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Topic: San Andreas Fault


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In the News (Sat 20 Apr 19)

  
  A Ton of Interest in Rocks From San Andreas Fault - washingtonpost.com
Scientists said yesterday that they have extracted a ton of rock from deep inside California's San Andreas fault, the first time anyone has collected samples from a geologically active fault zone where earthquakes are spawned.
The samples, which are part of the National Science Foundation-funded San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth project, were brought to the surface last month through boreholes.
The San Andreas fault, like most of the especially active ones, is the collision point of two massive and slowly moving tectonic plates -- one underlying the Pacific Ocean and the other bearing the North American continent.
www.washingtonpost.com /wp-dyn/content/article/2007/10/04/AR2007100402340.html   (639 words)

  
  Geological Overview of the San Gabriel Mountains   (Site not responding. Last check: )
To the west, the San Gabriel Mountains lie next to the Castaic Block, which shares a common basement adjacent to the range, and to the southwest, south of the San Gabriel fault, the geology is that of the Ventura Basin in the western Transverse Ranges.
The northeast flank of the structure, as seen in the Pelona Schist, is upended and truncated by the Punchbowl fault; the gently-dipping southwest flank is the northeasterly flank of a complementary synform, whose structure is obscured by the Mt. Waterman pluton.
The fault is responsible for approximately 44 km of right-lateral offset, and the strike-slip displacement is responsible for the folding and faulting of the Punchbowl Block (lying between the San Andreas and Punchbowl faults).
seis.natsci.csulb.edu /deptweb/SkinnyCalSites/TrnsverseRng/SanGabriels/SanGablOview2.html   (6924 words)

  
 The San Andreas Fault
The San Andreas is the "master" fault of an intricate fault network that cuts through rocks of the California coastal region.
The fault zone is marked by distinctive landforms that include long straight escarpments, narrow ridges, and small undrained ponds formed by the settling of small blocks within the zone.
During the 1906 earthquake in the San Francisco region, roads, fences, and rows of trees and bushes that crossed the fault were offset several yards, and the road across the head of Tomales Bay was offset almost 21 feet, the maximum offset recorded.
pubs.usgs.gov /gip/earthq3/safaultgip.html   (2265 words)

  
 San Andreas: San Andreas Fault
The San Andreas Fault is the sliding boundary between the Pacific Plate and the North American Plate.
One important subordinate fault is the Thomas Mountain fault that forms the southwest margin of Garner Valley.
Fault Slice Ridges are visible on the north side of the road between Bouquet Canyon Road and Johnson Pass Road.
www.lycos.com /info/san-andreas--san-andreas-fault.html   (493 words)

  
 ipedia.com: San Andreas Fault Article   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The San Andreas Fault is a right-lateral strike-slip fault that spans a length of roughly 800 miles (1287 kilometers) through California.
The San Andreas Fault marks a transform boundary between the Pacific Plate and the North American Plate.
The northern segment of the fault runs from Hollister, through the San Francisco Penninsula where it briefly goes offshore, then follows the coast of California fairly closely before it makes a sharp turn west and goes offshore near Eureka, California.
www.ipedia.com /san_andreas_fault.html   (599 words)

  
 San Andreas Fault
Lawson named the fault in 1895, when he noted that the fault features were typified by a straight valley on the San Francisco Peninsula that was occupied in part by San Andreas Lake (named by Father Francisco Palou, a Spanish missionary, on Saint Andrew’s Day, November 30, 1774).
San Andreas Lake today is occupied by one of two reservoirs that are major water storage units for the city of San Francisco.
Faulting and the consequent earthquakes arise from shifting in the planet’s structure.
www.desertusa.com /mag06/mar/san_andreas.html   (1896 words)

  
 The Influence of the Geometry of the San Andreas Fault System on Earthquakes in California
AB: The San Andreas Fault is believed to be the main surface trace of the plate boundary between the North American and the Pacific plates.
In the model, the San Andreas Fault is simulated with a weak zone that obeys the Coulomb Friction Law.
Along the bended San Andreas Fault in southern California, however, the relative plate motion causes significant off-main-trace stress buildup, consistent with the distribution of large historical earthquakes outside the San Andreas Fault.
www.agu.org /cgi-bin/SFgate/SFgate?language=English&verbose=0&listenv=table&application=fm04&convert=&converthl=&refinequery=&formintern=&formextern=&transquery=the%20influence%20of%20the%20geometry%20of%20the%20san%20andreas%20f.&_lines=&multiple=0&descriptor=%2fdata%2fepubs%2fwais%2findexes%2ffm04%2ffm04%7c1000%7c2753%7cThe%20Influence%20of%20the%20Geometry%20of%20the%20San%20Andreas%20Fault%20System%20on%20Earthquakes%20in%20California%7cHTML%7clocalhost:0%7c%2fdata%2fepubs%2fwais%2findexes%2ffm04%2ffm04%7c25000761%2025003514%20%2fdata2%2fepubs%2fwais%2fdata%2ffm04%2ffm04.txt   (307 words)

  
 :: SCRIPPS OCEANOGRAPHY NEWS : : New Scripps Study Reveals San Andreas Fault Set for the 'Big One' ::
He calculated the rate at which the fault is moving and estimated the "fault slip rate," the pace of the plate movement at the fault, at about an inch per year.
Fialko's analysis of the San Jacinto Fault, which winds through populated areas in San Bernardino, Riverside and Borrego Springs, found that it is moving at roughly twice the speed of previous estimates and thereby its propensity for earthquakes is greatly enhanced.
While the San Andreas is at risk for an earthquake of magnitude eight or higher, the San Jacinto Fault has an even greater risk for a slightly smaller earthquake of magnitude seven, which still falls into the category of a major earthquake.
scrippsnews.ucsd.edu /article_detail.cfm?article_num=736   (1389 words)

  
 Savage Earth: Restless Planet
The fault that let loose the 1994 Northridge earthquake was a dip-slip fault, at which a block of crust slid up the shallow ramp of another.
But when a fault is stuck, the rocks on either side of it store the building stresses until a critical limit is reached, and the rocks move suddenly along the fault, releasing the stresses like a spring uncoiling.
During the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, the west side of the San Andreas fault slid 21 feet northward.
www.pbs.org /wnet/savageearth/earthquakes   (1193 words)

  
 San Andreas Fault-Geol-101
The San Andreas Fault is on of the most active and interesting in the world.
The Fault is located in Western California and streches from the Gulf of California to the Pacific Ocean to Point Arena, which is just north of San Francisco.(Earth370) Brief History: The San Andreas Fault has been dated at 29 million years old.
Another disasterous event that resulted from the San Andreas Fault was the Los Angeles earthquake of 1994 in which 15 million dollars worth of damage was caused along with the lives of 51 people lost.
www.angelfire.com /al/davegeol   (223 words)

  
 Study details quake at San Andreas fault - Boston.com
A powerful earthquake on the southern San Andreas fault, which hasn't ruptured in over three centuries, is capable of producing prolonged periods of strong shaking in the greater Los Angeles region, a new study finds.
LOS ANGELES --A powerful earthquake on the southern San Andreas fault, which hasn't ruptured in over three centuries, is capable of producing prolonged periods of strong shaking in the greater Los Angeles region, a new study finds.
The southern San Andreas last snapped in 1690, unleashing a strong quake that caused relatively little damage because few people lived in the area.
www.boston.com /news/science/articles/2006/05/12/study_probes_quake_at_san_andreas_fault   (422 words)

  
 Buena Vista Museum Of Natural History - San Andreas Fault
The San Andreas Fault was named by geologist A.C. Lawson in 1895 for San Andreas Lake, a "sag pond," on the fault trace about 20 miles south of San Francisco.
San Andreas Lake is now occupied by one of two reservoirs that are major water storage areas for San Francisco.
The fault can be subdivided into many segments; the boundaries of these segments are defined by the rate of creep or offset due to earthquakes.
www.sharktoothhill.com /fault.html   (652 words)

  
 01.09.2004 - Quakes along central San Andreas Fault peak every three-years
The scientists found that the frequency of these repeating microquakes along the fault segment rises and falls over a three-year period, and that moderate to large earthquakes are six to seven times more likely to occur at the upswing of this cycle.
The San Andreas, which stretches from Los Angeles into the Pacific Ocean off the northern coast of California, broke along its northern half in 1906 to cause the great San Francisco earthquake and fire.
Fault pulsing where large earthquakes occur has been seen at two other places, in Japan and in the Pacific Northwest, but both of these sites are subduction zones where the earth's crust is diving beneath adjacent tectonic plates.
www.berkeley.edu /news/media/releases/2004/01/09_quakes.shtml   (1113 words)

  
 Quakes Along Central San Andreas Fault Peak Every Three-Years
The scientists found that the frequency of these repeating microquakes along the fault segment rises and falls over a three-year period, and that moderate to large earthquakes are six to seven times more likely to occur at the upswing of this cycle.
The San Andreas, which stretches from Los Angeles into the Pacific Ocean off the northern coast of California, broke along its northern half in 1906 to cause the great San Francisco earthquake and fire.
Fault pulsing where large earthquakes occur has been seen at two other places, in Japan and in the Pacific Northwest, but both of these sites are subduction zones where the earth's crust is diving beneath adjacent tectonic plates.
www.spacedaily.com /news/tectonics-04a.html   (1151 words)

  
 San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth
Schematic cross section of the San Andreas Fault Zone at Parkfield, showing the drill hole for the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) and the pilot hole drilled in 2002.
Drilling the hole for SAFOD starts west of the San Andreas Fault and then use advanced directional-drilling technology developed by the petroleum industry to angle the hole through the entire fault zone until relatively undisturbed rock is reached on the east side.
A 2.2-km-deep vertical pilot hole was drilled adjacent to the San Andreas Fault at Parkfield in the summer of 2002.
quake.wr.usgs.gov /research/parkfield/safod_pbo.html   (597 words)

  
 San Andreas Fault subject of three-day conference: 9/00
According to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the quake was produced by a new fault previously unknown to scientists that is probably an offshoot of the larger San Andreas system.
Beginning today, the San Andreas fault system will be the subject of a long-planned conference at Stanford and the USGS in Menlo Park.
The San Andreas fault system marks the boundary between the massive North American and Pacific plates, which continually grind together producing underground stresses that sometimes trigger earthquakes.
news-service.stanford.edu /news/2000/september6/sanandreas-96.html   (731 words)

  
 Phenomenon - San Andreas Fault
San Andreas Fault is a long fracture in the earth's crust marked by a zone of disrupted land in California.
The San Andreas Fault, unlike most faults that stay below the ocean, emerges from the Pacific Ocean and traverses hundreds of miles of land.
In 1857, a sudden movement along a segment of the San Andreas Fault in the Transverse Ranges caused a severe earthquake in southern California.
library.thinkquest.org /C005686/htmfiles/sanandreasfault.htm   (138 words)

  
 FOXNews.com - Study: San Andreas Fault Overdue for Quake
Experts have estimated that a quake on the southern San Andreas of magnitude-7.6 or greater could kill thousands of people in the densely populated greater Los Angeles area and cause tens of billions of dollars in damage.
It was the 800-mile San Andreas fault, which runs down California like a scar, that caused the 1906 San Francisco earthquake that led to about 3,000 deaths.
The fault's slip rate, or average annual movement, was measured to be about an inch a year _ similar to previous estimates.
www.foxnews.com /printer_friendly_wires/2006Jun21/0,4675,SanAndreasFault,00.html   (436 words)

  
 Tour of the San Andreas fault
The San Andreas Fault carries the majority of the motion between the Pacific and North American plates, but about 25% of that motion is accommodated by various other faults.
This scarp marks the fault, showing that there was vertical motion on the fault as well as the sideways slip, but a bigger marker is this line of palm trees.
This is because the fault tends to form a barrier to groundwater in the subsurface rocks, so that the water collects behind the underground dam until it seeps out at the surface as springs.
piru.alexandria.ucsb.edu /collections/atwater/saf/indexOLD3.htm   (1756 words)

  
 SAN ANDREAS FAULT ZONE
Here the San Andreas fault interacts with other faults (most notably the San Jacinto fault zone and the Pinto Mountain fault) and thereby becomes somewhat fractured, over the distance extending from just north of San Bernardino to just north of Indio, some 110 kilometers (70 miles).
Fault rupture mechanics are still not well understood, however, and the discontinuity could prove to have little effect on tempering a major earthquake on this southern stretch of the San Andreas fault zone.
Below is a clickable map of the San Gorgonio Pass area, similar to the other clickable maps within these pages; clicking on the surface trace of a fault will take you to a file detailing some of the features of that fault.
www.data.scec.org /fault_index/sanandre.html   (444 words)

  
 EarthScope: SAFOD Observatory
The Parkfield region is the most comprehensively instrumented section of a fault anywhere in the world, and has been the focus of intensive study for the past two decades.
This site is ~ 1.8 km SW of the San Andreas fault near Parkfield, CA, on a segment of the fault that moves through a combination of aseismic creep and repeating microearthquakes.
The Parkfield region is the most comprehensively instrumented section of a fault anywhere in the world, and has been the focus of intensive study for the past two decades as part of the Parkfield Earthquake Experiment.
www.earthscope.org /safod   (345 words)

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