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Topic: Samnites


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In the News (Fri 24 May 19)

  
  Samnites - LoveToKnow 1911
SAMNITES, the name given by the Romans to the warlike tribes inhabiting the mountainous centre of the S. half of Italy.
The word Samnites was not the name, so far as we know, used by the Samnites themselves, which would seem rather to have been (the Oscan form of) the word which in Latin appears as Sabini (see below).
The Samnite towns in or near the upper valley of the Volturnus, namely, Telesia, Allifae, Aesernia, and the problematic Phistelia, learnt the art of striking coins from their neighbours in Campania, on the other side of the valley, Compulteria and Venafrum, in the 4th century B.C. (see Conway, op.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Samnites   (535 words)

  
 TREGLIA ON LINE - THE HISTORY - THE SAMNITES
Moreover, the cult of the Samnites was influenced by the Greeks.
The religion was important for the civilization of the Samnites as to be an element of unity.
In fact, all samnite toutos worshiped the same divinities and, in case of war, the soldiers took sacred oath that never was violated.
www.tregliaonline.it /origini_sanniti_en.htm   (925 words)

  
  Samnites - LoveToKnow 1911
SAMNITES, the name given by the Romans to the warlike tribes inhabiting the mountainous centre of the S. half of Italy.
The word Samnites was not the name, so far as we know, used by the Samnites themselves, which would seem rather to have been (the Oscan form of) the word which in Latin appears as Sabini (see below).
The Samnite towns in or near the upper valley of the Volturnus, namely, Telesia, Allifae, Aesernia, and the problematic Phistelia, learnt the art of striking coins from their neighbours in Campania, on the other side of the valley, Compulteria and Venafrum, in the 4th century B.C. (see Conway, op.
1911encyclopedia.org /Samnites   (535 words)

  
 SAMNITES - Online Information article about SAMNITES
The word Samnites was not the name, so far as we know, used by the Samnites themselves, which would seem rather to have been (the Oscan See also:
The ending of Samnites seems to be connected with the name by which they were known to the Greeks of the Campanian See also:
languages 2 For the difficult questions involved in the obscure and fragmentary accounts of the so-called First Samnite War, which ended in 341 B.C., the reader is referred to J.
encyclopedia.jrank.org /SAC_SAR/SAMNITES.html   (1035 words)

  
 Search Results for "Samnites"
The Samnites were Oscan-speaking and therefore should be included among the Sabelli.
He refused to be bribed by Samnite ambassadors, saying that it was more glorious to conquer owners...
Samnites and, as consul with Manlius Torquatus, commanded in the war with the Latins.
www.bartleby.com /cgi-bin/texis/webinator/65search?query=Samnites   (289 words)

  
 f. The Conquest of Italy. 2001. The Encyclopedia of World History
The THIRD SAMNITE WAR was the final effort by the Samnites—aided by the Etruscans, Umbrians, and Gauls—to halt Roman domination.
In 295 a large force of Samnites and Gauls was defeated at Sentinum, where a second Decius Mus was reputed to have secured a Roman victory by a devotio—that is, by seeking death in battle in exchange for divine assurance of Roman victory.
Samnite land was taken, and Latin colonies were established on it.
www.bartleby.com /67/227.html   (842 words)

  
 Warrior Challenge. Gladiators. Warrior Profile | PBS
Samnites, the heaviest armored gladiators, took their name, costume and weapons from the mighty warriors of Samnium, a region in southern Italy conquered by Rome in about 80 BC.
Samnites were usually paired with other heavy gladiators, such as Thracians or Murmillos.
A close kin to the Samnite was the Hoplomachus, a gladiator who so closely resembled the Samnites that the only known distinction today is the name - after the reign of Augustus, all gladiators were known as hoplomachi.
www.pbs.org /wnet/warriorchallenge/print/print_gladiators_profile.html   (765 words)

  
 15. The Samnite Wars Page 1
To overthrow the Samnites was the great object of Rome at this time, and for this purpose they offered their protection and alliance to all the cities that stood in dread of that people.
The Samnite wars may be considered as ending in 290, when the chief general of Samnium, Pontius Telesimus, was made prisoner and put to death at Rome.
The lands in the open country were quite subdued, but many Samnites still lived in the fastnesses of the Apennines in the south, which have ever since been the haunt of wild untamed men.
www.web-books.com /Classics/YoungFolks/Rome/YoungFolks_RomeC15P1.htm   (978 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Samnium (Oscan Safinim) was a region of the southern Apennines in Italy that was home to the Samnites, a group of Sabellic tribes that controlled the area from about 600 BCE to about 290 BCE.
For most of their history the Samnites were landlocked, but during a brief period they controlled parts of both coasts of the Italian peninsula.
Shortly thereafter the Samnite Wars broke out; they won an important battle against the Roman army in 321 BCE, and their empire reached its peak in 316 BCE after further gains from the Romans.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Samnites   (286 words)

  
 The History of Rome, Vol. II
The Samnites finding that instead of a peace which flattered their pride, the war was revived, and with the utmost inveteracy, not only felt, in their minds, a foreboding of all the consequences which ensued, but saw them, in a manner, before their eyes.
For such of the Samnites as dwelt on the mountains in separate villages, used to ravage the low lands, and the places on the coast; and being mountaineers, and savage themselves, despised the husbandmen who were of a gentler kind, and, as generally happens, resembled the district they inhabited.
The Samnite generals, on the contrary, considered that their battalions were becoming weakened daily by small losses, and the general vigour abated by prolonging the war.
www.bencourtney.com /ebooks/livy   (12086 words)

  
 History
The Samnites were people of the central southern Italy, a hardy race of shepherd and farmers with no marked differences in wealth and consequently without a distinct governing class.
The Samnites continued to fight in the Social War and the Civil against Sulla (138 - 78 BC), a Roman general, provincial governor and consul who was proclaimed dictator and was deposed three years later.
A Samnite named Pentri, because of his strength and courage as a gladiator and later because of his military contribution to the extension of the Roman Empire was made a citizen of Rome.
www.castropignano.com /history1eng.htm   (1020 words)

  
 Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, page 1123 (v. 2)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
In the ensuing night he broke through the Samnites who were encamped around him and joined the Roman consul, whom he forthwith persuaded to make an immediate attack upon the enemy.
While his colleague marched against the Samnites, Decius had the conduct of the war against the Etruscans, which he prosecuted with so much vigour that the Etruscans were contented to purchase a year's truce by paying and clothing the Roman army for that year.
The republic was menaced by a formidable coalition of Etruscans, Samnites, Umbrians, and Gauls; the aged Fabius was unanimously called to the consul­ship in order to meet the danger, but he would not accept the dignity without having his former col­league associated with him in the honour and the peril.
www.ancientlibrary.com /smith-bio/2231.html   (816 words)

  
 Mediterranean Total War- the SAMNITES (our 1st preview) - The Guild
The Samnites were composed of four tribes: the Pentri, the Caraceni, the Caudini and the Hirpini, and later the Frentani may have joined.
The most powerful group of the highlanders, the Samnite confederation, were in the middle of the fourth century, swarming down upon their civilized neighbours in Campania, as, farther east and south, Lucanians and Bruttians were agressing upon the Greek colonies in Magna Greacia.
The typical Samnite skirmishers carried javelins, a spear and the usual Samnite equipment, note that there is a swastika on their tunic and shield, we do not wish to offend anyone, but this was a respected sign for the ancients.
forums.totalwar.org /vb/showthread.php?t=63305   (1851 words)

  
 The Samnites
The five Samnitic tribes, with a collective population of around 600,000, would join forces in the case of war.
Among the many wars carried out by the Samnites, the ones against the Romans marked their disappearance and their end as a tribal entity.
A year later in Lucera, in 320 B.C., there was the 2nd Holy War in which the defeated Samnites, as a retaliatory act were forced by the Romans to undergo the same humiliation of passing under the giogo...The 3rd Holy War concluded in 292 B.C. and represented the definitive defeat of the Samnites.
www.morronedelsannio.com /eng_web/eng_sanniti.htm   (642 words)

  
 Capua - Samnite Wars   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Samnites were a tribal group of Italians living in the Apenine Mountains of Southern Italy.
The Romans were received rudely by the Samnites and in 343 Rome had declared war on Samnium.
Rome however continued dominating the war and in 304 BC the Samnites sued for peace, ending the Second Samnite War.
abacus.bates.edu /~jhoffste/samnite_wars.htm   (423 words)

  
 Rome, The Samnite Wars
Both the rugged terrain and the tough Samnite soldiers proved to be formidable challenges, which forced Rome to adopt military innovations that were later important for conquering the Mediterranean.
During these same years Rome organized a rudimentary navy, constructed its first military roads (construction of the Via Appia was begun in 312 BC and of the Via Valeria in 306), and increased the size of its annual military levy as seen from the increase of annually elected military tribunes from 6 to 16.
The Third Samnite War (298-290 BC) was the last desperate attempt of the Samnites to remain independent.
history-world.org /samnite_wars.htm   (950 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
To the north of Tarentum, the Samnites have grown in power and the fear of attacks from the tribe was what gave reason for the Tarentines to request aid from across the sea.
The Samnites took the initiative early in the year, throwing themselves back into the siege of Capua, losing 1,500 of their number but reducing the garrison to just a few hundred of men, who were barely holding out.
The Samnites managed to storm the city though almost half of their number were lost during the struggle and Egnatius himself lost his life.
grognard.com /reviews1/rrr.txt   (2900 words)

  
 The Caudine Forks
As a result of Samnite tactics and the carelessness of the Roman consuls, the Roman army found itself trapped between two mountain passes at a place known as the Caudine Forks.
The proposals that the Samnites put to the Roman ambassadors was according with the customs of warfare between cities.
The Romans would acknowledge their defeat, they would hand back those Samnite territories they had conquered an on which they had set up colonies, they would leave with the Samnites as hostages the officers of the army and 600 cavalry (equestrians), and then they would sign an alliance with the Samnites.
www.roman-empire.net /republic/rep-caudine.html   (337 words)

  
 Outlines of Roman History, Chapter 11
The cities in Campania revolted, the Samnites conquered Luceria in Apulia and Fregellae on the Liris, and gained an important victory in the south of Latium near Anxur.
This war is known as the third Samnite war, but it was in fact a war between Rome and the principal nations of Italy—the Samnites, the Umbrians, the Etruscans, and the Gauls.
The Samnites, on the contrary, were obliged to depend upon forces which were scattered from one end of the peninsula to the other.
www.forumromanum.org /history/morey11.html   (1599 words)

  
 Second Samnite War
The Samnites, of course, found this to be an unacceptable intrusion by Rome, but were too pre-occupied to respond immediately.
The Romans had claimed that the Samnites were encouraging the people of Neapolis to expand into the territories of Campania and necessitated the creation of colonies in disputed areas.
The Samnites were still a thorn in Rome's side, however, and conflict would be renewed within the decade.
www.unrv.com /empire/second-samnite-war.php   (1052 words)

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