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Topic: Ruthenian Voivodship


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  voivodship
West Pomeranian Voivodship (Polish: Pomorze Zachodnie; German: Westpommern; Latin: Pomerania Occidentalis) or Zachodnie Pomorze Voivodship (Polish: województwo zachodniopomorskie) is an administrative region or voivodship in northwestern Poland.
It borders on Lubusz, Wielkopolska and Pomorze voivodships.
Seat of the Voivodship Governor (Wojewoda): Lwów Regional Sejmik (sejmik generalny) for all Ruthene lands Sądowa Wisznia Seats of Regional Sejmik (sejmik poselski i deputacki): Lwów Halicz Sądowa Wisznia P...
www.experiencefestival.com /voivodship   (2255 words)

  
  Ruthenian Voivodship   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Silesia (Slask Voivodship) Regional Parliament of the Province of Silesia.
Eperies Diocese of the Greek Ruthenian Rite, suffragan to Gran.
Lemberg Seat of a Latin, a Uniat Ruthenian, and a Uniat Armenian archbishopric.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Ruthenian_Voivodship.html   (203 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Ruthenia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Ruthenian may refer to: Ruthenia, a name applied to various parts of Eastern Europe Ruthenians, the peoples of Ruthenia Ruthenian language, a name applied to several Slavic languages This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title.
The Ruthenian Catholic Church is a sui iuris Catholic Church of the Byzantine Eastern Rite.
Ruthenian was a historic East Slavic language, spoken in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and after 1569 in the East Slavic territories of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Ruthenia   (4811 words)

  
 Podlasie
Between 10th and 13th centuries this are was occupied by Ruthenian tribes speaking in a dialect similar to modern Ukrainian.
Till 14th century this are was part of Ruthenian states, later included into the Grand Duchy of Lithuania.
Untill 19th century Podlasie was populated by Poles and Jews (towns), Polish speaking gentry and Ruthenians - Orthodox and Uniate Catholics - speaking a dialect related to modern Ukrainian language - so called Khakhlak (Chachlak), from the derogatory name of Ukrainians, khakhol, khokhol, referring to their traditional haircut.
www.guajara.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/p/po/podlasie.html   (484 words)

  
 Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Each voivodship had its own parliament (sejmik), which exercised serious political power, including choice of poseł (deputy) to the national Sejm and charging of the deputy with specific voting instructions.
Moreover, the decades of peace brought huge colonization efforts to Ukraine, heightening the tensions among Ruthenian and Polish peasants, Cossacks, Jews and nobles.
Voivodships were further divided into starostwa, each starostwo being governed by a starosta.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Polish-Lithuanian_Commonwealth   (4567 words)

  
 Ruthenia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In the 1880s and 1900s, due to the spread of the name "Ukraine" as a substitute for "Ruthenia" among the Ruthenian/Ukrainian population of the Russian Empire, the name, "Ruthenian" was often restricted to mean western Ukraine, an area then part of the Austro-Hungarian state.
In the early 20th century, the name "Ukraine" was widely accepted in Galicia/Halychyna and the name "Ruthenia" became narrowed to the area south of the Carpathian mountains in the Kingdom of Hungary.
The people of the region rapidly became Slovakicised, because their language is closely related to the Slovak language and because most of them refused to identify themselves as Ukrainians, as the Communist government, after 1953, wished them to do.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ruthenia   (1034 words)

  
 Lublin Voivodship - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Lublin Voivodship (in Polish województwo lubelskie) is an administrative and local government region or voivodship in the eastern part of Poland.
Lublin Voivodship (4) 1921-1939 (Polish: Województwo Lubelskie) was a unit of administrative division and local government in Poland in years 1921-1939.
Lublin Voivodship (5) 14th c.-1795 (Latin: Palatinatus Lublinensis, Polish: Województwo Lubelskie) was a unit of administrative division and local government in the Kingdom of Poland created in 16th century out of parts of Sandomierz Voivodship till the partitions of Poland in 1795.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Lublin_Voivodship   (251 words)

  
 Podlasie - Slider
Between the 10th and the 13th centuries this area was occupied by Ruthenian tribes speaking a form of proto-Belarussian.
Until the 14th century this area was part of Ruthenian states, later included into the Grand Duchy of Lithuania.
Until the 19th century Podlasie was populated by Poles and Jews (towns), Polish speaking gentry and Ruthenians – Orthodox and Uniate Catholics – speaking a dialect related to modern Belarussian language.
enc.slider.com /Enc/Podlachia   (549 words)

  
 Galicia (Central Europe)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The sister state of Volynia, together with Kyiv, then fell under Lithuanian control and the mantle of Rus' was transferred from Halych-Volynia to Lithuania.
This began an era of heavy Polish settlement among the Ruthenian population.
L'viv -- Lemberg served as the capital of Austrian Galicia, which was dominated by the Polish aristocracy, despite the fact that the population of the eastern half of the province was in the majority Ruthenian or Ukrainian with large minorities of Jews and Poles.
www.uncover.us /en/wikipedia/g/ga/galicia__central_europe_.html   (757 words)

  
 Podlasie - Surch
At present the name of Podlasie is used especially for Polish part of the region, which is traditionally divided between North (north of Western Bug River) and South Podlasie.
Between 10th and 13th centuries this area was occupied by Ruthenian tribes speaking in a dialect similar to modern Ukrainian.
Until the 19th century Podlasie was populated by Poles and Jews (towns), Polish speaking gentry and Ruthenians - Orthodox and Uniate Catholics - speaking a dialect related to modern Ukrainian language - so called Khakhlak (Chachlak), from the derogatory name of Ukrainians, khakhol, khokhol, referring to their traditional haircut.
www.surch.co.uk /-/Podlasie.html   (584 words)

  
 Ruthenian Voivodship - Definition, explanation
The Ruthenian Voivodship (Polish: Województwo Ruskie) (1366-1772) was a unit of administrative division and local government in the Kingdom of Poland.
Together with the Bełz Voivodship; it formed the Red Ruthenia province.
Regional council (sejmik generalny) for all Ruthenian lands
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/r/ru/ruthenian_voivodship.php   (91 words)

  
 Lublin Voivodship   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Lublin voivodship since 1999 Lublin Voivodship (in Polish wojew&243;dztwo lubelskie) is an administrative and local government region or voivodship in the eastern part of Poland.
Lublin voivodship 1975-1999 Lublin Voivodship (2) 1975-1998 (Polish: województwo lubelskie) was a unit of administrative division and local government in Poland in years 1975-1998, superseded by Lublin Voivodship (1)
Capital city: Lublin ---- Lublin Voivodship (5) 14th c.-1795 (Latin: Palatinatus Lublinensis, Polish: Województwo Lubelskie) was a unit of administrative division and local government in the Kingdom of Poland created in 16th century out of parts of Sandomierz Voivodship till the partitions of Poland in 1795.
lublin-voivodship.area51.ipupdater.com   (297 words)

  
 Volhynian Voivodship
Volhynian Voivodship (województwo wołyńskie) was one of the 16 voivodships of Poland prior to 1939 in Second Polish Republic and Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.
Volhynian Voivodship (Polish: Województwo Wołyńskie, Latin: Palatinatus Volhynensis) was a unit of administrative division and local government in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania from 14th century till 1569 and in the Kingdom of Poland (the Crown) since 1569 till the partitions of Poland in 1795.
It was part of Little Poland province and belonged to its Ruthenian (or Ukrainian regions).
www.1bx.com /en/Wolynian_Voivodship.htm   (176 words)

  
 Vorfahren der Butschals- Territorien und Herkunft
As the Ruthenian invasion of Polish Grody Czerwienskie in 981 AD cut this land off the main body of Poles, Lekhian history after that date intertwines with the history of Altaic and Mongol invasions from the east.
It is also unlikely that in the system of serfdom and slavery, introduced to the Ruthenians with the Byzantine culture, that the migration of individuals from the Ruthenian culture to the Lekhian lands was possible.
It is thus evident that Ruthenian rule was merely a military occupation, with its main purpose being the collection of tribute from the conquered people.
www.butschal.de /herbbutschal/podolia.htm   (6160 words)

  
 Ireland Information Guide , Irish, Counties, Facts, Statistics, Tourism, Culture, How
It gave rise to an alternative name for "Pole": Lach in Ruthenian, Lyakh in Russian, as well as to old German Lechien, Hungarian Lengyel and Lithuanian lenkas.
The Ombudsman has the duty of guarding the observance and implementation of the rights and liberties of the human being and of the citizen, the law and principles of community life and social justice.
The Polish landscape consists almost entirely of the lowlands of the North European Plain, at an average height of 173 metres, though the Sudetes (including the Karkonosze) and the Carpathian Mountains (including the Tatra mountains, where one also finds Poland's highest point, Rysy, at 2,499 m.) form the southern border.
www.irelandinformationguide.com /Poland   (1758 words)

  
 Ruthenia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
From 1840 on, nationalists encouraged people to give up the name "Little Rus" for Ukrayina.
The name "Ruthenia" became largely identical with Carpathian Ruthenia, i.e.
A Ruthenian minority also remained in northeastern Czechoslovakia (now Slovakia) after World War II.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ruthenia   (1034 words)

  
 Masovia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
During the chaos following the death of Mieszko II in 1033 and the subsequent invasion by the Czechs, it split temporarily from Poland under an independent ruler.
It was then subdued by Casimir I of Poland in 1039 with help from Ruthenian units.
In 1997 the Masovian Voivodship was created as one of 16 administrative regions of Poland.
copernicus.subdomain.de /Masovia   (234 words)

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