-war RFC, he encountered a bewildering (at least to the modern reader) variety of aircraft: the B.E.2a, a 50 Gnome hp Avro, a 50 hp Bleriot, an Henri Farman, the B.E.4a "Bloater," and 80 hp Bleriots.
McCudden was no braggart, and the low-key, English gentleman's writing style of Flying Fury make it easy to overlook the fact that this book was written by a 23 year-old who had shot down 56 of his opponents and survived five years, in an environment where survival was measured in weeks or months.
His flying was wonderful, his courage magnificent, and in my opinion he is the bravest German airman whom it has been my privilege to see fight.
www.acepilots.com /wwi/br_mccudden.html   (2422 words)

  
 Royal Flying Corps -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
The Royal Flying Corps (RFC) was the over-land air arm of the British military during most of (A war between the allies (Russia, France, British Empire, Italy, United States, Japan, Rumania, Serbia, Belgium, Greece, Portugal, Montenegro) and the central powers (Germany, Austria-Hungary, Turkey, Bulgaria) from 1914 to 1918) World War I.
Early in the war RFC aircraft were marked with (National flag of the United Kingdom) Union Jacks on the wings.
Eleven RFC members received the (A British military decoration for gallantry) Victoria Cross during World War I. Before the (Click link for more info and facts about Battle of the Somme (1916)) Battle of the Somme (1916) the RFC had 421 aircraft, with four kite-balloon squadrons and fourteen balloons.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/R/Ro/Royal_Flying_Corps.htm   (1931 words)

  
 The Royal Flying Corps 1914-1918
The RFC was formed in April 1912 as the military (army and navy) began to recognise the potential for aircraft as observation platforms.
It was in this role that the RFC went to war in 1914 to undertake reconnaissance and artillery observation.
The RFC had experimented before the war with the arming of aircraft but the means of doing so remained awkward - because of the need to avoid the propellor arc and other obstructions such as wings and struts.
www.airwar1.org.uk   (973 words)

  
 Flying Fury: 5 Years in the Royal Flying Corps (Greenhill Military Paperbacks): Current Amazon U.S.A. One-Edition Data   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
He witnessed, indeed participated, in the trials and tribulations of the nascent Flying Corps and, as war arrived, saw the fragile craft used in experiments with armed combat against troops on the ground and against enmey flying machines.
His interest in flying led to passenger rides in a variety of aircraft and eventually to his performing aerial observer and gunner roles in combat where he was decorated.
His description of his five years in the Royal Flying Corps was written while the war was still ongoing and literally days before his posting as a squadron commander and tragic death in a flying accident en route to his new squadron.
www.mysqlwebhosting.biz /stuff-1853674060.html   (1034 words)

  
 First World War.com - Feature Articles - The Australian Flying Corps
The first role the Australian Flying Corps was to play in the Great War as part of the Australian Military Forces was in the invasion of German New Guinea on September 11th of 1914 by the Australian and Naval Military Expeditionary Forces.
The fourth squadron was raised in Australia as 4 Sqn Australian Flying Corps and arrived in England in March of 1917.
In June 4 Squadron Australian Flying Corps joined with 2 Squadron AFC as part of 80 Wing and together the paired squadrons began flying as a group ranging from 20 000 feet with the SE5a's to ground level where the Sopwith Camel had greeter efficiency.
www.firstworldwar.com /features/afc.htm   (4017 words)

  
 Museum of Army Flying   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
A large section of the Museum is dedicated to the inception of Army aviation, and the RFC.
Photographs, documents, flying clothing and aircraft used by early army pilots tell the fascinating story of early flying from 1912.
The RFC was also responsible for manning the observation balloons on the Western Front (1914-18).
www.flying-museum.org.uk /royalflyingcorps.html   (86 words)

  
 Royal Flying Corps
The Royal Flying Corps was formed 13 April 1912 to fulfill a perceived need, common before WORLD WAR I in European countries, to participate in the expanding field of AVIATION.
It comprised a military wing, a naval wing (later the ROYAL NAVAL AIR SERVICE) and a flying school; duties included reconnaissance, bombing, observation for the artillery, co-operation with the infantry in attacking enemy positions, supply drops and observation for the Royal Navy.
The RFC joined with the RNAS to become the Royal Air Force on 1 April 1918.
thecanadianencyclopedia.com /index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0006984   (151 words)

  
 BYRD AVIATION BOOKS AEROPLANE BOOKS - WW I AIRCRAFT BOOKS & WW 1 AIRPLANE BOOKS
Sykes, Claud (Vigilant), Cerebrus, 2005, new, soft cover, see photo, reprint of this 1934 classic account of the life of this legendary World War I flyer: the man he was, the life he led, the kills he made, and the strange controversial fate he met, victory log, photos, 192 pgs.
ROYAL FLYING CORPS COMMUNIQUES,1917-1918, Boyer, Chaz (editor), Grub St., 1998, new, see photo, Jan,.'17 to Mar, '18, fills in the gap left by two previously published volumes, 258 pgs.
ROYAL FLYING CORPS IN FRANCE, FROM MONS TO THE SOMME, Barker, Ralph, Constable, 1994, as new, see photo, covers the scout pilots & observer's role in the battles, photos, 237 pgs.
www.byrdaviationbooks.com /ww1_pg11.htm   (1068 words)

  
 16 Wing - Heritage - Royal Flying Corps
The training for RFC Canada started in April and continued through the summer as thousands of flying hours were recorded on board the American-built "Jenny", the Curtiss J.N.4, and soon after on its Canadian version, the J.N.4 (Can), dubbed the "Canuck" by the Americans.
Of course, not all flying lessons went smoothly and by the end of September, thirty-two planes had been destroyed at Camp Borden alone, seventy-one in all of RFC Canada.
Flying instruction was only one aspect of the training that was being delivered at Camp Borden.
www.airforce.dnd.ca /16wing/heritage/hist1_e.asp   (435 words)

  
 Royal Flying Corps   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
Formed by Royal Warrant on May 13, 1912, the RFC superseded the Air Branch of the Royal Engineers[?].
During winter 1917-18, RFC instructors trained with the Signal Corps of the US Army on three airfields accomodating about six thousand men, at Camp Taliaferro near Fort Worth, Texas.
Towards the end of World War I, on April 1, 1918, the RFC and the RNAS were amalgamated into the Royal Air Force under the control of the Air Ministry.
www.city-search.org /ro/royal-flying-corps.html   (627 words)

  
 Royal Flying Corps
It is embroidered with the letters RFC and a set of pilot's wings, in white.
The design of the flag was based on the brassards (armbands) worn by RFC staff officers.
But if the date of the pennant shown is correct, then the date for the introduction of the colours must be at least two years earlier.
www.fotw.net /flags/gb-rfc.html   (437 words)

  
 The Royal Air Force - History   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
This Time Line traces the history of aviation and the Royal Air Force from 1780 to 1918, documenting the major events in the development of flight and the service during this period.
Unfortunately, the "Mayfly", as she was also known, was destined never to fly as a gust of wind broke her back four months later.
It continued, "The day may not be far off when aerial operations with their devastation of enemy lands and destruction of industrial and populous centres on a vast scale may become the principal operations of war, to which the older forms of military and naval operations may become secondary and subordinate".
www.raf.mod.uk /history/line1780.html   (1426 words)

  
 Bancourt Communal Cemetery, Pas-de-Calais   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
It was lost a year later during the German offensive in the spring of 1918 but recaptured by the New Zealand Division (in particular, the 2nd Auckland Battalion) on 30 August 1918.
Bancourt Communal Cemetery contains the graves of six officers of the Royal Flying Corps (one of them unidentified) buried by the Germans in the autumn of 1916, and one soldier from New Zealand who died in September 1918.
Royal Flying Corps and 1st Reserve Cavalry Regiment Died 22nd September 1916.
www.silentcities.co.uk /cemeteryb/Bancourt%20Communal%20Cemetery,%20Pas-de-Calais.htm   (215 words)

  
 RFC; The Royal Flying Corps
The Royal Flying Corps was formed on 13th May 1912 and served through the majority of the First World War.
On 1st April 1918, the RFC and the RNAS (Royal Navy Air Service) were separated from the army and the navy and merged to form a new service, the Royal Air Force.
Uniforms of the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Air Force from 1912 onwards.
www.diggerhistory.info /pages-conflicts-periods/ww1/afc/rfc.htm   (166 words)

  
 Royal Flying Corps   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
According to a narrative from The War Museum Canada, "Lieutenant-Colonel (later Brigadier) C.G. Hoare, the RFC officer who headed the new training organization in Canada, moved quickly when he arrived from Britain in January 1917.
He ordered that flying instruction commence at Long Branch on 28 February 1917, although buildings were still under construction and the first JN-4s had been completed and approved for service only days before.
The largest school, Camp Borden, began flying training on 30 March 1917." This would date this recruiting poster to 1917.
www.aeroconservancy.com /rfcposter.htm   (88 words)

  
 Royal Flying Corps - netlexikon
Zum RFC gehörte eine Armee-, eine Marine- und eine Reserveeinheit, eine zentrale Flugschule in Upavon, Wiltshire, und die königlichen Flugzeugwerke in Farnborough.
August 1915 übernahm, kam das RFC zu mehr und mehr Kampferfolgen und steigenden Einsatzzahlen.
Kurz darauf überquerte das RFC mit 60 Flugzeugen der Schwadronen 2, 3, 4 und 5 den Ärmelkanal.
www.lexikon-definition.de /Royal-Flying-Corps.html   (996 words)

  
 The Royal Flying Corps   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
Transferred from sergeant in the Coldstream Guards to Air Mechanic, second class in 70 Squadron of the Royal Flying Corps.
Most of the pictures were probably taken at the RFC base at Fienvillers in northern France between June 1917 and April 1918, although after the Armistice, 70 squadron moved to Cologne, where some of the pictures were taken.
It was the first RFC unit to operate the Sopwith 1½ Strutter.
home.freeuk.net /rjgreen/rfc   (872 words)

  
 WW1 ROYAL FLYING CORPS     MONTHLY SAFETY REPORT  December 1917   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
By an error of judgement, he was attempting to fly at mid-day instead of at the recommended best lift periods, which are just after dawn and just before sunset.
The pilot of this flying machine attempted to maintain his altitude in a turn at 2,500 feet.
Remarks: This pilot was flying in full-dress uniform because he was the Officer of the Day.
www.gapan.org /news/rfc.htm   (1024 words)

  
 Accessory Mascots, Miscellaneous. Royal Flying Corps - 1912.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
On the 13 April 1912 the war office set up the Royal Flying Corps, RFC, which was designated to fly aircraft for the army and on 1st July 1914 the Royal Naval Air Service, RNAS was set up to do the same for the navy.
It was realized, after a short period, both services could not properly equip and used effectively the airpower they had been given.
This led on 1st April 1918 to the amalgamation of these two services, RFC and RNAS, to form the Royal Air Force, RAF and also the Women's auxiliary Royal Air force.
www.mascot-mania.co.uk /zerfc.html   (98 words)

  
 The Royal Flying Corps in Colour Photos - New book   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
This new title will include over one hundred genuine colour photographs of the men and machines of the Royal Flying Corps, in action on the Western Front in early 1918.
A previously unknown collection of glass plate images was recently discovered, during the cataloging of the British archives of the photographic company Eastman Kodak.
The War Department was disappointed with the results of the trial and abandoned its support, leaving the development of colour photography to languish for another decade.
www.aeroflight.co.uk /misc/rfcbook.htm   (398 words)

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