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Topic: Royal Proclamation of 1763


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In the News (Thu 21 Aug 14)

  
  Royal Proclamation of 1763 - MSN Encarta
The Royal Proclamation of 1763 was issued by King George III to establish a basis of government administration in the N American territories formally ceded by France to Britain...
Royal Proclamation of 1763, British proclamation that established boundaries and governments for the American colonies that Britain acquired from France and Spain after the French and Indian War (1754-1763).
The proclamation required settlers to withdraw from the newly established Indian territory and barred traders from entering the region unless they first obtained a license from the governor of one of the colonies.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_461511114/Royal_Proclamation_of_1763.html   (967 words)

  
 Royal Proclamation of 1763
The Royal Proclamation of 1763 was issued by King George III to establish a basis of government administration in the N American territories formally ceded by France to Britain in the Treaty of PARIS, 1763, following the SEVEN YEARS' WAR.
The Royal Proclamation thereby established the British Crown as the essential central agent in the transfer of Indian lands to colonial settlers.
Although these regions had been specifically designated in 1763 as outside the jurisdictional framework put in place by the Royal Proclamation, Canadian government officials recognized that the native peoples of the newly annexed territory had the same rights to their unceded ancestral lands as Indians in the UC area prior to the negotiation of treaties.
www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com /index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0006990   (1110 words)

  
 Canada in the Making - Aboriginals: Treaties & Relations
In 1763, the Royal Proclamation was created to integrate New France into the British Empire in North American.
The Royal Proclamation hints at the reason: it notes that British interests were, prior to 1763, responsible for "great fraud and abuses" in obtaining land from Aboriginals that had caused the latter "great dissatisfaction".
This act was an extension of the Royal Proclamation meant to push Québec's boundaries into Aboriginal land located past the Great Lakes into the Ohio and Mississippi River valleys.
www.canadiana.org /citm/themes/aboriginals/aboriginals3_e.html   (748 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Proclamation
In English law, a proclamation is a formal announcement ("Royal Proclamation"), made under the great seal, of some matter which the King in Council or Queen in Council desires to make known to his subjects: e.g.
These proclamations were originally made sixteen times, four times in the term in which the fine was levied, and four times in each of the three succeeding terms.
Royal Proclamation of 1763, organized Britain's vast new North American empire and stabilized relations with Native Americans through regulation of trade, settlement, and land purchases on the western frontier
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Royal_Proclamation   (529 words)

  
 Law Abstracts Hutchings
The Royal Proclamation of 1763, as a law of constitutional significance and manifestly universal application, it is argued, applied to British Columbia, if not as of its enactment in 1763, then either upon the assertion of British Sovereignty over that area or by virtue of the Colonial Laws Validity Act, 1865.
Further it is argued that the proclamation enjoyed the force and effect of an Imperial statute in the colonies to which it applied.
In order to understand fully the import of the Royal Proclamation in the colonies it is necessary to understand British constitutional rules governing the nature and exercise of the Sovereign's prerogative legislative and executive powers in newly acquired territories and the rules governing the Imperial law to which the colonies are subject.
www.library.ubc.ca /law/abstracts/hutchings.html   (674 words)

  
 Proclamation of 1763
In the fall of 1763, a royal decree was issued that prohibited the North American colonists from establishing or maintaining settlements west of an imaginary line running down the crest of the Appalachian Mountains.
The Proclamation of 1763 was a well-intentioned measure.
The King and his council presented the proclamation as a measure to calm the fears of proclamation of 1763 did much to dampen that celebration.
www.u-s-history.com /pages/h1209.html   (667 words)

  
 Volume I 49-53: The Labrador Boundary Dispute Documents
By it, such parts of the coast of Labrador as His Majesty by His Royal Proclamation of the 7th October, 1763, had been pleased to declare he had put under the care and inspection of the Governor of Newfoundland, were re-annexed to the Government of that island.
That Proclamation and the Commission of the 25th April, 1763, of which it proclaimed the effect, are, for the purpose of identifying and defining such parts of the coast, Newfoundland's title.
There can, therefore, be no presumption or other reason for construing the term "coast," as used in the Comission and Proclamation of 1763 and in the Acts cited, in any larger sense than is strictly required for the full attainment of the object which the legislator had in view.
www.heritage.nf.ca /law/lab1/labvol1_39c.html   (859 words)

  
 Proclamation of 1763
Issued on October 2, 1763, the Royal Proclamation of 1763 was intended to regulate the lands west of the Appalachian Mountains awarded to the British in the Treaty of Paris.
In the proclamation, portions of the newly acquired land were organized into the large districts of Quebec, East Florida, West Florida, and Grenada.
The Proclamation of 1763 was extremely unpopular with the colonists and fur traders.
www.mrnussbaum.com /proc1763.htm   (218 words)

  
 Historical Documents - The Proclamation of 1763
Although treaties between the Indians and the colonial officials were reached prior to the Royal Proclamation of 1763, the latter served as a model for the establishment of such arrangements.
In the Proclamation of 1763, King George III of England declared a British system of governing in the areas that had been surrendered by France, and pronounced that the Indians and their lands would be treated with respect.
Despite its curious status vis--vis our Constitution and some of its other deficiencies, the Proclamation of 1763 is still considered a very important document for understanding Indian/government relations and for interpreting the treaties that were born from and guided by it.
www.historicaldocuments.com /Proclamationof1763.htm   (1913 words)

  
 Snake v. Regina
Connecticut; the Royal Proclamation of 1763; and the Convention for the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, 1948.
Hall [(1774), 98 ER 1045 (JCPC)], that the Proclamation of 1763, which was the law of the provinces ceded by the treaty of 1763, was binding upon the king himself, and that a right once granted by a proclamation could not be annulled by a subsequent.
The proclamation of 1763 was undoubtedly the law of the province till 1783: it gave direct authority to the Governors of Florida to grant crown lands, subject only to such conditions and restrictions as they or the King might prescribe.
sisis.nativeweb.org /clark/snake.html   (14434 words)

  
 Proclamation of 1763
The King and his council presented the proclamation as a measure to calm the fears of the Indians, who felt that the colonists would drive them from their lands as they expanded westward.
The proclamation provided that all lands west of the heads of all rivers which flowed into the Atlantic Ocean from the west or northwest were off-limits to the colonists.
The Proclamation line extended from the Atlantic coast at Quebec to the newly established border of West Florida.
www.ushistory.org /declaration/related/proc63.htm   (926 words)

  
 Rational for Indian Reservations
The Royal Proclamation (1763) is a form of constitutional law proclaimed by King George III on October 7, 1763 pronouncing many matters.
The important significance of the Royal Proclamation of 1763 is that it established a constitutional framework for the negotiation of Indian Treaties with the Tribes of Nations.
Despite the Royal Proclamation’s age, it is still significant today to the legal interpretation of Aboriginal and Treaty Rights and their distinct status in Canada.
www.geocities.com /anti_fnga2003/report.html   (3117 words)

  
 Documents, Posters & Signs - Canadian Heritage Gallery
Royal Proclamation of 1763 Issued by the Privy Council in Great Britain, the Royal Proclamation of 1763 was a binding administrative step and a clear expression of imperial government policy for the new British possessions in North America.
Royal Proclamation of 1763 The Royal Proclamation of 1763, issued by the official Privy Council in Great Britain, and an expression of imperial government policy for the new British possessions in America.
Treaty Proclamation The Proclamation of the Peace Treaty of Ghent, with the official announcement by Governor Sir George Prevost at Quebec, March 9, 1815.
www.canadianheritage.org /galleries/documents1100.htm   (398 words)

  
 Royal Proclamation (1763) - Readings - Quebec History
The Royal Proclamation, by abolishing French civil laws, put the seigneurial system in jeopardy and eliminated the legal requirement to pay the tithe to the Roman Catholic Church; two important social institutions of Quebec were thus threatened.
The introduction of the test oath, and the resulting exclusion of the Canadiens from all positions connected to the government of the colony, rendered efficient government impossible as the Canadiens remained the vast majority of the population for decades.
Essentially, what was wrong with the Royal Proclamation was that it was designed for a ‘British’ colony when in fact it was, and was to remain, one peopled by the Canadiens.
www2.marianopolis.edu /quebechistory/readings/royal.htm   (572 words)

  
 Royal Proclamation (1763) - Readings - Quebec History
The Royal Proclamation was the first constitution granted to Quebec by the British Government following the Treaty of Paris of 1763.
The Royal Proclamation, by abolishing French civil laws, put the seigneurial system in jeopardy and eliminated the legal requirement to pay the tithe to the Roman Catholic Church; two important social institutions of Quebec were thus threatened.
Essentially, what was wrong with the Royal Proclamation was that it was designed for a ‘British’ colony when in fact it was, and was to remain, one peopled by the Canadiens.
faculty.marianopolis.edu /c.belanger/quebechistory/readings/royal.htm   (572 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for 1763
Proclamation of 1763 British government edict designed to restrain encroachment on Native American lands by settlers following the French and Indian Wars.
He earned (1763) great unpopularity for his charges of obscenity against John Wilkes, because not only had he been Wilkes's friend but he was himself...
By the Treaty of Paris of 1763, Britain received Florida from Spain, and from France that portion of Louisiana lying between the Mississippi and Perdido rivers (exclusive of New Orleans).
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=1763&StartAt=1   (928 words)

  
 [No title]
Thus, Part II of the Proclamation permitted the Governor of Quebec to "settle and agree" with the inhabitants of the province for such lands as "are now or hereafter shall be in Our power to dispose of".
The Royal Proclamation of 1763 was officially promulgated within the new Province of Quebec by Governor James Murray.
This is reflected in the Royal Proclamation of 1763.
www.cwis.org /fwdp/Americas/algonqin.txt   (8400 words)

  
 CALDER v. ATTORNEY-GENERAL OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
By Proclamation of December 2, 1858, the Governor of British Columbia was enabled to have Crown lands sold within the Colony and was authorized to grant any land belonging to the Crown in the Colony.
These Proclamations and Ordinances reveal a unity of intention to exercise, and the legislative exercising of, absolute sover- eignty over all the lands of British Columbia and such exercise of sover- eignty is inconsistent with any conflicting interests, including one as to "aboriginal title".
Although I think that it is clear that Indian title in British Columbia cannot owe its origin to the Proclamation of 1763, the fact is that when the settlers came, the Indians were there, organized in societies and occupying the land as their fore- fathers had done for centuries.
library2.usask.ca /native/cnlc/vol07/091.html   (17871 words)

  
 Court File Number 87
The Royal Proclamation of 1763 which continues to be the law in Canada by virtue of the Constitution Act, 1982 declared "...
Accordingly, the assumption of court jurisdiction by federal and provincial courts in this unceded indigenous territory, is misprision of treason and fraud within the meaning of the Royal Proclamation of 1763 and deprives the court of its jurisdiction in this matter.
As the Royal Proclamation of 1763 was not properly followed, there is no existing constitutionally valid legal alternative whereby the crown governments and courts can derive jurisdiction over unceded aboriginal territory.
www.cyberclass.net /meddfactum.htm   (1845 words)

  
 The Proclamation Line
To the dismay of the colonial leaders, who expected the defeat of France to increase access to the lands in the Ohio River valley, George III issued the the Royal Proclamation of 1763.
The Proclamation created 4 new colonies from the lands ceded by the French in the 1763 peace treaty.
George III's Proclamation Line may have been consistent with modern "smart growth" principles, but the speculators in the colonies placed a higher priority on increasing their personal wealth rather than reducing the overall coat of government.
www.virginiaplaces.org /settleland/proclamation.html   (495 words)

  
 [No title]
Thus, Part II of the Proclamation permitted the Governor of Quebec to "settle and agree" with the inhabitants of the province for such lands as "are now or hereafter shall be in Our power to dispose of".
The Royal Proclamation of 1763 was officially promulgated within the new Province of Quebec by Governor James Murray.
This is reflected in the Royal Proclamation of 1763.
www.halcyon.com /pub/FWDP/Americas/algonqin.txt   (8400 words)

  
 The Royal Proclamation of 1763 The Quebec Act of 1774
It was Pontiac's revolt and a desire to pacify the Indians rather than a careful examination of the new problems of colonial government which produced the Royal Proclamation of 1763.
Ulitmately it proved to be virtually impossible for Britain authorities to check the western boundaries of the 13 Colonies at the Royal Proclamation line and their attempt to do so was one of the factors that led to the American Revolution.
The Proclamation of 1763 had stressed the introduction of English law and an elected assembly with the idea in mind that English-speaking settlers would stream into Britian's new colony.
www.uppercanadahistory.ca /pp/ppa.html   (3002 words)

  
 Michael Suddard's Homepage - The Proclamation of 1763: A Temporary and Permenant Solution
The reaction, the consequences and the problems of the Proclamation of 1763 took time to be noticed and acknowledged by the officials of the British Crown and the Amerindian nations.
Thus, the American colonial leaders believed that the Proclamation of 1763 was a mere temporary measure before a more permanent solution could be negotiated with Amerindian nations.
The Proclamation of 1763 also came to be a flash point for future relations between North American settlers and Amerindians.
www.michaelsuddard.com /proclamationof1763.html   (3922 words)

  
 Virtual Law Office: Royal Proclamation of 1763
Settlers from the Thirteen Colonies were anxious to move into the Ohio Valley now that it was free of French influence, but the lands were still in the possession of Indian Nations who were rightly suspicious of 'Yankee' motives and resented their intrusion.
The Crown used the Quebec Act, 1774 as a device to re-assert its control within the Proclamation lands by extending the former boundaries of Quebec down to the Ohio River near what is now Pittsburgh, then down the Ohio the Mississippi and north to Rupert's Land.
The Proclamation is not formally part of the Constitution of Canada, but it is referred to in section 25 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
www.bloorstreet.com /200block/rp1763.htm   (1022 words)

  
 [No title]
The policy expressed in the Proclamation was intended to protect the Indians in their exclusive use of their lands, and to establish a formal means by which their interest might be ceded to the Crown.
Dickson J. for the Court held that Royal Commission reports and reports of Parliamentary committees made prior to the passing of a statute were admissible to show the factual context and purpose of the legislation.
The policy [outlined in the Royal Proclamation] adhered to thenceforward, by those responsible for the honour of the Crown, led to many treaties whereby Indians agreed to surrender such rights as they were supposed to have in areas respectively specified in such treaties.
www.uottawa.ca /constitutional-law/metis.html   (18721 words)

  
 Youth Buzz - Helping with Land Claims and Self-Government - NWT Region - Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
In the Royal Proclamation of 1763, the British set out guidelines for its relationship with Aboriginal people that are still relevant today.
This Royal Proclamation described the government's plan of action with Aboriginal peoples.
The Royal Proclamation of 1763 was very significant.
nwt-tno.inac-ainc.gc.ca /youthbuzz/atr-rp_e.htm   (194 words)

  
 THE ROYAL PROCLAMATION
The Royal Proclamation of King George III established the constitutional foundation of British imperial Canada after the defeat of the French army in North America during the Seven Years’ War.
The Proclamation was brought into law when Ottawa Chief Pontiac said he would resist British colonization if there were not proper provisions to "recognize the collectively held title of First Nations peoples to their ancestral lands." (Molloy, pg.
The language in the Proclamation as regards protecting Indians and their lands is really a case of smoke and mirrors.
www.shannonthunderbird.com /royal_proclamation.htm   (1831 words)

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