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Topic: Samguk Yusa


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In the News (Sun 18 Aug 19)

  
  Samguk Yusa - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Samguk Yusa, or Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms, is a collection of legends, folktales, and historical accounts relating to the Three Kingdoms of Korea (Goguryeo, Baekje and Silla), as well as to other periods and states before, during, and after the Three Kingdoms period.
It was compiled, at least in part, by the Buddhist monk Illyeon (1206-1289) at the end of the 13th century, a century after the Samguk Sagi.
Unlike the more factually-oriented Samguk Sagi, the Samguk Yusa focuses on various folktales, legends, and biographies from early Korean history.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Samguk_Yusa   (272 words)

  
 Samguk Sagi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Samguk Sagi (Chronicles of the Three Kingdoms) is a historical record of the Three Kingdoms of Korea: Goguryeo, Baekje and Silla.
The Samguk Sagi was written in Classical Chinese (as used in writing by Korean scholars at the time) and compiled by the Korean historian Kim Busik (金富軾) in 1145.
Some modern historians are critical of the records provided in Samguk Sagi, citing a bias towards China and the Silla-centered view of the Three Kingdoms period.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Samguk_Sagi   (235 words)

  
 Dangun - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
The Samguk Yusa say Dangun ascended to the throne in the 50th year of Yao's reign, while says the first year and Dongguk Tonggam says the 25th year.
In addition, the Samguk Sagi--the oldest existing history book in Korea--makes no mention of Dangun, leading some people to theorize that the myth was formed some time between the 10th and 13th centuries.
A later work, the Samguk Yusa, which was meant to be a supplement of Samguk Sagi, describes more about Danguns.
www.sterlingheights.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Dangun   (941 words)

  
 Samguk Yusa
Samguk Yusa (삼국 유사 (三國遺事) in Korean) is a collection of legends, folktales, and historical accounts relating to the so-called Three Kingdoms of Korea (Goguryeo, Baekje and Silla), as well as to other periods and states before, during, and after the Three Kingdoms period.
The text was written in Classical Chinese (as used in writing by literate Koreans at that time) by the Buddhist monk Ilyon (1206-1289) at the end of the 13th century, a century after the Samguk Sagi.
Nevertheless, Samguk Yusa is the oldest existing record today of Dangun.
pedia.newsfilter.co.uk /wikipedia/s/sa/samguk_yusa.html   (216 words)

  
 The Myth of Hwarang
Samguk Sagi quotes Hwarang Segi by Kim Daemun, which says, "Bright ministers and loyal subjects are brought up here, and good generals and brave soldiers are born therefrom." It is clear that Hwarang in itself was not a warrior group.
This was partly because the author of Samuguk Yusa was a Buddhist monk.
And according to Samguk Yusa, the famous Buddhist monk Won-gwang taught Sesok-ogye to Kwisan and Chuhang, who later joined the army and won martial glory, but nothing says that they were Hwarang members.
www.geocities.com /neue_strassenbahn/hwarang.html   (840 words)

  
 creation_myths_in_korea_and_japan
Samguk sagi was set down by a high official of the Koryo Dynasty, Pu-sik Kim, in Chinese.
Samguk yusa, on the other hand, was also compiled under the Koryo Dynasty, but by the National Priest Ilyon a century later (the 13th century) in order to better understand his country's history.
Samguk Yusa: Legends and History of the Three Kingdoms of Ancient Korea.
www.meta-religion.com /World_Religions/Ancient_religions/Asia/creation_myths_in_korea_and_japan.htm   (1946 words)

  
 Baekje   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
According to the ''Samguk Sagi'', Baekje was founded in 18 BC by King Onjo of BaekjeKing Onjo, who led a group of people from FuyuBuyeo in Manchuria to the Han River/ region of Korea.
However, according to ''Samguk Yusa'', King Onjo was the son of Jumong (King Dongmyeongseong of GoguryeoKing Dongmyeongseong), the founder of Goguryeo.
According to the ''Samguk Yusa'', during the Sabi period the chief minister (or ''jaesang'', 재상) of Baekje was chosen by a unique system.
www.infothis.com /find/Baekje   (2577 words)

  
 [No title]
Samguk Sagi, the History of the Three Kingdoms was an official history of the Three Kingdoms in annalistic form compiled in 1145 by Kim Pu-shik.
Samguk Yusa, the Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms was much different.
Samguk Yusa was much more interesting reading in that it compiled a lot of oral literature and helped us understand the cultural and religious undertones of Korean history.
www.essaycity.com /free_essays/00812.txt   (1376 words)

  
 An Introduction to the Samguk sagi
The compilation of the Samguk sagi was an officially sponsored undertaking, commissioned by the Koryô king, with the members of its compilation staff approved by the central bureaucracy.
The fact that "native heritage" is primarily interpreted by the Samguk sagi to mean "Silla heritage", however, brings us to the work’s ostensibly broader purpose, and that was to promote Silla as the orthodox ruling kingdom of the peninsula, and to thus solidify the legitimacy and prestige of the Koryô state, as Silla’s rightful successor.
The nearly contemporary record of historical events on the peninsula, the Samguk yusa, compiled by the monk Iryôn (1206-1289) in an unofficial capacity, is much different in tone and outlook, recording fantastic events and legends in an effort to bolster the Buddhist faith.
www2.hawaii.edu /~dkane/Intro.htm   (5102 words)

  
 Three Kingdoms of Korea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Three Kingdoms period in Korea is usually considered to run from the 1st century BCE (overlapping with the Samhan period in southern Korea) until Silla's triumph over Goguryeo in 668 (resulting in Unified Silla and Balhae states).
The name "Samguk", or "Three Kingdoms", was used in the Korean titles of the classic texts Samguk Sagi and Samguk Yusa, both written in the 12th century.
During the Han dynasty, four commanderies were established in northern parts of the Korean peninsula (the exact locations are disputed).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Three_Kingdoms_of_Korea   (931 words)

  
 Science Fair Projects - Hwarang
Samguk Sagi and Samguk Yusa record stories about the origin of Hwarang.
Samguk Yusa also says that they learned the Five Cardinal Confucian Virtues, the Six Arts, the Three Scholarly Occupations, and the Six Ways of Government Service (五常六藝 三師六正).
According to the Hwarang Segi, cited by Samguk Sagi, wise ministers and loyal subjects were chosen from them, and good generals and brave soldiers sprang from them.
www.all-science-fair-projects.com /science_fair_projects_encyclopedia/Hwarang   (456 words)

  
 Baekje biography .ms   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
According to the Samguk Sagi, Baekje was founded in 18 BC by King Onjo, who led a group of people from Buyeo in Manchuria to the Han River region of Korea.
However, according to Samguk Yusa, King Onjo was the son of Jumong (King Dongmyeongseong), the founder of Goguryeo.
Jumong escaped from Buyeo, where he was persecuted, to the Jolbon area, where he married the daughter of a local leader and founded the kingdom of Goguryeo.
baekje.biography.ms   (2483 words)

  
 [No title]
According to the Samguk Yusa, in 381, the monk Marananta came to Paekche from Eastern Chin and was warmly welcomed by the kingÕs court.
(Samguk Yusa, 178) However, it should be noted that this does not necessarily mean transmission of Chinese Buddhism because not only the year 384 was barely three years after Buddhism was formally accepted in China, Marananta was not a Chinese monk but an Indian monk who was happening to be sojourning in Eastern Chin.
It is recorded in the Samguk Yusa that Chajang had great desires to travel to the west to learn the transforming teachings there and was granted this wish when he made his way to Tang China in 636.
www.dpg.devry.edu /~akim/sck/bud.htm   (4725 words)

  
 Was Korea founded in 2333 BC?   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
The date is computed based on the description of Dongguk Tonggam (Annals of the Eastern Kingdom) (1485): Dangun took over the throne in the 25th year of Emperor Yao's reign, the year of wuchen (the 5th year of the 60-year cycle Ganzhi).
It is to be noted that another history book Samguk Yusa (1284) points to the different date: the 50th year of Emperor Yao's reign, the year of gengyin (the 27th year of Ganzhi).
According to Samguk Yusa, Dangun's mother is not a woman from a bear-totem tribe but a bear transformed into a woman called Ungnyeo (bear woman), and Dangun, not his descendants, ruled Gojeoson for 1,500 years.
www.geocities.com /neue_strassenbahn/panmannyeon.html   (331 words)

  
 XII
The accuracy of much that is in the Samguk sagi, a history of the ancient three kingdoms up until the Silla unification, is a source of much historical debate.
However, it also must be said that much in the Samguk sagi, especially its later dates, has been corroborated in this century by the archaeological record, which continues to come to light.
Samguk sagi and the Unification Wars.” Ph.D. dissertation, University of California, Berkeley, 1969.
www2.hawaii.edu /~dkane/Sam.htm   (639 words)

  
 dangun
The oldest existing record of the foundation myth involving him appears in the Samguk Yusa, a 13th-century collection of legends and stories.
It is often said that Dangun ascended to the throne in 2333 BC, based on the description of the Dongguk Tonggam (1485), but the date differs among historical sources; nevertheless, all of them put it during Yao's reign (traditional dates: 2357 BC-2256 BC).
The Samguk Yusa say Dangun ascended to the throne in the 50th year of Yao's reign, while Sejong Sillok says the first year and Dongguk Tonggam says the 25th year.
www.fact-library.com /dangun.html   (919 words)

  
 Hwa Rang Do: Research
Note: In Samguk Sagi and Samguk Yusa the date of the second founding of Hwarang Do (from the first inception of Wonhwa to the institution of the Hwarang) is given as the 37th year of King Chinhung (A.D.576).
The compiler of Samguk Sagi adds to his account of this story a quotation from the foundation of Hwarang, including the quotation from Kim Tae-mun about generals and statesmen.
At the end of a chapter in the original Samguk Yusa there is a note where the compiler adds that the popular opinion that Ansang was a member of the band of the Hwarang Chunyóng-rang is unprovable.
www.hwarangdo.com /hwarang.htm   (12702 words)

  
 Samguk Yusa   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Samguk Yusa es una colección de leyendas, de folktales, y de cuentas históricas referente a los tres reinos de Corea (Goguryeo, Baekje y Silla), así como a otros períodos y estados antes, durante, y después del período de tres reinos.
Desemejante del Samguk efectivo-orientado Sagi, Ilyon se centró más en los varios folklores, leyendas, y biografías.
Samguk Yusa es colección de leyendas, de folktales, y de cuentas históricas referente a los tres reinos supuestos de Corea (Goguryeo, Baekje y Silla), así como una otro períodos y los estados antes, durante, y después del período de tres reinos.
www.yotor.net /wiki/es/sa/Samguk%20Yusa.htm   (631 words)

  
 Hwa Rang Do: Research, Part II
The first translation is from Samguk Sagi (compiled by a Confucian general) and the second is from Samguk Yusa (complied by a monk).
In the monograph on music in the Samguk Sagi there is a note that the followers of Wól-lang (Wóllang-do) was responsible for a composition.
The Samguk Sagi and the Koryó-sa were arranged by category rather than chronologically and thus both suffer from the consequent complexity.
www.hwarangdo.com /hwarang2.htm   (11440 words)

  
 Samguk Sagi   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Samguk Sagi (Chronicles de los tres reinos) es un archivo histórico de los tres reinos de Corea: Goguryeo, Baekje y Silla.
El Samguk Sagi fue escrito en chino clásico (según lo utilizado en escribir por los eruditos coreanos en ese entonces) y compilado por el historiador coreano Kim Busik (軾 del 富 del 金) en 1145.
Algunos historiadores modernos son críticos de los archivos ofrecidos en Samguk Sagi.
www.yotor.net /wiki/es/sa/Samguk%20Sagi.htm   (275 words)

  
 Tria Regna Coreae - Vicipaedia
Tria Regna Coreae (Coreane: 삼국 seu 三國, Samguk) fuerunt Cogurio, Paecce, et Silla.
Haec tria regna erant in peninsula Coreana et Manchuria inter saeculum 1 a.C.n.
Nomina Samguk Sagi et Samguk Yusa sunt, Samguk significans tria regna.
la.wikipedia.org /wiki/Tria_Regna_Coreae   (201 words)

  
 Korean Architecture: Seokguram (Sokkuram) grotto, Gyeongju   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Historical references to the Seokguram are nonexistent but for a single account recorded in the Samguk Yusa (Legends of the Three Kingdoms) written by the monk Iryon in the 14th century.
King Munmu was a sovereign of Silla who asked to be cremated in the sea so that his spirit could become a dragon to protect the kingdom from the east.
The mountain on which the Seokguram stands, Tohamsan, is listed in the Samguk Sagi as the easternmost of five mountains protecting Silla from foreign invasion.
www.orientalarchitecture.com /kyongju/SEOKGURAM.htm   (1148 words)

  
 History of Korean Martial Arts
In the Samguk Sagi ("History of the Three Kingdoms", written during the 12th century), there is merely fragmentary allusions to a "double-sword dance" in the nation of Karak (Karak, also known as Kaya, existed on the southern tip of the Korean Peninsula between approximately 42 BC to 562 AD).
In the Samguk Yusa ("Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms", written during the 13th Century), it is recorded that generals in the three kingdoms of Koguro, Paekchae, and Silla trained hard at martial arts and contested among themselves.
References can be found in the Samguk Sagi to "Chuk-guk" ("to kick a football"-an ancient game played with a ball of leather stuffed with hair), "Too-ho" ("the game of pitchpot"), "Soo-bak" ("striking with the hands"), "Chu-choon" ("a rope swinging activity"), "Chuk-ma" ("bamboo horse"), "Gum-moo" ("sword dance"), and so on.
www.completemartialarts.com /information/styles/korean/koreanhistory.htm   (3188 words)

  
 Hubaekje   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Most of our information about the kingdom comes from the accounts found in the Samguk Yusa and Samguk Sagi, which largely coincide.
When it began with his attack on Gwangju in 892, Gyeon Hwon's was only one among numerous rebellions which sprouted up against the weak Silla rulers in late 9th century.
Together with Wanggeon, the Samguk Yusa reports that he led an army of 100,000 against his former kingdom.
www.worldhistory.com /wiki/H/Hubaekje.htm   (778 words)

  
 Preserving the Lore of Korean Antiquity: Iryon's Privileging of Local Discourse in the Samguk yusa - Events - Institute ...
Iryon (1206-89), who took refuge in North Kyongsang Province after passing monastic examinations in the Koryo capital, composed the Samguk yusa to preserve anecdotes from antiquity for to demonstrate that the tales of Korea's founding ancestors were the equal of those of China.
A more fruitful way to conceptualize the differences between the Samguk sagi and Samguk yusa is to think of the former as representative of official or central discourse and the latter as promoting local discourse.
The great wealth and worth of the Samguk yusa comes from its inclusion of many types of local materials, anecdotes, traditional narratives, and native songs, as well as ancient myths and legends transformed by Buddhist conceptualizations of the universe.
ieas.berkeley.edu /events/2005.10.07.html   (314 words)

  
 Articles - Baekje   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
According to the Samguk Sagi, Baekje was founded in 18 BCE by King Onjo, who led a group of people from Buyeo in Manchuria to the Han River region of Korea.
Jumong escaped from Buyeo, where he was facing persecution, to the Jolbon area, where he married the daughter of a local leader and founded the kingdom of Goguryeo.
According to the Samguk Yusa, during the Sabi period, the chief minister (or jaesang, 재상) of Baekje was chosen by a unique system.
www.lastring.com /articles/Baekje   (2545 words)

  
 Samguk Yusa - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Samguk Yusa - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
This page was last modified 20:56, 27 May 2005.
The article about Samguk Yusa contains information related to Samguk Yusa and See also.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Samguk_Yusa   (293 words)

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