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Topic: Saladin


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  PBS - Islam: Empire of Faith - Profiles - Saladin
Saladin, the Western name for the ruler Salah al-Din ibn Ayyub, was the great Muslim general who confronted the Crusaders in the Near East.
Born to a Kurdish family active in Syria, Saladin reestablished a Sunni regime in Egypt in 1171 by putting an end to the last Shiite Fatimid caliph there.
Saladin waited to take possession of the city until October 2, because the date corresponded with the anniversary of the Prophet's miraculous ascension to heaven, according to the Muslim calendar.
www.pbs.org /empires/islam/profilessaladin.html   (258 words)

  
 Saladin — Salah al-Din al-Ayubbi
Known as Saladin in the West, Salah al Din al Ayubi was born in 1138 in Tikrit.
Saladin, a Kurdish warrior, became the Sultan of Egypt and known as a champion of Islam.
Saladin united the efforts of Egypt and Baghdad, and preached to the Muslim world to rise in a Jihad, a Holy War, a counter crusade, of all the Muslims against the Christians.
www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org /jsource/biography/Saladin.html   (408 words)

  
 Saladin
Saladin was of Kurdish heritage, and all through his career he used mainly Kurdish officials as his closest partners.
Saladin managed to revitalize the economy of Egypt, he reorganized the military forces and with the advice of his father, he stayed away from any conflicts with Nureddin, his formal lord, after he had become the real ruler over Egypt.
1176: Saladin besieges the fortress of Masyaf, the stronghold of Rashideddin.
www.i-cias.com /e.o/saladin.htm   (481 words)

  
 Saladin (Salah al-Din Yusuf Ibn Ayyub)
Saladin (1138-1193) was born into a prominent Kurdish family, and it is said that on the night of his birth, his father, Najm ad-Din Ayyub, gathered his family and moved to Aleppo.
Saladin brought an entirely different concept of a city to Cairo after the Fatimids, because he wanted a unified, thriving, fortified place, protected by strong walls and impregnable defenses, but functioning internally with a great deal of commercial and cultural freedom, and with no private or royal enclaves and no fabulous palaces.
Saladin opened the palaces of al-Qahira (Cairo) and sold off the fabled treasure of the Fatimids, including a 2,400 carat ruby, and an emerald four fingers in length and the caliph's splendid library, to pay his Turkish troops.
www.touregypt.net /featurestories/saladin.htm   (2044 words)

  
  Saladin (Salah al-Din Yusuf Ibn Ayyub)
Saladin (1138-1193) was born into a prominent Kurdish family, and it is said that on the night of his birth, his father, Najm ad-Din Ayyub, gathered his family and moved to Aleppo.
Saladin brought an entirely different concept of a city to Cairo after the Fatimids, because he wanted a unified, thriving, fortified place, protected by strong walls and impregnable defenses, but functioning internally with a great deal of commercial and cultural freedom, and with no private or royal enclaves and no fabulous palaces.
1176: Saladin besieges the fortress of Masyaf, the stronghold of Rashideddin.
touregypt.net /featurestories/saladin.htm   (2044 words)

  
  NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Saladin   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The statue of Saladin at the entrance of the citadel in Damascus.
Saladin is renowned in both the Muslim and Christian worlds for his leadership and military prowess, tempered by his chivalry and merciful nature, during the Crusades, to the extent that myths and legends were also developed in the west.
Saladin was tutored in the military arts by his uncle, a general in Aleppo, before becoming the ruler of Egypt in 1169 and of Aleppo in 1183.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Saladin   (762 words)

  
  Saladin - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Saladin   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Saladin believed in jihad (holy war) – the Muslim equivalent of the crusades.
Saladin was tutored in the military arts by his uncle, a general in Aleppo, before becoming the ruler of Egypt in 1169 and of Aleppo in 1183.
Saladin was eventually put on the defensive by the Christian Siege of Acre (1189–91), which was successful after the arrival of Richard the Lion-heart and other crusaders, and by his defeat by Richard at Arsuf in 1191.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /Saladin   (537 words)

  
 Saladin - LoveToKnow 1911
Saladin was therefore educated in the most famous centre of Moslem learning, and represented the best traditions of Moslem culture.
To Nur-ed-din he was invariably submissive, but from the vigour which he employed in adding to the fortifications of Cairo and the haste with which he retreated from an attack on Montreal (1171) and Kerak (1173) it is clear that he feared his lord's jealousy.
Saladin's lack of a fleet enabled the Christians to receive reinforcements and thus recover from their defeats by land.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Saladin   (1298 words)

  
 Saladin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Saladin was born into a Kurdish family in Tikrit and was sent to Damascus to finish his education.
In retaliation, Saladin besieged Kerak, Raynald's fortress in Oultrejordain, in 1183 and 1184.
Saladin is buried in a mausoleum in the garden outside the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus, Syria.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Saladin   (2150 words)

  
 Saladin
Saladin was born into a Kurdish family in near the river and was sent to to finish his education.
In retaliation, Saladin besieged Kerak, Raynald's fortress in Oultrejordain, in 1183 and 1184.
Saladin's relationship with Richard was one of chivalrous mutual respect as well as military rivalry; both were celebrated in the courtly romances that developed in Northern Europe.
www.users.bigpond.net.au /gary_fletcher/saladin.html   (1295 words)

  
 Saladin   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The battle of montgisard was fought between saladin and the kingdom of jerusalem on november 25, 1177....
The saladin tithe, or the aid of 1188, was a tax, or more specifically a tallage, levied in england and to some extent in france in 1188,...
Saladin's relationship with Richard was one of chivalrous mutual respect as well as military rivalry; both were celebrated in the courtly romance courtly romance quick summary:
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/s/sa/saladin.htm   (3555 words)

  
 Saladin - Salah al-Din Yusuf bin Ayub
Salah al-Din Yusuf bin Ayub or Saladin as he is popularly known was born in 1138 C.E. and was of Kurdish descent.
Another mentor of the young Saladin was the Saracen chief Zenghi who in 1144 overthrew the city of Edessa, an outpost of Western world for many years prior because of its proximity to Antioch.
Saladin died March 3rd 1193 at the age of 55.
www.angelfire.com /realm/shades/demons/biblic/saladin.htm   (359 words)

  
 Saudi Aramco World : Saladin: Story of a Hero   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Saladin, son of a high-ranking Kurdish officer in Nur al-Din's army, was an Arab by culture, language and inclination.
Saladin, having fulfilled his oath, withdrew to Damascus where, at the age of 55, he died, already a hero and soon to be a legend.
When the garrison of Kerak was finally starved into surrendering, Saladin returned the son to his mother, and to top it all rewarded the garrison for its bravery in fighting without its commander: he bought back their wives and children from the Bedouin of the area who had taken them in exchange for food.
www.saudiaramcoworld.com /issue/197003/saladin-story.of.a.hero.htm   (2954 words)

  
 The Mediadrome - History - Saladin
More than one hundred years before Saladin united the Islam nations, the Seljuk Turks were a powerful force claiming land from their original home in central Asia, all the way to southern Russia and northern Syria.
Saladin would never have agreed to such terms, but before he had a chance to protest, Richard and Philip claimed the city.
Saladin was a military icon whose high standards set him apart from those who claimed to be his equals.
www.themediadrome.com /content/articles/history_articles/saladin.htm   (2348 words)

  
 Saladin Biography | Encyclopedia of World Biography
Saladin (1138-1193), a Kurdish ruler of Egypt and Syria, is known in the West for his opposition to the forces of the Third Crusade and for his capture of Jerusalem.
Saladin Arabic, Salah-ad-Din Yusuf ibn Aiyub) served with his uncle, Shirkuh, under Nur-ad-Din and was strongly impressed with the need to complete the unity of Islam under orthodox rule.
Saladin is described in the pages of his biographer, Baha ad-Din, as one who was entirely committed to the justice of the jihad against the unbelievers.
www.bookrags.com /biography/saladin   (735 words)

  
 The Knights Templar | Saladin - Salah al-Din Yusuf bin Ayub | www.templarhistory.com
Salah al-Din Yusuf bin Ayub or Saladin as he is popularly known was born in 1138 C.E. and was of Kurdish descent.
Another mentor of the young Saladin was the Saracen chief Zenghi who in 1144 overthrew the city of Edessa, an outpost of Western world for many years prior because of its proximity to Antioch.
Saladin died March 3rd 1193 at the age of 55.
www.templarhistory.com /saladin.html   (421 words)

  
 Exclusive Medieval Articles - Richard and Saladin: Warriors of the Third Crusade
Saladin was unable to break the Christians' blockade, and the city fell to the crusading kings in a little over a month, after which Philip departed to return to the West and Richard turned south toward Jaffa.
Saladin's faith seems to be of prime importance, since the section dealing with this topic is the first to appear in the biography.
Saladin "spoke of nothing else [other than Holy War]...[and] had little sympathy with anyone else who spoke of anything else or encouraged any other activity."70 It is possible that Bahā' al-Dín is attempting to make it seem that Saladin was more concerned with Holy War than he was in reality.
www.shadowedrealm.com /articles/exclusive/article.php?id=17   (4466 words)

  
 Assassins- Saladin   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Saladin, the deliverer of Jerusalem and a famously chivalric knight, was born in Tikrit, Iraq, in 1137.
Saladin delivered his people’s land out of Christian hands and recaptured the city of Jerusalem.
After the death of Nur ad-din in 1174, Saladin became the Sultan of Egypt and declared war upon the son of Nur ad-din, As-Salih Ismail.
library.thinkquest.org /05aug/00158/saladin1.html   (248 words)

  
 Saladin   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Though Bernard's words served as a precursor to the Second Crusade they are important when examining the life of Saladin, for in his life and actions this man, destined to become the greatest of the aforementioned pagans, would exemplify none of the traits one would expect of a horrible infidel.
Saladin, or Salah al - Din, was born in 1138 into a Kurdish military family at Takrit in present - day Iraq.
It is Saladin's adherence to the chivalric ideals of justice and magnanimity as well as his combat expertise that gave this pagan a unique place in the pantheon of chivalric heroes.
faculty.smu.edu /bwheeler/Ency/saladin.html   (867 words)

  
 ::Saladin::
Saladin and Richard the Lionheart are two names that tend to dominate the Crusades.
The more successful Saladin was, the more he was seen by the Muslims as being their natural leader.
Saladin had agreed to pay a ransom for them but somehow there was a breakdown in the process of payment and Richard ordered their execution.
www.historylearningsite.co.uk /Saladin.htm   (873 words)

  
 FSM Discussion :: View topic - The Life of Saladin, by Beha ed-Din
Saladin, perhaps best known for his struggles in the Third Crusade with Richard the Lionhearted, would probably prefer to be remembered for his stunning earlier success at the Battle of Hattin, where he crushed the Christian army and subsequently restored Jerusalem to Moslem rule after 95 years as the ‘Kingdom of Jerusalem’.
Saladin was also known for his generosity, which led the people of many small fortified cities to lay down their arms rather than fight, knowing that they would be spared.
Saladin believed at the time of his death that the crusaders would ultimately return, but he could not have foreseen the conclusion of the Fourth Crusade, which resulted in the Sack of Constantinople and never reached the Holy Land.
www.venganza.org /forum/viewtopic.php?t=5102&sid=364865910777f21e4d8b1f29c2a547a7   (1806 words)

  
 slahadin
In Cairo, Saladin not only built mosques and palaces (in fact he did not build a palace for himself), but also colleges, hospitals,and a fortress, the Citadel, which still remains one of Cairo's landmarks to this day.
Despite Saladin's relentless military and diplomatic efforts a Christian land and naval blockade forced the surrender of the Palestinian stronghold of Acre in 1191, but the Crusaders failed to follow up this victory in their quest for Jerusalem.
In 1192 Saladin concluded an armistice agreement with King Richard I of England that allowed the Crusaders to reconstitute their kingdom along the Palestinian-Syrian coast but left Jerusalem in Muslim hands.
members.tripod.com /~snowlion2/slahadin.html   (712 words)

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