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Topic: Sardis


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In the News (Sun 23 Jun 19)

  
  Sardis (BiblePlaces.com)
Known biblically as the home of the church that received the fifth of letters to the seven churches in Revelation, Sardis was the capital of the Lydian empire and one of the greatest cities of the ancient world.
Artemis was the main goddess of the city and the temple dedicated to her in Sardis was one of the seven largest Greek temples (more than double the size of the Parthenon).
Sardis (Republic of Turkey, Ministry of Culture) A brief encyclopedia-type article which discusses the history of the region.
www.bibleplaces.com /sardis.htm   (678 words)

  
  Sardis - All About Turkey
Sardis lies in the territory of ancient Lydia, at the foot of the Tumulus Mountains and overlooking the Hermus River plain, where evidence has been found of human activity as early as the Paleolithic period (ca.
Recent excavations have focused on the Archaic era, particularly the 7th and 6th centuries B.C., when Sardis was the capital of the Lydian empire and at the height of its power, and on the Late Roman era, when the city was still flourishing.
By the early 7th century B.C., Sardis was the capital of a growing empire, with a distinct archaeological record.
www.allaboutturkey.com /sardis.htm   (433 words)

  
  Sardis
Sardis is essential to attention and short-term memory.
As I explain below, the church of Sardis is also described in the book of Zechariah as the golden lampstand with the seven lamps, the two olive branches and the two golden pipes (Zech 4:2).
Notice the reference to 'his name.' This is another clue that tells me that output signals from Sardis eventually make their way to Pergamum where they are given a new name and used for motor output.
www.rebelscience.org /Seven/sardis.html   (2441 words)

  
  Sardis - LoveToKnow 1911   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The earliest reference to Sardis is in the Persae of Aeschylus (472 B.C.); in the Iliad the name Hyde seems to be given to the city of the Maeonian (i.e.
Its importance was due, first to its military strength, secondly to its situation on an important highway leading from the interior to the Aegean coast, and thirdly to its commanding the wide and fertile plain of the Hermus.
from Sardis, a little south of the sacred Gygaean Lake, Coloe; here the Maeonian chiefs, sons, according to Homer, of the lake, were brought to sleep beside their mother.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Sardis   (642 words)

  
 Bible Study - Sardis
Sardis (also spelled Sardes), was an ancient city of Asia Minor (today Turkey), in the 7th century B.C. the capital city of the Kingdom of Lydia.
Sardis was known for its crafts and artistry, and as the first city where silver and gold coins were minted.
Sardis was located in the Hermus Valley, near the major road system that linked it with Ephesus, Smyrna, Pergamum, Thyatira, Philadelphia, Laodicea - where The Seven Churches of Revelation were located.
www.keyway.ca /htm2000/20000323.htm   (355 words)

  
 Rendeciler orman ürünleri ltd- keresteci-
Sardis lies in the territory of ancient Lydia, at the foot of the Tumulus Mountains and overlooking the Hermus River plain, where evidence has been found of human activity as early as the Paleolithic period (ca.
Recent excavations have focused on the Archaic era, particularly the 7th and 6th centuries B.C., when Sardis was the capital of the Lydian empire and at the height of its power, and on the Late Roman era, when the city was still flourishing.
By the early 7th century B.C., Sardis was the capital of a growing empire, with a distinct archaeological record.
elba.globat.com /~rendeciler.com/turkey/sardis.htm   (394 words)

  
 The Ancient Synagogue of Sardis
Sardis was reconstructed after the catastrophic earthquake of 17 CE and enjoyed a long period of prosperity under the Roman rule and then within the Byzantine Empire, until it was finally destroyed by the Mongols in 1402.
The beginnings of the Jewish settlement in Sardis are believed to belong to the 3rd century BCE, when Jews from Babylonia and other countries were encouraged to settle in the city by the Seleucid King Antiochus III (223-187 BCE).
The Jews of Sardis are mentioned by Josephus Flavius in the 1st century CE, who refers to a decree of the Roman proquestor Lucius Antonius from the previous century (50-49 BCE): "Lucius Antonius, the son of Marcus, vice-quaestor, and vice-praetor, to the magistrates, senate, and people of the Sardians, sends greetings.
www.bh.org.il /communities/Synagogue/Sardis.asp   (1556 words)

  
 Sardis   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Sardis was one of the legendary cities of Asia Minor in what is today Turkey.
In the seventh century B.C., Sardis was the capital of the kingdom of Lydia.
The Persians captured Sardis in the sixth century and made it the administrative center for the western part of their empire.
www.luthersem.edu /ckoester/Revelation/Sardis/Main.htm   (95 words)

  
 Sardis - Biblical places
Sardis was a town in the west of Asia Minor (Turkey), 50 miles east of Smyrna, and 30 miles southeast of Thyatira.
The letter to the church of Sardis was the 5th written to the 7 churches in Revelation, chapters 2 and 3.
It proclaimed that the church of Sardis was dead, and told the Christians there to be watchful and to strengthen what remained of their community.
www.aboutbibleprophecy.com /s29.htm   (162 words)

  
 Sardis Summary
Sardis, once the terminus of the Persian royal road from Susa (in modern Iran), was an ancient city in today's Turkey, famed as the capital of the kingdom of Lydia.
From 133 BCE Sardis fell under Roman rule; trade prospered; the population grew to 100,000, with a high Jewish and Christian element guaranteed by Imperial decree; and the city became the seat of one of the seven churches of Asia Minor, persisting in importance during the Byzantine era.
The city was captured by the Cimmerians in the 7th century, by the Persians and by the Athenians in the 6th, and by Antiochus III the Great at the end of the 3rd century.
www.bookrags.com /Sardis   (1283 words)

  
 Archaeological Exploration of Sardis
The City of Sardis: Approaches in Graphic Recording by Crawford H. Greenewalt, Jr., Nicholas D. Cahill, Philip T. Stinson, and Fikret K. Yegül.
Sardis lies in the territory of ancient Lydia, at the foot of the Tmolus Mountains and overlooking the Hermus River plain, where evidence has been found of human activity as early as the Palaeolithic period (ca.
Recent excavations have focused on the Archaic era, particularly the 7th and 6th centuries B.C., when Sardis was the capital of the Lydian empire and at the height of its power, and on the Late Roman era, when the city was still flourishing.
www.artmuseums.harvard.edu /sardis/sardis.html   (336 words)

  
 Sardis
Sardis was the capital of the ancient kingdom of Lydia which began in the 13th century BC.
It was in Sardis that the first coins minted under Croesus were said to have been struck but NIDBA notes that the gold derived from the Pactolus river and the other metallurgy that was carried on in the region was the foundation of the wealth of king Croesus from which the coins would have come.
Sardis was a city that had fallen twice through its complacency and self-sufficiency, thinking that their safety was guaranteed because of their natural defences.
www.arlev.clara.net /sardis.htm   (6974 words)

  
 Sardis in Mythology   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Croesus looked at the city of Sardis, which was being looted, and begged permission to speak his thoughts of the sight.
During the Ottoman period, the city of Sardis fell into misuse, but the name survived and was given to a village nearby.
Sardis, which covers a large area, with the acropolis, gymnasium and houses has besides the Artemis temple, the synagogue, which was restored in a recent period.
www.istanbulportal.com /Anatolia/Sardis.aspx   (1662 words)

  
 Jewish Sardis, Turkey
The ruins of Sardis lie less 90 km (56 miles) east of Izmir, a ride of 75 minutes along the main highway eastward to Salihli and Ankara, through rich fields of sultanas (grapes), figs and tobacco.
Though Sardis plays no role in the history of Jewish immigrants who came to the Ottoman Empire from Spain and Portugal, it is of interest because of its extremely large and rich Roman synagogue.
In ancient Sardis, Jews held seats on the city council and important offices in the Roman civil administration.
www.turkeytravelplanner.com /special/jewish/JewishSardis.html   (404 words)

  
 Sardis | Thematic Essay | Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art   (Site not responding. Last check: )
in the mid-sixth century B.C. Sardis lies at the foothills of Mount Tmolus in the valley of the Hermus River, a natural corridor that connects the Aegean and Anatolia.
Systematic exploitation of the region's rich mineral resources made Sardis a leading producer of gold in the eastern Mediterranean from the mid-seventh to mid-sixth century B.C., briefly lifting the kingdom to the world stage of economic and social history.
One of the most important sculptural pieces from Sardis is a stone shrine to Cybele that depicts the mother goddess standing in an Ionic temple.
www.metmuseum.org /toah/hd/srds/hd_srds.htm   (759 words)

  
 Sardis Roads Communities
Located along Sardis Road and Sardis Road North, this is a well-established community with character, solidly built homes, diversity in population, a strong and diversified business climate, and it has survived the test of time without being dated.
Sardis Roads also has some of the best values in real estate to be found in the city though values are growing quickly.
Besides many useful city and county parks, Sardis Roads is blessed with large and small churches, the nation's largest single private youth sports league, and lots of family fun things to do.
www.sardisroads.com /communities.html   (256 words)

  
 Sardis
Sardis' growth to importance, wealth and importance was its rich deposits of gold, but it also benefited from having an excellent connection between the Anatolian highlands and the Aegean Sea.
The wealth of gold near Sardis was explained through a myth: The legendary king Midas was rewarded by the god Dionysus so that all he touched was turned to gold.
Being the capital and judicial administrative centre of the Lydian province, Sardis sees a new period of growth and prosperity.
i-cias.com /e.o/sardis.htm   (357 words)

  
 Sardis
Sardis, terraces of the 6th century BC on the summit of the Acropolis.
Sardis, terraces of the 7th and 6th centuries BC on lower north slopes of the Acropolis.
One of the most exciting discoveries during recent excavations at Sardis was the exposure in 1988 of the skeleton of a young man, which lay among the debris of the fortification wall of the lower city, destroyed by the Persians in 547/6 BC.
www.about-turkey.com /karun/sardis.htm   (944 words)

  
 Cnapter 03 Sardis Revelation Study Guide
Sardis was a prominent city and obtained its wealth from textile manufacturing, jewelry trade, and the dye industry.
Sardis was in an ideal location in the plain of the River Hermus Valley.
Sardis became the capital of the kingdom of Lydia.
momentin.com /revstudy/chap03sardis.html   (13620 words)

  
 Sardis Bridge Officially Opens
Sen. Zeb Little, who served as master of ceremonies at the official ribbon cutting ceremony, told the assembled crowd of local officials and citizens of the Sardis community that the state of Sardis Bridge and several other local bridges was first made known to him shortly before he took office in 1998.
The newly completed Sardis Bridge cost approximately $3 million, 20 percent of which was provided in matching funds from the Cullman County Commission.
Widner also noted that the historical society has been involved in the process and that the old Sardis bridge, constructed in 1909 on 278 Highway near St. Bernard and moved to Sardis in the 1930s, will be preserved for posterity.
www.co.cullman.al.us /Press/sardis_bridge_officially_opens.htm   (1015 words)

  
 Sardis
Sardis was the city of residence of Croesus, the Lydian king of the VIth century B. (he reigned from 561 to his death in 546), whose story is told by Herodotus in the first book of his Histories (Histories, I, 6-94).
Lydia at the time was a very rich country, owing in particular to the gold of the Tmolus mountains that was carried down under the form of gold dust by the Pactolus river flowing through Sardis (Histories, I, 93 and Histories, V, 101).
Based on Herodotus' account, Sardis is linked in more than one way to the later history of Athens and Greece.
plato-dialogues.org /tools/loc/sardis.htm   (542 words)

  
 Sardis, Tennessee (TN) Detailed Profile - relocation, real estate, travel, jobs, hospitals, schools, crime, news, sex ...
Back to Sardis, TN housing info, Henderson County, Tennessee, TN smaller cities, TN small cities, All Cities.
According to our research there were 4 registered sex offenders living in Sardis, Tennessee in early 2007.
The ratio of number of residents in Sardis to the number of sex offenders is 113 to 1.
www.city-data.com /city/Sardis-Tennessee.html   (1146 words)

  
 About Sardis   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Sardis Elementary School is one of 20 schools serving students in kindergarten through fifth grade in the Hall County School System.
The purpose of Sardis Elementary is to provide quality education to students so they may reach their maximum potential.
The mission of Sardis Elementary School is to provide an innovative and nurturing environment that challenges students.
www.hallco.org /sardises/AboutSardis.html   (838 words)

  
 Aspects of Empire in Achaemenid Sardis - Cambridge University Press   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Populated by peoples of different backgrounds, languages and cultures, the empire's challenge was to construct a system that would provide for the needs of all groups.
Focusing on Sardis (a regional capital in western Anatolia), the book documents how the administration successfully annexed the region and its populace into the Persian Empire.
The urban structure of Achaemenid Sardis: sculpture and society; 5.
www.cambridge.org /us/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=052181071X   (185 words)

  
 Sardis, Turkey
The site of the ancient Lydian capital Sardis, once celebrated for its proverbial wealth and for its Sanctuary of Artemis, lies some 100km/60mi east of Izmir near the little village of Sartmustafa on the edge of the Gediz (Hermos) valley, a tributary of the Sart Çayi (ancient Paktolos).
The development of Sardis (Sardeis) was closely dependent on the emergence and growth of the Lydian Empire.
In 546 B.C. Sardis was conquered by the Persians under Cyrus and until 499 B.C. was the seat of a Persian satrap.
www.planetware.com /turkey/sardis-tr-mn-sr.htm   (359 words)

  
 Sardis - Pastor Peter's Bible Insights   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Sardis intersects the Old Testament was in connection with Cyrus
Sardis was the seat of a Persian satrap
was Sardis, where Xerxes received enormous wealth to support his war effort.
hometown.aol.com /peterwebit/TurkSardis.html   (636 words)

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