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Topic: Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis


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 Sapir-Whorf hypothesis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Whorf's formulation of this "principle of linguistic relativity" is often stereotyped as a "prisonhouse" view of language in which one's thinking and behavior is completely and utterly shaped by one's language.
Whorf himself claimed that his work on the SWH was inspired by his insight that a Hopi speaker would find relativistic physics fundamentally easier to grasp than an SAE speaker would.
Whorf's close analysis of the differences between English and (in one famous instance) the Hopi language raised the bar for an analysis of the relationship between language, thought, and reality by relying on close analysis of grammatical structure, rather than a more impressionistic account of the differences between, say, vocabulary items in a language.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Sapir-Whorf_hypothesis   (2756 words)

  
 The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis
Supporters of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis must acknowledge that their study of language in the "real world" is not without doubt if their language influences how they categorize what they seem to experience.
Penn notes that the hypothesis is stated "more and less strongly in different places in Sapir's and Whorf's writings" (1972:13).
Alford, D. "Demise of the Whorf Hypothesis." http://www.sunflower.com/~dwatson/dma-dwh.htm.
www.angelfire.com /journal/worldtour99/sapirwhorf.html   (3081 words)

  
 What Whorf Really Said
Whorf saw his theory as more of an intrinsic part of reality from which hypotheses could be made, rather than a hypothesis itself.
Whorf answered the current debate on the Whorfian hypothesis almost 50 years ago in his book.
Contemporary accounts of the "Whorfian hypothesis" also neglect another important element that recurs in his papers, and that is his motivation for carving out such a principle.
www.nickyee.com /ponder/whorf.html   (4209 words)

  
 Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis
The Sapir-Whorf hypothesis is in effect two propositions, which in a very basic form could perhaps be summed up as firstly Linguistic Determinism (language determines thought), and secondly Linguistic relativity (difference in language equals difference in thought).
He eventually became a full time linguist and the application of his theories (which are generally understood to be the major part of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis) has become known as Whorfianism.
Brown (1958) and Lenneberg (1953) pointed out that Whorf never met an actual Indian, so his assessments of their character must be somewhat vague, and also that his translations of Hopi sentences were done to seem as different as possible, to emphasise the ‘different system of thinking’.
www.aber.ac.uk /media/Students/njp0001.html   (2526 words)

  
 Ontology and the Linguistic Relativity (Sapir-Whorf) Hypothesis
It is clear from this background that the "Sapir-Whorf" hypothesis in its classical form arose from deep historical roots but in a particular intellectual climate.
Whorf argued that each language refers to an infinite variety of experiences with a finite array of formal categories (both lexical and grammatical) by trouping experiences together as analogically `the same' for the purposes of speech.
His student Edward Sapir (1884-1939) accepted the main thrust of Boas' position but came to feel that the closely knit system of categories in a language could represent incommensurable analyses of experience with effects on speakers' conceptual view points and aesthetic interpretations.
www.formalontology.it /linguistic-relativity.htm   (3008 words)

  
 Current Research on the Whorf-Sapir Hypothesis
Nobody has gained significant ground in proving or refuting the hypothesis because the definitions of Sapir and Whorf are very vague and incomplete, leaving room for a significant amount of interpretation.
Most linguists who study the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis cite examples demonstrating why they either support the conclusions of Whorf and Sapir, reject them, or are unsure of exactly what the hypothesis is about.
Edward Sapir and his student Benjamin Whorf are credited with developing the most relevant explanation outlining the relationship between thought and language, the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis.
www.geocities.com /CollegePark/4110/whorf.html   (1838 words)

  
 Whorf Hypothesis
Whorf coined what was once called the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, which is more properly referred to as the Whorf hypothesis.
Although I personally find Whorf's hypothesis to be wanting in many areas, I believe that discussion about this topic is an important part of the globalization and cultural education in the world today.
Whorf fully believed in linguistic determinism; that what one thinks is fully determined by their language.
www.mnsu.edu /emuseum/cultural/language/whorf.html   (1330 words)

  
 Florian Haasper - The Sapir-Whorf hypothesis
The results of their work are often referred to as the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, although I prefer to call it the Whorfian hypothesis or more plainly the Linguistic Relativity hypothesis, because it was mainly Whorf who developed the central thoughts of that theory.
Instead of the deterministic form of the hypothesis, it is the more moderate Whorfianism that is accepted nowadays.
Whorf went even further when he wrote that We dissect nature along lines laid down by our native languages […and that] We cut nature up, organize it into concepts, and ascribe significances as we do, largely because we are parties to an agreement to organize it in this way….
www.haasper-online.de /SapirWhorf.htm   (2018 words)

  
 Scott Sommers' Taiwan Weblog : The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis
Scott Sommers' Taiwan Weblog : The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis
A while ago I read through a few posts on the sapir-whorf hypothesis over at language log.
I had never heard of the The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis before I saw this post, and everything I know about it comes from the brief reading that I have done since then.
scottsommers.blogs.com /taiwanweblog/2004/06/the_sapirwhorf_.html   (1561 words)

  
 Lojban and the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis
The 'version' of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis guiding Lojban development states that "the structures of language constrains the thought patterns of participants in the culture associated with that language." Lojban attempts to test this hypothesis by removing constraints in several areas of language use, while imposing other constraints not found in natural languages.
There are several interpretations of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis.
The Sapir-Whorf hypothesis has also permeated the study of literature.
www.alamut.com /subj/artiface/language/sapirWhorf.html   (812 words)

  
 The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis
This famous passage from the American linguist and anthropologist Edward Sapir (1884-1936)'s 'The Status Of Linguistics As A Science', written in 1929, demonstrates the dominating thought of what has come to be called by all sorts of names including the 'Sapir-Whorf hypothesis', the 'Whorfian hypothesis' and more plainly the 'Linguistic Relativity hypothesis'.
Wilhelm von Humboldt (1767-1835) was the first European to combine a knowledge of various languages with a philosophical background; he equated language and thought exactly in a hypothesis we now call the 'Weltanschauung' (world-view) hypothesis, in fact a version of the extreme form of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis.
This apparently made quite an impression on Whorf, who imagined that the scientists of the day and the Hopi must see the world very differently...although the philosopher Max Black considers that 'they may be expected to have pretty much the same concept of time that we have' in spite of this.
venus.va.com.au /suggestion/sapir.html   (1865 words)

  
 The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis Hoax on VMs List
I think Whorf's main contribution was to call attention for the pragmatic interplay of language and culture rather than by the verifiability of his hypothesis.
This suggests strongly that Whorf was wrong: people are quite capable of thinking against the grain of their language, and to do so they use metaphors, linguistic conventions, or in extreme cases steal the appropriate words from other languages.
Robert Firth says: This suggests strongly that Whorf was wrong: people are quite capable of thinking against the grain of their language, and to do so they use metaphors, linguistic conventions, or in extreme cases steal the appropriate words from other languages.
www.enformy.com /dma-ls12.htm   (1376 words)

  
 Sapir-Whorf hypothesis. The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.
A hypothesis holding that the structure of a language affects the perceptions of reality of its speakers and thus influences their thought patterns and worldviews.
www.bartleby.com /61/31/S0083150.html   (89 words)

  
 Sapir
This part of the hypothesis can be defined: “distinctions encoded in one language are unique to that language along,” and that “there is no limit to the structural diversity of languages” (The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis, p.1).
The second division of the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis is linguistic relativism.
Linguist Edward Sapir and his student Benjamin Lee Whorf are known for their part in the popularization of this very principle.
zimmer.csufresno.edu /~johnca/spch100/4-9-sapir.htm   (1479 words)

  
 Close Range: The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis
It is important to note that the version of the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis you propose here is much closer to the one actually proposed by Whorf than the kind of arguments Mark Abley seems to be making.
Put generally (and putting to one side further anti-realist considerations), the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis is the thesis that culture, via its influence on language, substantially affects our thoughts about the world.
The question is this: does Burge-style anti-individualism underwrite a principled philosophical defense of the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis?
rationalhunter.typepad.com /close_range/2004/05/antiindividuali.html   (2131 words)

  
 What is Universal about the Representation of Color Experience? Lambda the Ultimate
The Sapir-Whorf hypothesis states that there is a systematic relationship between the grammatical categories of the language a person speaks and how that person both understands the world and behaves in it.
Sapir: Language, An Introduction to the Study of Speech
Of course, we could always use some more linguistics discussions.
lambda-the-ultimate.org /node/view/417   (387 words)

  
 The Sapir-Whorf-Korzybski Hypothesis
The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis (the 'Korzybski' annexation came later) claims that the structure of a language defines the way a person behaves and thinks, must surely have it wrong according to many cognitive scientists, including Noam Chomsky, Steven Pinker, and others.
For those who criticize Sapir and Whorf, please realize that the article in question refers to the Sapir-Whorf-Korzybski hypothesis.
Although the basic hypothesis of linguistic determinism surely has flaws, one should not overly criticize the first people who began thinking about this interesting subject.
www.nobeliefs.com /Sapir-Whorf-Korzybski.htm   (906 words)

  
 What is the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis?
Experimental evidence from the domain of color perception is presented for a version of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis that is considerably weaker than the version usually proposed.
For further information concerning use of UC Berkeley documents for other than research or instructional purposes, contact the Computer Science Division at the University of California at Berkeley, tr-cs@cs.berkeley.edu.
Display an overview of the document in one of the following formats.
cs-tr.cs.berkeley.edu /TR/UCB:COGSCI-83-08   (160 words)

  
 SAPIR-WHORF HYPOTHESIS
Edward Sapir and Benjamin Whorf (1920s and 1930s)
What is the relationship between worldview /culture and the language you speak?
www.southwestern.edu /~meyerr/sapirwhorf.htm   (75 words)

  
 Programming Languages Glossary
Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis The Sapir-Whorf hypothesis can be broken down into two basic principles: linguistic determinism and linguistic relativity.
Strong determinism is the view that language actually determines thought; that language and thought are identical.
Weak determinism holds that thought is merely affected by or influenced by our language.
www.cs.oswego.edu /~odendahl/programming/glossary/S   (75 words)

  
 Sapir-Whorf and programming languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Sapir-Whorf hypothesis is sometimes applied in computer science to postulate that programmers skilled in a certain programming language may not have a (deep) understanding of some concepts of other languages.
Some programmers find the task of algorithm design largely the same, regardless of the programming language used - and, with the overwhelming dominance of imperative languages in commercial applications, the supposed diversity of programming languages is often a case of slightly different syntax for essentially the same set of programming language constructs.
Most programmers consider this to be beneficial, and the bewildering multitude of programming languages can be defended with the remark that a new programming language, while not extending the set of all possible algorithms, does extend the set of all algorithms we can efficiently think about.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Sapir-Whorf_and_programming_languages   (75 words)

  
 Sense of Wonder On the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis and its relation to programming languages
Thus, the main feature of imperative languages are variables —memory-, with assignment statements —pipe from/to memory- and the iterative form of repetition, with instructions stored in adjacent memory cells, discouraging the use of recursion for repetition.
verbalization of thought: programming languages are tools used to create programs, and as tools, their limitations bound the programmer expressability and creativity.
In the first case, language and thought are equaled, a variant that almost nobody advocates.
www.cerezo.name /archives/000005.html   (75 words)

  
 syllabus.html
This course assumes the weak Sapir-Whorf hypothesis in the context of programming languages, concluding that the languages or paradigms used influence the various approaches the programmer considers.
This course is designed to explore the interaction between programming languages and program design.
It aims to improve the students' abilities to think about programming by instilling an awareness of various programming styles and their effects.
www.cs.utexas.edu /users/danb/courses/fa05/sapir-whorf/syllabus.html   (75 words)

  
 iahessay
Linguistic determinations is also knows as the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis A good example of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis would be the example given by Whorf about Eskimos and their word for snow.
“The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis was named after Edward Sapir and Benjamin Whorf, two American linguistics.
Edward Sapir and his student Benjamin Whorf, theorized that language determines culture.
www.msu.edu /~joneslar/iahessay.htm   (1150 words)

  
 Mid Frame
This famous passage from the American linguist and anthropologist Edward Sapir's (1884-1936) "The Status Of Linguistics As A Science", written in 1929, demonstrates the dominating thought of what has been referred to as 'Sapir-Whorf hypothesis', the 'Whorfian hypothesis' and more plainly the 'Linguistic Relativity hypothesis'.
Ben Whorf had this to say about his hypothesis: "We cut nature up, organize it into concepts, and ascribe significances as we do, largely because we are parties to an agreement that holds throughout our speech community and is codified in the patterns of our language.
Edward Sapir and Benjamin Whorf have had a profound impact on different cultures and the world as a whole.
www.colostate.edu /Depts/Speech/rccs/theory90.htm   (622 words)

  
 Lojban and the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis
The 'version' of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis guiding Lojban development states that "the structures of language constrains the thought patterns of participants in the culture associated with that language." Lojban attempts to test this hypothesis by removing constraints in several areas of language use, while imposing other constraints not found in natural languages.
The Sapir-Whorf hypothesis has also permeated the study of literature.
There are several interpretations of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis.
www.alamut.com /subj/artiface/language/sapirWhorf.html   (812 words)

  
 Current Research on the Whorf-Sapir Hypothesis
Edward Sapir and his student Benjamin Whorf are credited with developing the most relevant explanation outlining the relationship between thought and language, the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis.
Nobody has gained significant ground in proving or refuting the hypothesis because the definitions of Sapir and Whorf are very vague and incomplete, leaving room for a significant amount of interpretation.
Terwilliger and his supporters simply feel that the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis cannot be critically applied because the definitions of Whorf and Sapir are very vague.
www.geocities.com /CollegePark/4110/whorf.html   (1838 words)

  
 Term Papers 2000, Term papers, Vol.67, Pg.7, 050802
This paper begins by explaining that the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis is one of the most interesting and influential theories in the field of linguistics and anthropology.
A discussion of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, an influential theory of anthropolgy and linguistics.
"The Sapir-Whorf hypothesis "postulated that language not only provided a means of communication but also shaped peoples' perceptions of the world" (McGee and Warms 2000: 370).
www.termpapers2000.com /lib/essay/67_7.html   (1838 words)

  
 Benjamin Lee Whorf Linguistic Relativity Theory in Anthropology Questia.com Online Library
He collaborated with Edward Sapir at Yale Univ. in anthropological linguistics, and helped to develop the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis.
Language, Culture, and Society: An Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology ("The Whorf Hypothesis of Linguistic Relativity and Linguistic Determinism" begins on p.
Benjamin Lee Whorf, a student of Sapir's who had...with dual and triadic forms.
www.questia.com /library/communication/benjamin-lee-whorf.jsp   (598 words)

  
 Language and Thought
  This hypothesis was rooted in Sapir’s study of Native American Languages, which later drew the particular attention of Sapir’s student Benjamin Lee Whorf.
This statement and similar ones by Whorf, attempting to illustrate that language is the medium by which one views the world, culture, reality and thought have aroused an intense desire in not only scholars but also for non-scholars to validate of disprove this hypothesis.
  Whorf sites several examples form the Native American language, Hopi, to support his hypothesis that thought is strongly based on language.
www.ttt.org /linglinks/StacyPhipps.htm   (2076 words)

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