Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Ruthenians


  
  Ruthenians - LoveToKnow 1911
The Ruthenians were separated from the bulk of Russians by the accident of the two feudal principalities of the old Red Russia, Halic and Volhynia, having fallen to Lithuania, which in turn was united with Poland.
Throughout Galicia the Poles form the aristocracy, though in two-thirds of it Ruthenians form the bulk of the population, while the middle class is Jewish or German.
The Ruthenians are therefore under an alien yoke both politically and economically: in religion they mostly belong to the Uniate Church, acknowledging the Pope but retaining their Slavonic liturgy and most of the outward forms of the Greek Church.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Ruthenians   (304 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Ruthenians
Ruthenians along the borderland of the ancient Kingdom of Poland and the present boundary separating Austria from Russia proper are also called Ukrainians (u, at or near, and krai, the border or land composing the border), from the Ukraine, comprising the vast steppes or plains of Southern Russia extending into Galicia.
Ruthenian (Rutheni) is found for the first time in the old Polish annalist, Martinus Gallus, who wrote towards the end of the eleventh and the beginning of the twelfth century; he uses this name as one already well known.
Ruthenian Greek Catholic Church in Austria-Hungary is represented by one province in Galicia, Austria, and three dioceses in Hungary.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/13278a.htm   (2142 words)

  
 ruthenians
Today's distribution of Ruthenian population shows that Bačka remained the center of their territorial concentration, and Ruski Kerstur, with little over 5000 inhabitants represents the largest in number settlement and the cultural center of Ruthenian community in Serbia.
Language of Vojvodina Ruthenians (»Ruski jazik«, »Ruthenian language«) is accepted in Vojvodina as one of six official languages and it represents fundamental feature of their specific ethnicity and confirmation of their cultural identity.
The fact that Ruthenian community was established on such foundation and has maintained and developed own institutions between 1918 and 1941 points to the conclusion that one should not fear the future under the conditions of stable political and social circumstances and economic development of the State.
rdsa.tripod.com /ruthenians.html   (1564 words)

  
 Ruthenians
The Ruthenians or Little Russians in Russia and Bukowina belong to the Greek Orthodox Church, whilst those of Galicia and Hungary are Greek Catholics in unity with the Holy See.
The name Ruthenian (Rutheni) is found for the first time in the old Polish annalist, Martinus Gallus, who wrote towards the end of the eleventh and the beginning of the twelfth century; he uses this name as one already well known.
The Ruthenian language is very close to the Russian and both are descendants of the ancient Slavonic tongue which is still used in the Mass and in the liturgical books.
www.catholicity.com /encyclopedia/r/ruthenians.html   (2026 words)

  
 Ruthenians, Immigration and the Greek Catholic Church in Passaic, New Jersey: 1890 to 1930 Part I: Historical Background   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Ruthenians, Immigration and the Greek Catholic Church in Passaic, New Jersey: 1890 to 1930
The Ruthenians were refugees from the poverty and socio-political discrimination which oppressed them in their native lands, but here in America they also experienced some of these same ugly forms of discrimination and sometimes even from the hands of individuals of their own heritage when the religious issues started to brew here in America.
There was the founding, by mainly Ruthenians, of a bible-reading sect church that had its base in Proctor, Vermont but had a branch in Passaic, New Jersey and offered their own publication Proroczeskoesvitlo/The Prophetic Light and maintained ties to the Ruthenian heritage in their publication from 1921 to 1953.
www.rusyn.com /ruthenians.htm   (3154 words)

  
 Ruthenians in Slovakia fighting for their rights
Slovak Ruthenians have been demanding the right to declare their nationality "without limits and conditions" since 1989.The Slovak government however, according to Lipinsky, is subject to pressure exerted by Ukraine, which views endeavours to recognise a separate Ruthenian nationality as anti-Ukrainian.
Slovak Ruthenians who are "fighting" to for the right to have their nationality acknowledged, are annoyed by the alleged decree of the Ukrainian government office for ethinic minority affairs in October which warned against using the title Ruthenian.
The codification of Ruthenian as a literary language was announced by Ruthenian Revival in 1995 and was supported by the Greek Catholic and Orthodox churches and Matica Slovenska (an educational and cultural organisation established last century).
www.lemko.org /rusyn/ctk.html   (711 words)

  
 Ruthenians   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Ruthenians is name applied to different ethnicities in different points of time; for fuller explanation of reasons for this, see Ruthenia.
Union of Brest A city in Lithuania famous for the union of the Ruthenians with Catholicism.
Brest, Union of A city in Lithuania, famous in the history of the Catholic Church and the Orthodox Church of Russia for the union of the Ruthenians with Catholicism.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Ruthenians.html   (247 words)

  
 ruthenians
Today's distribution of Ruthenian population shows that Bačka remained the center of their territorial concentration, and Ruski Kerstur, with little over 5000 inhabitants represents the largest in number settlement and the cultural center of Ruthenian community in Serbia.
Language of Vojvodina Ruthenians (»Ruski jazik«, »Ruthenian language«) is accepted in Vojvodina as one of six official languages and it represents fundamental feature of their specific ethnicity and confirmation of their cultural identity.
The fact that Ruthenian community was established on such foundation and has maintained and developed own institutions between 1918 and 1941 points to the conclusion that one should not fear the future under the conditions of stable political and social circumstances and economic development of the State.
members.tripod.com /~rdsa/ruthenians.html   (1564 words)

  
 Ruthenians
The name Ruthenian (Rutheni) is found for the first time in the old Polish annalist, Martinus Gallus, who wrote towards the end of the eleventh and the beginning of the twelfth century; he uses this name as one already well known.
Indeed the word "Ruthenian" is considerably older than the word "Russian", in describing Slavic nationality; for the term Russia (Rossia), indicating the political state and government, did not come into use until the fourteenth or fifteenth century.
The Ruthenian language is very close to the Russian and both are descendants of the ancient Slavonic tongue which is still used in the Mass and in the liturgical books.
solejar.tripod.com /rizne/catholic_encyclopedia.htm   (1986 words)

  
 Ruthenians
Ukrainians and Belarusians of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth as distinct from the Russians, who were designated Moscovitae.
After the partitions of Poland (1772–95) the term ‘Ruthenian’ underwent further restriction.
Ruthenians.’ In the interwar era the name ‘Ruthenian’ became even more restricted: it was generally used to refer to the inhabitants of
www.encyclopediaofukraine.com /pages/R/U/Ruthenians.htm   (388 words)

  
 Papuga, Daniel Winfree: Roots and Cyberspace: Linking the Ruthenian diaspora
Being on the perifery of the empire, the ruthenians were eventually allowed to keep their rites as long as they showed that they accepted the hierarchy of the Catholic church, by acknowledging the Pope as their religious leader.
The Ruthenians "were asked to accept the theology of the Western Church (...) But they were assured that they would not have to alter their ´practical religion´, i.e., Orthodoxy" (Hann 1993:203).
Ruthenian transit from the carpathians began in the mid 18th century, when local peasants were given land in the Vojvodina, along southern border of Austria-Hungary in order to hinder the further expansion of the Ottoman empire.
www.anthrobase.com /Txt/P/Papuga_D_W_01.htm   (2088 words)

  
 The Subcarpathian Ruthenians
Subcarpathian Ruthenians or Rusins (the terms are interchangeable) participated in the era of the "new" immigration from its very first years.
The nineteenth century Ruthenian immigrants have been very frankly described by one historian as "refugees" from the poverty and socio-political discrimination which oppressed them in their native lands.
The small number of Ruthenian immigrants that arrived in the United States during the early 1870's settled in the New England area and engaged in farming or in the nonskilled labor available in the port cities.
www.carpatho-rusyn.org /gcu1.htm   (3386 words)

  
 Orientales Omnes Ecclesias
In 1585 the Ruthenian nobles, meeting together in Warsaw, asserted, in the course of a sharp and vivid exposition to the metropolitan of their grievances, that their Church was plagued by greater evils than had ever previously existed or could ever be in the future.
On 23rd December 1595 the emissaries were admitted to the presence of the supreme pontiff; they read the declaration of all the bishops before the illustrious assembly and then in their own name and that of the other bishops made a solemn profession of faith and promised due obedience and respect.
They also decreed that the Ruthenians should not be at a disadvantage compared with the rest of Catholics as regards the distribution of spiritual favors; they wished them to share with the rest of the faithful in all grants of indulgences, on condition that they should also fulfill the necessary conditions.
www.vatican.va /holy_father/pius_xii/encyclicals/documents/hf_p-xii_enc_23121945_orientales-omnes-ecclesias_en.html   (5822 words)

  
 Czech Republic the Emergence of Subcarpathian Ruthenia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Poor peasants, grazers, and lumbermen, the Ruthenians were vassals and serfs of the Hungarian magnates dominating the plains of the Tisza River.
Ruthenian delegates did, however, attend the Slavic Congress in 1848 and later appealed to Vienna for autonomy and the right of cultural development.
The Ruthenian revival was fueled further by a vigorous movement in Galicia (under Austrian administration).
www.country-studies.com /czech-republic/the-emergence-of-subcarpathian-ruthenia.html   (333 words)

  
 Carpatho-Rusyn Background
Ruthenian immigrants who came to the United States of America had found freedoms that were denied them in their former homelands.
The Ruthenians were colonists in what was uninhabited lands and since they originally inhabited areas where there were no settlements, it was easier for them to retain many of their customs and language (whether secular or sacred.) This could be a good reason why so many stayed in non-productive areas.
As more Ruthenians heard of what was available and stories grew of the wealth of America (real and imagined) their imaginations were fueled to the point culminating with the floodgates opening and great numbers began the journey.
www.tccweb.org /rusynback.htm   (17512 words)

  
 Catholic Encyclopedia | Catholic Library - Union of Brest   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Ruthenian clergy were steeped in immorality and ignorance; the bishops made no scruple of setting their flocks an evil example, living in open concubinage, and practising the most brazen simony.
Finding that some of the Orthodox Ruthenians did not conceal their desire for reconciliation with Rome, Jeremias II, to bind them more closely to his own authority and the Orthodox Church, by a decree of 6 August, 1589, appointed Cyril Terlecki, Bishop of Lutzk, his exarch for the metropolitan jurisdiction of Kieff.
On 24 June, 1594, the Ruthenian bishops again assembled at Brest, but their meeting had no synodal character, as Sigismund III was in Sweden, and no synod could be held in the absence of the sovereign.
www.catholiclibrary.com /index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=7772&Itemid=57945794   (1936 words)

  
 HalGal: Ruthenia and Ruthenians
These terms Ruthenia and Ruthenians are often used during the times of the Austrian Empire (and in modern writings about the Austrian Empire) to mean Ukraine and Ukrainians found in the empire (in its province of Galicia, what is today western Ukraine).
There was a conscious effort on the part of Poland, then subsequently the Austrian Empire, to keep the Ruthenians from acknowledging their common ties with the millions of Ukrainians living across the border in the Russian Empire.
The term Ruthenians is also used for a group of people living in the Carpathian mountains.
www.halgal.com /ruthenian.html   (750 words)

  
 Info and On-line Booking Cultural Specialized Lviv
The origins of the city lie in a castle that was errected by the Ruthenian ruler Danylo Romanovyc on the nearby castle mountain in the middle of the 13th century.
Besides Poles and Ruthenians (Ukrainians) its inhabitants were Germans, Jewish and Armenians who dominated the early appearance of the city.
When Lviv, that meanwhile had becom the seat of the bishop of the orthodox as well as the catholic church, fell to Austria as a consequence of the first "Polish separation" the city, that from now on was named Lemberg, lived through a new cultural hey days that many buidings still bear witness to.
www.lviv-travel.com   (704 words)

  
 About Slovakia - hotels, hostels, B&B's, campsites and other accommodation
Up to 8% of the population are Romany people who live mainly in the East of the country.
Other larger ethnic minorities are Ruthenians, Ukrainians, Czechs, Poles, and Germans.
Slovakia has a typical mild continental European climate.
www.hotels-slovakia.com /about-slovakia.php   (218 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.